Hearing loss and memory

Posted by JK, Volunteer Mentor @contentandwell, Mon, Oct 21 11:13pm

I just came across this and found it to be very interesting, and frankly it makes me feel a bit better about my difficulty in remembering things that people say.
https://www.huffpost.com/entry/does-hearing-loss-make-it-harder-to-remember-things_b_589a2f19e4b02bbb1816c098
JK

@contentandwell

Oh my gosh so true. I always tell people that the reason we ask for repeats is because we are so busy struggling to hear each word that we don’t always comprehend immediately and that it’s a two step process for us. I never thought to relate it to short term memory. Years ago people relied on me to remember names . Now I’m the one always asking. I seem to automatically repeat some things I hear. Does anyone else do that?

Yup…feel better and learned something new. And I thought I knew everything about hearing loss😉

FL Mary

REPLY

The eternal struggle to comprehend (not hear–comprehend) what is being spoken means that I lose what I learned during the first sentence as I marshall every brain cell I have to comprehend the second…and the third, etc. I not only cannot remember names but details, even of things that I already know quite a bit about. I often am in lengthy meetings where technical issues about fish and their habitats are discussed. These are topics I've been involved in for decades and know very well, but, after two or three (or more) hours of discussion and note taking, I'm at a loss to summarize what I heard.

Because this degree of loss is quite recent (end of May this year), I find that I'm exhausted most of the time–not because I've done lots of physical activities or failed to get enough sleep, but just from the struggle to understand. In fact, one day I spent 4 hours driving and 6 hours hiking in difficult terrain, all entirely by myself. At the end of that day, I wasn't nearly as tired as I am after a 2-3 hour meeting sitting on my butt! If someone walks past while I'm working in the yard and initiates a 10-minute discussion, I'm tired afterwards. Just a few minutes of making the effort to comprehend is a challenge.

I'm sure that part of my exhaustion is due to depression caused by not being able to understand in small group situations, like around a table for 8 or 10. I feel cheated when I can see that everyone is having a lively discussion but I can only understand occasional words. Of course, a good deal of my problem isn't that I can't hear at all, but that, due to Meniere's, what I hear is so distorted some days that it's just babble punctuated by hurtful spikes of sound. Add fluctuation (sometimes I can hear and understand, but other times I can't even tolerate wearing an aid due to recruitment and distortion), which makes it even harder for people around me to be patient on the days when hearing/comprehension are at very low levels. An hour ago, I might have been able to participate in a one-on-one conversation, but at the moment I cannot, which is very confusing to everyone–including me!

REPLY

@joyces What you write is so true, and I especially relate to your last paragraph. When my son and daughter are visiting with their spouses, just sitting around the family room, I miss almost everything being said. It is depressing and tiring. They are generally only here at the same time during the Christmas holidays. Last year at one point I politely excused myself from the conversation and took out my IPad. My son tries to be extremely accommodating, I have the Oticon Connect Clip, a little microphone that he asks to wear and his voice is streamed directly into my hearing aids but that doesn't help much with the rest of the group. I think this link is a good one to forward to my family so they will understand a bit better. Also, we go out to dinner frequently with another couple. The men will be talking and the other husband has a booming voice. If I forget to bring my Connect Clip I can only hear about a third of what the wife says. Thankfully she used to teach deaf children and she had a deaf aunt so she is very understanding.

My loss is quite different from yours, I am just getting familiar with Meniere's on this forum. I have had a hearing loss requiring HAs since around 2004, and it has gotten progressively worse with clarity suffering greatly in the last few years. My husband tells me these hearing aids do not work that well. I keep trying to tell him, it's not the HAs, it's my hearing that doesn't work well.

As you say, it really is exhausting to be in social situations. My son got married in August and although the festivities were fun, they were also exhausting and depressing for me due to my hearing loss.

@imallears I do not automatically repeat things, but it is a great idea. I think I will try to remember to do that.
JK

Liked by imallears, alice44

REPLY

I've been working in a noisy production setting all of my adult life, and have been aware of my own memory difficulties. I'm quite disappointed that audiologists haven't addressed this issue with me. I get very frustrated when learning new tasks. This processing disorder explains the frustrations and could be dangerous. It also explains why hearing aids sometimes fail to help and then end up unused.

REPLY
@joyces

The eternal struggle to comprehend (not hear–comprehend) what is being spoken means that I lose what I learned during the first sentence as I marshall every brain cell I have to comprehend the second…and the third, etc. I not only cannot remember names but details, even of things that I already know quite a bit about. I often am in lengthy meetings where technical issues about fish and their habitats are discussed. These are topics I've been involved in for decades and know very well, but, after two or three (or more) hours of discussion and note taking, I'm at a loss to summarize what I heard.

Because this degree of loss is quite recent (end of May this year), I find that I'm exhausted most of the time–not because I've done lots of physical activities or failed to get enough sleep, but just from the struggle to understand. In fact, one day I spent 4 hours driving and 6 hours hiking in difficult terrain, all entirely by myself. At the end of that day, I wasn't nearly as tired as I am after a 2-3 hour meeting sitting on my butt! If someone walks past while I'm working in the yard and initiates a 10-minute discussion, I'm tired afterwards. Just a few minutes of making the effort to comprehend is a challenge.

I'm sure that part of my exhaustion is due to depression caused by not being able to understand in small group situations, like around a table for 8 or 10. I feel cheated when I can see that everyone is having a lively discussion but I can only understand occasional words. Of course, a good deal of my problem isn't that I can't hear at all, but that, due to Meniere's, what I hear is so distorted some days that it's just babble punctuated by hurtful spikes of sound. Add fluctuation (sometimes I can hear and understand, but other times I can't even tolerate wearing an aid due to recruitment and distortion), which makes it even harder for people around me to be patient on the days when hearing/comprehension are at very low levels. An hour ago, I might have been able to participate in a one-on-one conversation, but at the moment I cannot, which is very confusing to everyone–including me!

Jump to this post

@joyces
Hi,
Since you are so new to hearing loss, you may be trying too hard . Go easy on yourself and try not to expect too much. I’ve had a progressive loss over 40 years and have had time to adjust. Yeah, it still annoys me that I miss out on so much but…as I will be sitting around the table this Thanksgiving with my entire family…even though I’m not getting everything, I’m so happy to be where I am .

It will take a while for you to come to terms with hearing loss, but realize that you can only do so much. Keep going to the Audi for adjustments and try new assisted devices and hearing apps. (I rely heavily on Live Transcribe for my phone….Android phones only). You’ll learn how you have to plan in advance your approach to people and new situations….even a simple trip to a new doctor.

I don’t have recruitment but understand it and it does make things difficult. Distortion is a killer. Alone time is good but don’t isolate yourself too much…you need to keep your brain active . You have to practice listening to keep as much understanding as you can. You will develop a quick explanation of your loss to explain to others but be upbeat about it if you can.

None of this is your fault but it’s too easy to fall into depression. Keep yourself surrounded by family and good friends and learn when to step away. People gravitate towards positive people…..you can do everything others do expect hear well but don’t let that fact dominate your life even though it impacts everything you do. Read about what other people who have physical challenges have done.

You’ll get there…..not easy…don’t make it a handicap.

FL Mary

REPLY
@jymm

I've been working in a noisy production setting all of my adult life, and have been aware of my own memory difficulties. I'm quite disappointed that audiologists haven't addressed this issue with me. I get very frustrated when learning new tasks. This processing disorder explains the frustrations and could be dangerous. It also explains why hearing aids sometimes fail to help and then end up unused.

Jump to this post

@jymm
People don’t understand cognitive overload and I know of many who have put their hearing aids away into a drawer. They’ve not given them a chance or expect too much out of them. It behooves us to learn about how our ears work…how our brain works…how it affects our lives. Your Audi won’t tell you all this…it’s not that an experienced Audi doesn’t know but that they are trying to get the best possible listening environment for you….in the office. We have to educate them and let them know what we are experiencing out in the real world so they can think about it and pass it on to others.

There’s only so much hearing aids and audiologists can do. I happen to have a small window for adjustments since I have a profound loss. I know this because my Audi told me this and she and I have developed a wonderful rapport. She is unusual because she wants to know about personal experiences and is extremely patient.

She knew about memory difficulty. I’m not sure how much she explains to others but then so many people don’t do research about their own loss and don’t know what questions to ask or how to explain their difficulties and frustrations.

I could literally write a book about this subject so will end right here.

Good days and bad days
FL Mary

REPLY
@joyces

The eternal struggle to comprehend (not hear–comprehend) what is being spoken means that I lose what I learned during the first sentence as I marshall every brain cell I have to comprehend the second…and the third, etc. I not only cannot remember names but details, even of things that I already know quite a bit about. I often am in lengthy meetings where technical issues about fish and their habitats are discussed. These are topics I've been involved in for decades and know very well, but, after two or three (or more) hours of discussion and note taking, I'm at a loss to summarize what I heard.

Because this degree of loss is quite recent (end of May this year), I find that I'm exhausted most of the time–not because I've done lots of physical activities or failed to get enough sleep, but just from the struggle to understand. In fact, one day I spent 4 hours driving and 6 hours hiking in difficult terrain, all entirely by myself. At the end of that day, I wasn't nearly as tired as I am after a 2-3 hour meeting sitting on my butt! If someone walks past while I'm working in the yard and initiates a 10-minute discussion, I'm tired afterwards. Just a few minutes of making the effort to comprehend is a challenge.

I'm sure that part of my exhaustion is due to depression caused by not being able to understand in small group situations, like around a table for 8 or 10. I feel cheated when I can see that everyone is having a lively discussion but I can only understand occasional words. Of course, a good deal of my problem isn't that I can't hear at all, but that, due to Meniere's, what I hear is so distorted some days that it's just babble punctuated by hurtful spikes of sound. Add fluctuation (sometimes I can hear and understand, but other times I can't even tolerate wearing an aid due to recruitment and distortion), which makes it even harder for people around me to be patient on the days when hearing/comprehension are at very low levels. An hour ago, I might have been able to participate in a one-on-one conversation, but at the moment I cannot, which is very confusing to everyone–including me!

Jump to this post

Powerful comment mirrors my comprehension problems, depression, anxiety and exhaustion exactly. Situations might be not be the same, the experience we share is, certainly. Thank you. I am going to have a cochlear implant because I am sick of not understanding overall content in the situations you describe, sick of the depression/exhaustion, sick of my grandchildren looking at me with confusion, and sick of loosing out! Anything will be an improvement.

REPLY
@imallears

@joyces
Hi,
Since you are so new to hearing loss, you may be trying too hard . Go easy on yourself and try not to expect too much. I’ve had a progressive loss over 40 years and have had time to adjust. Yeah, it still annoys me that I miss out on so much but…as I will be sitting around the table this Thanksgiving with my entire family…even though I’m not getting everything, I’m so happy to be where I am .

It will take a while for you to come to terms with hearing loss, but realize that you can only do so much. Keep going to the Audi for adjustments and try new assisted devices and hearing apps. (I rely heavily on Live Transcribe for my phone….Android phones only). You’ll learn how you have to plan in advance your approach to people and new situations….even a simple trip to a new doctor.

I don’t have recruitment but understand it and it does make things difficult. Distortion is a killer. Alone time is good but don’t isolate yourself too much…you need to keep your brain active . You have to practice listening to keep as much understanding as you can. You will develop a quick explanation of your loss to explain to others but be upbeat about it if you can.

None of this is your fault but it’s too easy to fall into depression. Keep yourself surrounded by family and good friends and learn when to step away. People gravitate towards positive people…..you can do everything others do expect hear well but don’t let that fact dominate your life even though it impacts everything you do. Read about what other people who have physical challenges have done.

You’ll get there…..not easy…don’t make it a handicap.

FL Mary

Jump to this post

@imallears @joyces Great suggestion from FL Mary – "Alone time is good but don’t isolate yourself too much…you need to keep your brain active". There is more and more evidence that hearing problems can contribute to dementia due to lack of stimulation. It makes me wonder, if you are getting stimulation by other means, such as online forums like this, does that counteract the lack of oral stimulation? I think it probably does.
When I am doing something else I never think about my lack of hearing comprehension, I only think of it when I am in that situation, so I am not depressed constantly at all. Admittedly though, when in a social environment it is depressing and frustrating. We do what we can do and hope for the best.
Joyce, what kind of hearing aids do you have? I know Phonak has some great devices to stream conversation directly to your HAs. I have Oticon and the Connect Clip they have but it only helps with streaming one person into my aids. Phonak has a device that you can put in the middle of the table and it streams everyone to your aids. My audiologist is getting me some of these aids for me to "test drive" them in December. They would have to be extraordinary for me to invest in new aids at this point. My Oticons are less than three years old and I paid about $6000 for them so another expenditure like that would be almost impossible, unless as I said, the difference was extraordinary. Then I would make the sacrifice.

Liked by imallears

REPLY
@lizzy102

Powerful comment mirrors my comprehension problems, depression, anxiety and exhaustion exactly. Situations might be not be the same, the experience we share is, certainly. Thank you. I am going to have a cochlear implant because I am sick of not understanding overall content in the situations you describe, sick of the depression/exhaustion, sick of my grandchildren looking at me with confusion, and sick of loosing out! Anything will be an improvement.

Jump to this post

@lizzy102 I hope you will keep us informed as you undergo the transition to a CI. I think it is something that many of us may have in the future, I suspect I do so I will be very interested in hearing about it first-hand.
When are you having the surgery for this? I sincerely wish it gives you all of the help you are hoping for.
JK

Liked by imallears

REPLY
@lizzy102

Powerful comment mirrors my comprehension problems, depression, anxiety and exhaustion exactly. Situations might be not be the same, the experience we share is, certainly. Thank you. I am going to have a cochlear implant because I am sick of not understanding overall content in the situations you describe, sick of the depression/exhaustion, sick of my grandchildren looking at me with confusion, and sick of loosing out! Anything will be an improvement.

Jump to this post

@izzy102
Hi,
I also hope the CI is successful for you and I am SO interested in your upcoming journey. I have been contemplating one for my left bad ear but am truthfully not there yet. I have a metal clip in my right eye since the 80s from a detached retina and am fearful of the magnet effect of the CI. Not sure if my Ophthalmologist would have a clue about that. Perhaps , when it comes time I’ll need more information .
Anyway…..good luck and please keep us posted . I know there is a long journey yet after the implant.

FL Mary

Liked by lioness

REPLY
@imallears

@joyces
Hi,
Since you are so new to hearing loss, you may be trying too hard . Go easy on yourself and try not to expect too much. I’ve had a progressive loss over 40 years and have had time to adjust. Yeah, it still annoys me that I miss out on so much but…as I will be sitting around the table this Thanksgiving with my entire family…even though I’m not getting everything, I’m so happy to be where I am .

It will take a while for you to come to terms with hearing loss, but realize that you can only do so much. Keep going to the Audi for adjustments and try new assisted devices and hearing apps. (I rely heavily on Live Transcribe for my phone….Android phones only). You’ll learn how you have to plan in advance your approach to people and new situations….even a simple trip to a new doctor.

I don’t have recruitment but understand it and it does make things difficult. Distortion is a killer. Alone time is good but don’t isolate yourself too much…you need to keep your brain active . You have to practice listening to keep as much understanding as you can. You will develop a quick explanation of your loss to explain to others but be upbeat about it if you can.

None of this is your fault but it’s too easy to fall into depression. Keep yourself surrounded by family and good friends and learn when to step away. People gravitate towards positive people…..you can do everything others do expect hear well but don’t let that fact dominate your life even though it impacts everything you do. Read about what other people who have physical challenges have done.

You’ll get there…..not easy…don’t make it a handicap.

FL Mary

Jump to this post

@FL Mary
Actually, I'm not new to hearing loss, just to this degree of it. The Meniere's monster struck big time when I was in my 40s, but only in my right ear. I lost useful hearing as well as balance function in that ear. For four years, I never knew when the horrible vertigo would hit, meaning a few minutes warning before 12-15 hours of vomiting. Back then, there was little knowledge about VRT (vestibular rehab). Docs thought that you couldn't do it while you were having crises. Now, they know that's not correct. My lifetime of playing in ensembles and orchestras came to a crashing halt; for 30 years, I couldn't stand to listen to music because I wasn't hearing what I knew I should hear. I channeled my need to be creative into other activities: intense book design, learning to knit complex Aran patterns, more painting and drawing. I became a moderator for an online discussion group about the disease, which led to designing/editing/publishing three books about vestibular disorders.

As the years went by, I had more and more age-related deafness in my "good" left ear. After a hearing test, the tech said, "You aren't hearing anything in your right ear, and your left isn't so hot, either." My father was profoundly deaf, but we always were able to communicate as we worked together, remodeling houses, fishing, cutting firewood. Mother had no hearing in one ear due to an accident, and she always expected people around her to shape their behavior to her loss. I determined I'd follow Dad's example and place myself in the best place to hear, learn to read lips, etc. Although my hearing continued to deteriorate, I learned to be proactive in placing myself to the right of people, reading lips (now called "speech reading"), guessing at the words I didn't hear. There wasn't distortion or recruitment, so, if I heard sound, I could understand. Over a year ago, I bought an aid for my left ear.

Then May 24 happened, and the Meniere's monster struck again. I had had some signs of problems in my left ear, but nothing serious. In one instant that day, sound went away and distortion and recruitment moved in. One of the very frustrating aspects of Meniere's is that your ability to hear and understand fluctuates from day to day, even hour to hour or minute to minute. Some days, I can hear almost as well as I could before May 24, although the sounds I hear are very distorted. Other days, I can't hear well enough to be bothered by distortion, but recruitment is severe, actually knifes through my skull. I never know how much I'll be able to figure out on any given day. People see me on a good day and think I've gotten much better…and then are amazed when they see me on a really bad day. Even on good days, when I can hear quite a bit, sound is very distorted. I can hear that people are speaking, but only understand a word here and there. The jumble of sound makes it hard to speech read; I think the mess that I hear overrides what I see. Much of the time, I just smile and nod, hoping that some response wasn't expected.

I remain very active. l drive two hours each way to the Portland area to load 400-600 loaves of donated bread every week, even though most of what the people say, either in the warehouse or when I deliver bread to local homeless charities the next day, is a mystery. I'm Curriculum Director for a lecture series, setting up 48 or more lectures per term. Fortunately, much of the organization is via e-mail. Now I always sit in the front row toward the right of the room, with a mic to boost my aid. It's fine as long as the speaker stays near the podium and has a good Powerpoint. I also chair a workgroup about instream water needs for a pilot project that will determine how water is used in Oregon in the future. Workgroup meetings are difficult: lots of technical info. For the November meeting, I rearranged the tables into a smaller area, which helped. I switched to an Android phone because I tried Otter during our last meeting and found that it was close to useless for technical terms. Of course, I didn't know that I'd lose "in the ear" directions while driving with the Android, even though I had researched the various phones. I'm still learning to use this new phone. I had only used a flip phone until recently, when I got an older IPhone to use as a GPS unit for the instream data collection project I set up decades ago and still work for. Biggest challenge is meetings of the entire water group, usually a hundred people or more, often in a difficult setting. I really didn't hear one single understandable sentence during the last four-hour meeting of the larger group. I asked one speaker to send me a copy of her PowerPoint, but she declined. Big loss, as her discussion was about instream needs of fish, etc. (I think!)

I'm beginning to believe that another self-help book is necessary: how to learn to live in a quieter world. If anyone out there would like to contribute, let's do it! I'm more than willing to risk the cost of getting it printed, as I represent a Thai printing firm that prints all-color books inexpensively.

REPLY
@contentandwell

@imallears @joyces Great suggestion from FL Mary – "Alone time is good but don’t isolate yourself too much…you need to keep your brain active". There is more and more evidence that hearing problems can contribute to dementia due to lack of stimulation. It makes me wonder, if you are getting stimulation by other means, such as online forums like this, does that counteract the lack of oral stimulation? I think it probably does.
When I am doing something else I never think about my lack of hearing comprehension, I only think of it when I am in that situation, so I am not depressed constantly at all. Admittedly though, when in a social environment it is depressing and frustrating. We do what we can do and hope for the best.
Joyce, what kind of hearing aids do you have? I know Phonak has some great devices to stream conversation directly to your HAs. I have Oticon and the Connect Clip they have but it only helps with streaming one person into my aids. Phonak has a device that you can put in the middle of the table and it streams everyone to your aids. My audiologist is getting me some of these aids for me to "test drive" them in December. They would have to be extraordinary for me to invest in new aids at this point. My Oticons are less than three years old and I paid about $6000 for them so another expenditure like that would be almost impossible, unless as I said, the difference was extraordinary. Then I would make the sacrifice.

Jump to this post

In reply to JK, Volunteer Mentor @contentandwell, "Great suggestion from FL Mary…"

I believe that participating in an online forum or, in my case, doing research for programs, reports, books exercises our brains. For the next term of the lecture series, I'm doing half of a program about Vincent Van Gogh. First, an art expert will talk about his work, and then I'll talk about how he definitely was NOT crazy, just had Meniere's. This counteracts a general belief and two books that confirmed that Van Gogh was mad. Long before a hearing expert read all of his collected letters and confirmed that they reflected Meniere's, I looked at his paintings and knew they were just how I felt much of the time. Members of the learning institute already are aware that my hearing took a big downturn between Spring and Fall terms!

I have one aid for my left ear, a Costco (Oticon). I was tested for a CI, but failed by 5%, i.e., I could understand 55% of simple sentences in a sound booth. That's a long, long way from real life, even when the tech introduced the wind noise, which is much like the constant tinnitus I have in both ears, tuned to different channels. I've read about the Phonak aids and the neat mic that's selective directionally, but the aids and the mic total something like $7,000 or more. My right ear isn't aidable, so if I qualify for a CI at some point, it will be for my long-useless right ear. Although the doc, who in effects SELLS the CI operation, insists that it works for those with Meniere's, I'd want to talk to some Menierians who've had the surgery. I don't quite believe that a CI could overcome the distortion. Not an issue at present, since I don't qualify.

REPLY
@joyces

@FL Mary
Actually, I'm not new to hearing loss, just to this degree of it. The Meniere's monster struck big time when I was in my 40s, but only in my right ear. I lost useful hearing as well as balance function in that ear. For four years, I never knew when the horrible vertigo would hit, meaning a few minutes warning before 12-15 hours of vomiting. Back then, there was little knowledge about VRT (vestibular rehab). Docs thought that you couldn't do it while you were having crises. Now, they know that's not correct. My lifetime of playing in ensembles and orchestras came to a crashing halt; for 30 years, I couldn't stand to listen to music because I wasn't hearing what I knew I should hear. I channeled my need to be creative into other activities: intense book design, learning to knit complex Aran patterns, more painting and drawing. I became a moderator for an online discussion group about the disease, which led to designing/editing/publishing three books about vestibular disorders.

As the years went by, I had more and more age-related deafness in my "good" left ear. After a hearing test, the tech said, "You aren't hearing anything in your right ear, and your left isn't so hot, either." My father was profoundly deaf, but we always were able to communicate as we worked together, remodeling houses, fishing, cutting firewood. Mother had no hearing in one ear due to an accident, and she always expected people around her to shape their behavior to her loss. I determined I'd follow Dad's example and place myself in the best place to hear, learn to read lips, etc. Although my hearing continued to deteriorate, I learned to be proactive in placing myself to the right of people, reading lips (now called "speech reading"), guessing at the words I didn't hear. There wasn't distortion or recruitment, so, if I heard sound, I could understand. Over a year ago, I bought an aid for my left ear.

Then May 24 happened, and the Meniere's monster struck again. I had had some signs of problems in my left ear, but nothing serious. In one instant that day, sound went away and distortion and recruitment moved in. One of the very frustrating aspects of Meniere's is that your ability to hear and understand fluctuates from day to day, even hour to hour or minute to minute. Some days, I can hear almost as well as I could before May 24, although the sounds I hear are very distorted. Other days, I can't hear well enough to be bothered by distortion, but recruitment is severe, actually knifes through my skull. I never know how much I'll be able to figure out on any given day. People see me on a good day and think I've gotten much better…and then are amazed when they see me on a really bad day. Even on good days, when I can hear quite a bit, sound is very distorted. I can hear that people are speaking, but only understand a word here and there. The jumble of sound makes it hard to speech read; I think the mess that I hear overrides what I see. Much of the time, I just smile and nod, hoping that some response wasn't expected.

I remain very active. l drive two hours each way to the Portland area to load 400-600 loaves of donated bread every week, even though most of what the people say, either in the warehouse or when I deliver bread to local homeless charities the next day, is a mystery. I'm Curriculum Director for a lecture series, setting up 48 or more lectures per term. Fortunately, much of the organization is via e-mail. Now I always sit in the front row toward the right of the room, with a mic to boost my aid. It's fine as long as the speaker stays near the podium and has a good Powerpoint. I also chair a workgroup about instream water needs for a pilot project that will determine how water is used in Oregon in the future. Workgroup meetings are difficult: lots of technical info. For the November meeting, I rearranged the tables into a smaller area, which helped. I switched to an Android phone because I tried Otter during our last meeting and found that it was close to useless for technical terms. Of course, I didn't know that I'd lose "in the ear" directions while driving with the Android, even though I had researched the various phones. I'm still learning to use this new phone. I had only used a flip phone until recently, when I got an older IPhone to use as a GPS unit for the instream data collection project I set up decades ago and still work for. Biggest challenge is meetings of the entire water group, usually a hundred people or more, often in a difficult setting. I really didn't hear one single understandable sentence during the last four-hour meeting of the larger group. I asked one speaker to send me a copy of her PowerPoint, but she declined. Big loss, as her discussion was about instream needs of fish, etc. (I think!)

I'm beginning to believe that another self-help book is necessary: how to learn to live in a quieter world. If anyone out there would like to contribute, let's do it! I'm more than willing to risk the cost of getting it printed, as I represent a Thai printing firm that prints all-color books inexpensively.

Jump to this post

@joyces I admire how active you are. I was much more active before I had cirrhosis and now, being older, have never returned to that level of activity. Beyond online activities my biggest activity is going to my health club for the gym and on alternate the pool. I believe that being as active as possible is good for a person in very many ways.

I agree, I think these activities like forums or anything that exercises our brains is definitely beneficial in staving off dementia.

That's very interesting about Van Gogh. The various influences on the impressionist painters are very telling.
JK

Liked by imallears

REPLY

@joyces

Well, you floored me….you are beyond active….got tired reading all the things you are involved with. Known about Van Gogh for years…thanks for bringing that up….it’s such an interesting thing to tell people. Love the idea of a book about learning to live in a quieter world. Was wondering if there are similar books on this topic already published.
I’ve worn Phonaks for years and switch to the directional mic program quite often. I encourage you to try Live Transcribe for your Android phone. I did not care for Otter. The app is not perfect by any means but I have found it a tremendous help in many situations. When my granddaughter graduated high school in May, I “heard “ the entire graduation program because there was one person at a time at the mic. Same with a separate awards ceremony. I was about 7 to 8 rows away in an auditorium and just held the phone in my lap. I’ve used it in my doctors office so I don’t miss anything. It keeps the conversation for 3 days. I’ve used it when a salesperson has an accent. It’s free.
I switch to Tcoil when using GPS on my phone in the car…I have earlinks that slip over the hearing aid behind the ear. ..not made anymore however. I have a hearing loop that, if I slide it up closer to my head I can hear the voice. I don’t understand it but I am looking at the directions and it is an audible clue for me.
I’ve trialed several assisted devices associated with Phonak , except for the Roger products , and have not found them helpful at all. I can’t imagine adding Menieres and recruitment to an existing hearing loss. Looking about over your post, I would most likely go the CI route myself. I just need to reassured about the magnet’s effect on my eye.

I think you are amazing! I do believe that app would help in meetings….if you could slide it around the table….worth a shot.

FL Mary

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@imallears

@joyces

Well, you floored me….you are beyond active….got tired reading all the things you are involved with. Known about Van Gogh for years…thanks for bringing that up….it’s such an interesting thing to tell people. Love the idea of a book about learning to live in a quieter world. Was wondering if there are similar books on this topic already published.
I’ve worn Phonaks for years and switch to the directional mic program quite often. I encourage you to try Live Transcribe for your Android phone. I did not care for Otter. The app is not perfect by any means but I have found it a tremendous help in many situations. When my granddaughter graduated high school in May, I “heard “ the entire graduation program because there was one person at a time at the mic. Same with a separate awards ceremony. I was about 7 to 8 rows away in an auditorium and just held the phone in my lap. I’ve used it in my doctors office so I don’t miss anything. It keeps the conversation for 3 days. I’ve used it when a salesperson has an accent. It’s free.
I switch to Tcoil when using GPS on my phone in the car…I have earlinks that slip over the hearing aid behind the ear. ..not made anymore however. I have a hearing loop that, if I slide it up closer to my head I can hear the voice. I don’t understand it but I am looking at the directions and it is an audible clue for me.
I’ve trialed several assisted devices associated with Phonak , except for the Roger products , and have not found them helpful at all. I can’t imagine adding Menieres and recruitment to an existing hearing loss. Looking about over your post, I would most likely go the CI route myself. I just need to reassured about the magnet’s effect on my eye.

I think you are amazing! I do believe that app would help in meetings….if you could slide it around the table….worth a shot.

FL Mary

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Next meeting of the Instream workgroup is next Tuesday, and I intend to test drive Live Transcribe during it. I need to practice with it first, but just trying it out with TV it seems far, far better than Otter. I used Otter during one meeting, and found that it lagged far behind the actual conversation plus just couldn't "understand" any of the tech terms. It was downright useless, even looking at it afterwards to try to recapture some of what I'd missed. I bought a cheap tablet three months ago, downloaded Live Transcribe, but found that the tablet had a virtually useless mic. That led me to exploring options for mics, bought one paired to my aid, but just gave up on the tablet. I figure if I keep throwing $$$ at the problem, I'll find something that works for me!

Big problems are being tired all the time and being so caught up in trying to understand that I CRS (you know, can't remember S***)! As I get closer to, yikes, 80, perhaps the memory thing is just part of the overall picture, but it certainly has ramped up since my hearing went further south. I wonder if I'll still be loading 600-700 pounds of bread every week, or driving for a couple of hours to do instream data collection work on a wild little river when I turn 80…

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