I am afraid to take the nerve test.

Posted by rp48819 @rp48819, Thu, Jul 30 6:53pm

Have had diabetes for over 20 years. Taking Metformin.
Have recently been experiencing burning pain in both feet. Mostly toes.
It is not a constant pain. Maybe once every few hours there will be a sharp burning shooting pain.

My Primary Doctor referred me to Neurologist for "peripheral neuropathy" who prescribed Gabapentin. 100mg capsules. 2 capsules morning and evening.
Been taking it for a week and pain seems to have come down.

Neurologist wants me to take a nerve test. Something to do with sticking a dry needle injection into leg (thigh I think) and applying electric shock. Also another test for hands.

I am not able to tolerate pain well and too afraid and anxious to take the test.

As long as the Gabapentin continues to work I may hold off on the test…

Hello @rp48819, Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. It's understandable to be apprehensive about a nerve conduction test. I've had several of them and didn't think they were painful but I think it can be subjective on my part. I've been fortunate each time to have a person administering the test that calmed me down and talked to me about what I would feel and when it would happen during the testing. There is another discussion that has a video that discusses the test and you might find it helpful to read and post any questions you might have.

Nerve conduction test: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/nerve-conduction-test/

Has your neurologist or primary care doctor discussed the possibility of your neuropathy being related to your diabetes?

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Hi there, @rp48819, Greetings from another of your Neuropathy mentors. We are not ganging up on you….just reaching out to let you know that we care because we have been there. Like John, I have had quite a few nerve conduction tests. The older I get the less they bother me. I am always more afraid that the actual test will be worse and it isn't. If you get to the punch test for small fiber neuropathy….it is over in seconds and really doesn't hurt at all. I have found that the technicians will help you with a calming agent if requested.

I had a new life partner who went with me to the last test. Do you think I was going to let him know I was nervous? No way. I could see that he was more disturbed than I was. So off went the tests to be analyzed and the neurologist let me know that I really didn't have enough nerves in the skin punch….also known as small fiber neuropathy. The knowledge gave him the direction to go and based upon the numbers, the medications that would be most helpful.

Now imagine if those tests were not done. How in the world would we be able to help you or ourselves? All of us at Connect are pretty savvy and we still do all of the required tests. The results help all of us to support each other. No one wants you to have discomfort. We do you want you to be healthy.

May you be free, safe, and protected.
Chris

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@johnbishop

Hello @rp48819, Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. It's understandable to be apprehensive about a nerve conduction test. I've had several of them and didn't think they were painful but I think it can be subjective on my part. I've been fortunate each time to have a person administering the test that calmed me down and talked to me about what I would feel and when it would happen during the testing. There is another discussion that has a video that discusses the test and you might find it helpful to read and post any questions you might have.

Nerve conduction test: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/nerve-conduction-test/

Has your neurologist or primary care doctor discussed the possibility of your neuropathy being related to your diabetes?

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"Has your neurologist or primary care doctor discussed the possibility of your neuropathy being related to your diabetes?"

My Primary Doctor's office have been treating me for type 2 Diabetes for many years with medications.

I had heard that most diabetics eventually experience peripheral neuropathy, so I assumed the nerve pain in both feet/toes is related to diabetes.

Neither the Primary nor Neurologist directly told me it was Diabetic Neuropathy… I am thinking it almost certainly is Diabetic Neuropathy since I have been diabetic for over 20 years. Diabetes after some time causes damage to the nerves in 60% of diabetics.

What else could it be?

Watched the nerve conduction test video. It looks like one of the purpose of that test is to exclude other nerve disorders?

REPLY
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