High frequency hearing test: What hearing aids are best?

Posted by gulzar @gulzar, Mar 3, 2019

Please see the attached hearing test, I would like to know what type hearing aids will helps me to hear better for my high frequency hearing loss.

I asked at Costco in California he said he will gives me 30 minutes to walk around to try it inside the Costco. Anyway I don't believe any hearing aids will help for severe high frequency loss like mine.

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@golden418

Does anyone have any literature or other source of information that a spouse can read concerning hearing loss of the other spouse with tips for them to cope with it? My wife just does not understand my hearing loss (deaf in right ear / moderate to sever in the left) – I think she just does not understand what it is as she has perfect hearing.

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@golden418 I think often it's not that spouses don't understand, they just cannot adjust to having to speak a bit louder and more clearly. I sometimes say to my husband, when he speaks in a voice that I cannot hear, "oh, I have a hearing problem, could you please speak a little louder?" Of course, he already knew that so it is a bit sarcastic, but it reminds him. Of my family members, my son is the best at trying to accommodate my problem.

@gulzar My loss is also high-frequency. My Oticons definitely do help. They are not perfect, but then if you have a severe loss, no hearing aid is perfect.
JK

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@golden418

Does anyone have any literature or other source of information that a spouse can read concerning hearing loss of the other spouse with tips for them to cope with it? My wife just does not understand my hearing loss (deaf in right ear / moderate to sever in the left) – I think she just does not understand what it is as she has perfect hearing.

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My husband has hearing loss, and he wears hearing aids. He has worn them for 8 years. He still has to remind me when he cannot hear me. I can always tell when he needs to get them adjusted because he turns up the TV and stereo to a level that is uncomfortable to me.

I 'know' that he cannot hear me if I am behind him, or if there is background noise, but I forget, and he has to keep reminding me. It is a team effort of patience and learning to adjust and accept the hearing loss.
The thing that annoys me is when he responds to something that I said with a 'yes' or 'okay', only to find out later that he had no idea of what I had said. I used to accuse him of not listening – until he was diagnosed with the hearing loss. When he purchased the hearing aids, it was the cost that really grabbed our attention. No more denial!

@golden418, it is possible that your wife does not understand what it is like to have a hearing loss. My husband has explained that he doesn't hear when..; or it sounds like…; or I can't understand … I am still learning that it has to be an ongoing adjustment for both of us. The other thing is that when hearing loss comes on gradually, it can be harder for family and friends to ignore.

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@rosemarya

My husband has hearing loss, and he wears hearing aids. He has worn them for 8 years. He still has to remind me when he cannot hear me. I can always tell when he needs to get them adjusted because he turns up the TV and stereo to a level that is uncomfortable to me.

I 'know' that he cannot hear me if I am behind him, or if there is background noise, but I forget, and he has to keep reminding me. It is a team effort of patience and learning to adjust and accept the hearing loss.
The thing that annoys me is when he responds to something that I said with a 'yes' or 'okay', only to find out later that he had no idea of what I had said. I used to accuse him of not listening – until he was diagnosed with the hearing loss. When he purchased the hearing aids, it was the cost that really grabbed our attention. No more denial!

@golden418, it is possible that your wife does not understand what it is like to have a hearing loss. My husband has explained that he doesn't hear when..; or it sounds like…; or I can't understand … I am still learning that it has to be an ongoing adjustment for both of us. The other thing is that when hearing loss comes on gradually, it can be harder for family and friends to ignore.

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I bought the "connect clip" which is an accessory for my Oticon Opn hearing aids. It's a little microphone that the speaker wears and their voice goes right into my hearing aids. We haven't used it around the house, he is not big on having to wear it, but I think I will try to get him to, it would help a lot I think.

@rosemarya I suspect that other brands of hearing aids have similar accessories, maybe one could help your communication with your husband.
JK

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@golden418

Does anyone have any literature or other source of information that a spouse can read concerning hearing loss of the other spouse with tips for them to cope with it? My wife just does not understand my hearing loss (deaf in right ear / moderate to sever in the left) – I think she just does not understand what it is as she has perfect hearing.

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@golden418 I belong to the Hearing Loss Association of America, and if you would go to their website, hearing loss.org, you will find many resources for your spouse to read.

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@judymartin

@golden418 I belong to the Hearing Loss Association of America, and if you would go to their website, hearing loss.org, you will find many resources for your spouse to read.

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I just started a discussion called "Tips for Speaking with Someone with Hearing Loss," in which I put the text of a couple of very helpful Web pages, from the University of California Med School, and from Beltone. Please take a look — the advice there is great (and I added a few tips of my own).

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@golden418

Does anyone have any literature or other source of information that a spouse can read concerning hearing loss of the other spouse with tips for them to cope with it? My wife just does not understand my hearing loss (deaf in right ear / moderate to sever in the left) – I think she just does not understand what it is as she has perfect hearing.

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I believe you can find some literature on this topic of the hearing spouse on the HLAA website (hearinglossa.org). You also could see if there is a thread started yet on this Mayo Clinic forum home page.

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@editored

I just started a discussion called "Tips for Speaking with Someone with Hearing Loss," in which I put the text of a couple of very helpful Web pages, from the University of California Med School, and from Beltone. Please take a look — the advice there is great (and I added a few tips of my own).

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Here is a link to the discussion that @editored started:
– Tips for Speaking with Someone with Hearing Loss https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/tips-for-speaking-with-someone-with-hearing-loss/

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@gulzar

My hearing loss is so sever in high frequency l don't think hearing aids helps, at Costco they have Resound around $2900 but they don't have trail period to try it. I like to know if someone similar to my hearing loss what helped him/her.

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Doesn't your State law require that you get a trial period? Every State that I have lived in does…In Washington there is a trial period of at least 30 days. Costco would have to abide by your State law.

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@rosemarya

My husband has hearing loss, and he wears hearing aids. He has worn them for 8 years. He still has to remind me when he cannot hear me. I can always tell when he needs to get them adjusted because he turns up the TV and stereo to a level that is uncomfortable to me.

I 'know' that he cannot hear me if I am behind him, or if there is background noise, but I forget, and he has to keep reminding me. It is a team effort of patience and learning to adjust and accept the hearing loss.
The thing that annoys me is when he responds to something that I said with a 'yes' or 'okay', only to find out later that he had no idea of what I had said. I used to accuse him of not listening – until he was diagnosed with the hearing loss. When he purchased the hearing aids, it was the cost that really grabbed our attention. No more denial!

@golden418, it is possible that your wife does not understand what it is like to have a hearing loss. My husband has explained that he doesn't hear when..; or it sounds like…; or I can't understand … I am still learning that it has to be an ongoing adjustment for both of us. The other thing is that when hearing loss comes on gradually, it can be harder for family and friends to ignore.

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If he gets Telecoil (a free setting activated in his hearing aids) he can use it to watch TV. Telecoil should be free — ask your hearing provider. It is easy to buy a neck loop on Amazon & long audio cord–that plugs into any "headphone jack". The neckloop I bought for $60 was the Clear Sounds CLA7-V2 Amplified Power Neckloop on amazon.

My hearing aid provider provided (at a cost!) a clip-on mike which my mother would use–for me to hear her. She wore it all the time and It was just wonderful!

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@judymartin

@golden418 I belong to the Hearing Loss Association of America, and if you would go to their website, hearing loss.org, you will find many resources for your spouse to read.

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HLAA website is hearingloss.org

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@golden418

Does anyone have any literature or other source of information that a spouse can read concerning hearing loss of the other spouse with tips for them to cope with it? My wife just does not understand my hearing loss (deaf in right ear / moderate to sever in the left) – I think she just does not understand what it is as she has perfect hearing.

Jump to this post

In encourage you to connect with The Hearing Loss Assn. of America (HLAA) hearingloss.org You will find solutions the pros never discuss with you because they come from trial and error with other people who have hearing loss. Seriously. A lot of HLAA discussions relate to relationships. In spite of the high incidence of hearing loss, there are still way too many myths about it, along with super high doses of stigma! In other words, we aren't understood, and by not openly discussing it we allow that stigma thing to grow. Most people with typical hearing think that hearing aids 'correct' hearing loss. They don't. Many think we can hear when we want to. Not true, but it often appears that way. People with typical hearing do not know how hard those of us with hearing loss work to hear, and that it's exhausting. When we are fatigued, it's hard to concentrate the way we need to, so we are inclined to drop out of conversations. We miss things that our hearing partners think we heard all the time! It helps so much to meet other people with hearing loss as it gets us out of our personal hearing loss closets….and lets us talk about it with people to 'get it'. So many of our personal issues can be resolved by being understood….but we have to understand ourselves first. You are not alone with hearing loss, but it often feels that way.

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@julieo4

In encourage you to connect with The Hearing Loss Assn. of America (HLAA) hearingloss.org You will find solutions the pros never discuss with you because they come from trial and error with other people who have hearing loss. Seriously. A lot of HLAA discussions relate to relationships. In spite of the high incidence of hearing loss, there are still way too many myths about it, along with super high doses of stigma! In other words, we aren't understood, and by not openly discussing it we allow that stigma thing to grow. Most people with typical hearing think that hearing aids 'correct' hearing loss. They don't. Many think we can hear when we want to. Not true, but it often appears that way. People with typical hearing do not know how hard those of us with hearing loss work to hear, and that it's exhausting. When we are fatigued, it's hard to concentrate the way we need to, so we are inclined to drop out of conversations. We miss things that our hearing partners think we heard all the time! It helps so much to meet other people with hearing loss as it gets us out of our personal hearing loss closets….and lets us talk about it with people to 'get it'. So many of our personal issues can be resolved by being understood….but we have to understand ourselves first. You are not alone with hearing loss, but it often feels that way.

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@julieo4 Thank you for your post, you expressed this so well. People without hearing loss simply do not understand. I do drop out sometimes, it's senseless to try to understand what people are saying when a number of people are in a room talking. It can be quite depressing at times.
My hearing aids are Oticon and I have their "Connect Clip" and it does help when trying to hear one person.
JK

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I agree with you 100% as it took me close to 10 years to feel comfortable with my loss and to ask others to accommodate my requests to go to quieter restaurants or let me sit by wall or in middle of table so I can hear both sides.

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