Hearing aid brands that are made specifically for the iphone

Posted by raykraemer @raykraemer, Jan 5 12:46pm

I was told by a major well known HA brand support person that the brand I am trying out is not made specifically for the iphone (IPHONE SE in this case), that my brand is more generic for all cell phones. I'm having problems with bluetooth connectivity constantly and it never goes away. I was told of two brands of HAs that are specifically made for iphone compatability, and they are Oticon and Starkey. Does anyone out there know anything about HA brands that are made specifically for compatability with the iphones?

@raykraemer I have a Starkey from the VA… I do not have an Iphone.. and the Starkey remote mic (bluetooth) works very well with my Starkey HA on a call…. My present phone is a Moto G7. the VA Audiologist said that an Iphone and most others work better with my hearing aid than with my phone.. I am going to get a new phone soon.. as soon as the price calms down a bit… During this isolation the phone hearing aid connection has made all the difference in feelings of isolation.. Ken

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Hi, I have Widex aids that are iPhone only compatible and the bluetooth works well. Newer models will br Android compatible going forwards I am told, That said they do occasionally drop connection. You should get someone to show you how to reconnect if the connections go wrong. It will happen at some point. You also may need to refresh the connection if things are going strangely.

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@raykraemer My 2 year old Resound hearing aids are Made for iPhone. My phone is the iPhone 6S plus and I do not have connectivity problems.
Tony in Michigan

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My Resound Hearing aids are 5+ years old and I have an iPhone 8 that streams right into both of my aids. I have four programs and use all of them for different reasons and environments. Streaming is the way to go.

Liked by sparklegram

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My Rexon's were bought 3 years ago. They worked great with my iPhone. Just switched to an android and no connection. No warning from provider (Costco). Bluetooth support supposed to be coming.

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I have Oticon OPN and they work well with my iPhone 6. Both are due for replacement next month so I'm paying attention to this thread.

I'm also wondering when LP Audio (low power audio bluetooth) will be available and on which brands of hearing aids. LP Audio will allow a bluetooth connection to multiple devices at the same time and with better sound quality.

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@arrowshooter

I have Oticon OPN and they work well with my iPhone 6. Both are due for replacement next month so I'm paying attention to this thread.

I'm also wondering when LP Audio (low power audio bluetooth) will be available and on which brands of hearing aids. LP Audio will allow a bluetooth connection to multiple devices at the same time and with better sound quality.

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@arrowshooter I think you mean LE Audio. This is a Bluetooth specification that is in development. I will be following this also. It will most likely determine my next hearing aid purchase. I'm hoping it can make a noticeable improvement on speech from the smartphone. Here's a link that explains the Bluetooth specification with some video's https://www.bluetooth.com/learn-about-bluetooth/recent-enhancements/le-audio/
Note that the video's are captioned but they are OFF by default. Click the CC button to turn them on.
Tony in Michigan

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Yes, it is LE Audio that I was referring to. I think it is the same thing as I heard about (LP Audio). And what I read implied that it would be available in 2021 in hearing aids. However that doesn't mean they will be on the market or that they will be trouble free. I might put off getting my new hearing aids until this is available. It is certainly worth watching.

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@artdel

My Rexon's were bought 3 years ago. They worked great with my iPhone. Just switched to an android and no connection. No warning from provider (Costco). Bluetooth support supposed to be coming.

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@artdel My android phone (a MotoG7) works with my Starkey Hearing Aids by using an APP called "Thrive" … When I first was fitted and programmed for my HA, the audiologist said that for some reason many facets of the connection between phone and hearing aids would not be available.. I intend to get a new smart phone soon.. What other APPs are used with various brands of phones?

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@ken82

@artdel My android phone (a MotoG7) works with my Starkey Hearing Aids by using an APP called "Thrive" … When I first was fitted and programmed for my HA, the audiologist said that for some reason many facets of the connection between phone and hearing aids would not be available.. I intend to get a new smart phone soon.. What other APPs are used with various brands of phones?

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@ken82 Many years ago, when I still had a flip phone, I learned that the hearing aid manufacturers were targeting compatibility with the iPhone platform first. The reasoning was simplicity. There were not a lot of variants of Apple phones as there are with Androids, which are made by many different companies. The "Made for iPhone" hearing aids came out first. They used Bluetooth Low Energy, which was an Apple proprietary system (from what I understood). Standard Bluetooth uses a lot of power. At the time, I bought an iPhone knowing that the hearing aid manufacturers were going to make their products compatible. I always preferred to go the cheaper route and would have bought an Android. I'm glad I made the investment. There have been a lot of changes but the feature that you may want to look for, if you wear two aids, are Streaming to BOTH hearing aids. The newer aids can do this but I'm not sure how much these drain the battery when using the phone.
Tony in Michigan

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@tonyinmi

@ken82 Many years ago, when I still had a flip phone, I learned that the hearing aid manufacturers were targeting compatibility with the iPhone platform first. The reasoning was simplicity. There were not a lot of variants of Apple phones as there are with Androids, which are made by many different companies. The "Made for iPhone" hearing aids came out first. They used Bluetooth Low Energy, which was an Apple proprietary system (from what I understood). Standard Bluetooth uses a lot of power. At the time, I bought an iPhone knowing that the hearing aid manufacturers were going to make their products compatible. I always preferred to go the cheaper route and would have bought an Android. I'm glad I made the investment. There have been a lot of changes but the feature that you may want to look for, if you wear two aids, are Streaming to BOTH hearing aids. The newer aids can do this but I'm not sure how much these drain the battery when using the phone.
Tony in Michigan

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@tonyinmi I have 2 hearing aids but the left one just broadcasts to the right one.. my better ear.. my left ear is just decoration… So when I am home alone… these days .. I just wear my right HA… I have been looking at a Samsung Galaxy 20 note as I do alot of sketches…(architect) background.. but will do some more research… Thanks.. Ken

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IPhone vs. Samsung Galaxy 20: I had an IPhone, switched to the Samsung in order to have Live Transcribe (available for Androids only). The one thing that the Samsung does better is driving directions. Not only are most places, even the road only we live on, pronounced correctly, but the Samsung is able to adapt when you stop at a rest stop or a store. However, that's the one good thing! The Samsung, even set to only notify you of new texts or calls, frequently announces its presence regardless. GPS apps and abilities, esp. where there's no reception, aren't as good as good as what was available for IPhone. Most important, the ability to switch to phone mode for calls is easier with the IPhone and calls seem a little clearer. If I lived in a place where we had cell reception, I probably would have switched back to an IPhone. However, since we have zero cell reception here, I've stick with the Android for over a year. My biggest reason to switch back would be to have better GPS; I do volunteer work for our state fisheries agency and really need GPS. The slightly better/easier phone use doesn't matter much due to our lack of reception at home. I also confess to not liking Macs so hated to be part of the "I" everything group.

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@tonyinmi

@ken82 Many years ago, when I still had a flip phone, I learned that the hearing aid manufacturers were targeting compatibility with the iPhone platform first. The reasoning was simplicity. There were not a lot of variants of Apple phones as there are with Androids, which are made by many different companies. The "Made for iPhone" hearing aids came out first. They used Bluetooth Low Energy, which was an Apple proprietary system (from what I understood). Standard Bluetooth uses a lot of power. At the time, I bought an iPhone knowing that the hearing aid manufacturers were going to make their products compatible. I always preferred to go the cheaper route and would have bought an Android. I'm glad I made the investment. There have been a lot of changes but the feature that you may want to look for, if you wear two aids, are Streaming to BOTH hearing aids. The newer aids can do this but I'm not sure how much these drain the battery when using the phone.
Tony in Michigan

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Like you Tony – I joined the Apple/Resound bandwagon years ago and bought into the streaming and use of the iPhone. My powerful hearing aids used lots of energy with the phone at the time and within one year, I moved from the 5S to the 7+ just because I needed the power to cover my 4 programs and multiple apps. When my 7+ dropped into my pool last year, it died and so I had to purchase a new phone – so went with the 8+ which has helped keep me juiced up and doing well with the needs I have including the streaming to both ears, apps for captioning and an assortment of other newer platforms that include banking, cooking, reading the paper, virtual care, camera and you know the rest. My batteries are changed weekly and I wear my aids for around 10 hours a day depending on amount of exposure to noise my brain can take given I have migraine syndrome.

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Best check with audiologist.

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I have been an industry professional for 40 years and all modern hearing aids have apps for the iphone. Starkey, Oticon, Siemens, Audina, Widex, Phonak, Unitron, Resound, Bernafon, Sam's Club hearing aids, which are done independently from the Club as they just rent space, were the only hearing aids not compatible with iphones. And Unitron is a more inexpensive brand of Phonak; Rexton is an inexpensive Siemens and used by Costco and will be iphone compatible – I have all these apps on my iphone to help show my patients how they work. The hearing aids can also stream with the TV (a separate connection) and if you stick with any of the above brands you can't go wrong. Often hearing aid stores are owned by the hearing aid manufacturer so your choices can be limited.

Liked by tonyinmi, sunnyone

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