How do you identify trustworthy health information?

Posted by John, Volunteer Mentor @johnbishop, Thu, Jun 25 9:08am

Do you ever see something on TV or on the Internet and think, maybe this is what I need to help me? It can be really difficult to identify trustworthy health claims made by advertisers. I subscribe to a few health newsletters from Mayo Clinic and McMaster University and this morning I saw this article that had some great tips on how to identify trustworthy health information.

Don't believe the hype: 6 tips to identify trustworthy health information: https://www.mcmasteroptimalaging.org/blog/detail/blog/2017/05/02/dont-believe-the-hype-6-tips-to-identify-trustworthy-health-information

Here's some of the criteria I use when searching for trusted health information:
– Is it from a credible, reliable evidence-based source? Who wrote it?
– Is it recent and/or regularly reviewed and updated?
– What is the advertising policy or financial support for the website? Are they just after my money?

What criteria do you use to identify trustworthy health information?

This is very helpful information @johnbishop !
But now I can’t follow the link—says there’s an error somewhere 😥

REPLY
@becsbuddy

This is very helpful information @johnbishop !
But now I can’t follow the link—says there’s an error somewhere 😥

Jump to this post

Try it now Becky @becsbuddy — Not sure what happened but it had some HTML coding tags in the discussion after I saved it which messed up the formatting.

REPLY
@johnbishop

Try it now Becky @becsbuddy — Not sure what happened but it had some HTML coding tags in the discussion after I saved it which messed up the formatting.

Jump to this post

@johnbishop Thank you! Found it this time

REPLY

@johnbishop I follow some sites specific to my personal medical issues. Mayo Clinic and the wealth of information available is my top choice. Also following Multiple Myeloma and kidney sites. It's way too easy for charlatans to pop up on the internet these days!
Ginger

REPLY

I have to say that when in doubt – the Mayo Clinic. It's a source that not only can be relied on 100%, it also works on physicians. For example, myofascial problems, diagnosed by an excellent physiotherapist did not convince my otherwise reliable family doctor (I'm in Israel) but when I presented him with a printout from Mayo Clinic he admitted "there could be something in it". Wish you had a local branch 🙂

REPLY
@moragsmum

I have to say that when in doubt – the Mayo Clinic. It's a source that not only can be relied on 100%, it also works on physicians. For example, myofascial problems, diagnosed by an excellent physiotherapist did not convince my otherwise reliable family doctor (I'm in Israel) but when I presented him with a printout from Mayo Clinic he admitted "there could be something in it". Wish you had a local branch 🙂

Jump to this post

Hi @moragsmum — I'm fortunate to live close to the Rochester Mayo Clinic Campus and my primary care is a local Mayo Family Care Clinic. Have you seen this information? The first is from 2016 and the second 2019.

New Mayo Clinic Israeli Startups Initiative to Accelerate Innovation:
https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/new-mayo-clinic-israeli-startups-initiative-to-accelerate-innovation/

Israel Innovation Authority, Mayo Clinic set up joint healthcare program:
https://www.timesofisrael.com/israel-innovation-authority-mayo-clinic-set-up-joint-healthcare-program/

REPLY

Great question, @johnbishop. When I first was diagnosed with cancer we had no idea what else to do but take our physician's advice. Even now, 23 years later that is what most of us do and it's often to a partner or someone in their group. With the internet, you can now look up conversations about any doctor, hospital, or clinic- word of mouth via the internet. Google your illness and to sites that are specific to your illness. Ask your "connections" if you have any. In New England, we have a top teaching hospital and world-renowned, MGH. That's where my original surgeon went after leaving my home state. I had a family connection to the President of our local hospital and called him at home asking for information about my surgeon prior to my first surgery. He then called the Dean of Harvard and was told that my surgeon was one of his brightest students and a great surgeon. And I can attest to this.

REPLY

I follow Mayo Clinic and Cleveland Clinic

REPLY

I rely on Dr Neal Barnard (Physicians' Committee for Responsible Medicine) and Dr Michael Greger (Nutritionfacts.org). If I read something about a new superfood or wonder drug, I ignore it unless Dr Greger has researched it and recommends it. Also, I follow the way of eating recommended by them and also Dr John McDougall and a number of other people. Whole food, plant based with no added oils. At 71, I have no health issues, aside from a very small amount of occasional stiffness. I do follow the McMaster University optimal aging portal mentioned above but really just for curiosity.

REPLY

@johnbishop
Hi,
That’s a great link and I have pretty much always gone by the 6 tips that were mentioned. I am very skeptical of a lot of what I read on the web but don’t rely on any particular source. Unfortunately most people don’t do the research even when there is conflicting information on the same web page. People read what they want to believe. This is probably why Doctors get annoyed when their patients come to them with web knowledge. But I will read up on a diagnosis also so I can ask somewhat intelligent questions.

FL Mary

REPLY
Please login or register to post a reply.