Implantable neurostimulator for chronic pain

Posted by zjandre @zjandre, Apr 13, 2016

Has anybody had an implantable neurostimulator for chronic pain?

Liked by bekie, grandmaR

Thnk u for posting. Im so sorry for your pain. Ive got to say the more i read the more i do not want an implant but theres no plan B

REPLY
@grandmar

I have chronic pain from spinal issues. I went through the trial phase of the spinal stimulator. The person who connected the stimulator did a horrible job. The wires were not attached appropriately and kept shocking me. I had to go to the doctor to meet with the stimulator rep everyday for 3 days. They did not do anything. As a result, I did not go for it.
I am currently living in a new state and having a horrible time with my pain. If surgery is not the answer, I would not be surprised if a spinal stimulator will be suggested. I’ll have to think long and hard about it.
Good luck!

Jump to this post

Hi I'm getting the DRG stimulator next week. I'm excited and nervous at the same time. Good to hear its working for you. Are you able to adjust the levels yourself or do you have to get the rep or doctor to do it. Thanks

REPLY
@cjpeterson

The reprogramming is done by the Nevro tech with a wifi connection from her laptop. She places a small transmitter next to you near your implanted device. The more information you can give her about what worked or didn’t work with the program you were using will help these techs pinpoint that sweet spot that gives maximum pain relief. It takes a couple of days for the changes to be absorbed by your nervous system and feel its effect. You can after a couple of days increase the frequency or power to see how that feels. I found it interesting that more power is not always more better when it comes to these implants, Too much power can sometimes cause pain. It is important though to try higher settings just to see how it affects you. It really can feel too high I have found out; it was an odd sensation of just being a little buzzed but not in a good way. I was advised to go back to a lower setting. My implant is in the cervical area or neck and have been told that is bit more sensitive than the lower back. Generally they give you two new programs and keep one that stays the same when changing the leads programming.

Jump to this post

Hello thanks for posts. I wantedto know arr you able to adjust your own levels that makes you comfortable with your pain on your controller. Or do the tech have to do it

REPLY
@cjpeterson

The reprogramming is done by the Nevro tech with a wifi connection from her laptop. She places a small transmitter next to you near your implanted device. The more information you can give her about what worked or didn’t work with the program you were using will help these techs pinpoint that sweet spot that gives maximum pain relief. It takes a couple of days for the changes to be absorbed by your nervous system and feel its effect. You can after a couple of days increase the frequency or power to see how that feels. I found it interesting that more power is not always more better when it comes to these implants, Too much power can sometimes cause pain. It is important though to try higher settings just to see how it affects you. It really can feel too high I have found out; it was an odd sensation of just being a little buzzed but not in a good way. I was advised to go back to a lower setting. My implant is in the cervical area or neck and have been told that is bit more sensitive than the lower back. Generally they give you two new programs and keep one that stays the same when changing the leads programming.

Jump to this post

No but I have a pain pump implanted in my stomach that leaks Dilaudid into my spine, I love it

REPLY
@cjpeterson

The reprogramming is done by the Nevro tech with a wifi connection from her laptop. She places a small transmitter next to you near your implanted device. The more information you can give her about what worked or didn’t work with the program you were using will help these techs pinpoint that sweet spot that gives maximum pain relief. It takes a couple of days for the changes to be absorbed by your nervous system and feel its effect. You can after a couple of days increase the frequency or power to see how that feels. I found it interesting that more power is not always more better when it comes to these implants, Too much power can sometimes cause pain. It is important though to try higher settings just to see how it affects you. It really can feel too high I have found out; it was an odd sensation of just being a little buzzed but not in a good way. I was advised to go back to a lower setting. My implant is in the cervical area or neck and have been told that is bit more sensitive than the lower back. Generally they give you two new programs and keep one that stays the same when changing the leads programming.

Jump to this post

I had a nerve stimulator put in my head at Mayo in Rochester. They will teach you how to use it. The stimulator I had I was able to easily adjust myself just by pressing a few buttons.

REPLY
@cjpeterson

The reprogramming is done by the Nevro tech with a wifi connection from her laptop. She places a small transmitter next to you near your implanted device. The more information you can give her about what worked or didn’t work with the program you were using will help these techs pinpoint that sweet spot that gives maximum pain relief. It takes a couple of days for the changes to be absorbed by your nervous system and feel its effect. You can after a couple of days increase the frequency or power to see how that feels. I found it interesting that more power is not always more better when it comes to these implants, Too much power can sometimes cause pain. It is important though to try higher settings just to see how it affects you. It really can feel too high I have found out; it was an odd sensation of just being a little buzzed but not in a good way. I was advised to go back to a lower setting. My implant is in the cervical area or neck and have been told that is bit more sensitive than the lower back. Generally they give you two new programs and keep one that stays the same when changing the leads programming.

Jump to this post

This is to wsh66, I understand you had a pain pump implanted, I am thinking along that line. Can you tell me more about it? I am 82 years old and have so many places in my spine. I have had 2 surgeries, a kypoplastic, and 3 compression fractures it the thoracic area and 4 in the lumbar area. I have been told by a neuro-surgon that they can't operate. I don't like to take pain pills because they make me sick to my stomach. I had a stimulator, it didn't work for me. I would love to hear more from someone who has a pain pump. I am waiting to hear from you

REPLY
@cjpeterson

The reprogramming is done by the Nevro tech with a wifi connection from her laptop. She places a small transmitter next to you near your implanted device. The more information you can give her about what worked or didn’t work with the program you were using will help these techs pinpoint that sweet spot that gives maximum pain relief. It takes a couple of days for the changes to be absorbed by your nervous system and feel its effect. You can after a couple of days increase the frequency or power to see how that feels. I found it interesting that more power is not always more better when it comes to these implants, Too much power can sometimes cause pain. It is important though to try higher settings just to see how it affects you. It really can feel too high I have found out; it was an odd sensation of just being a little buzzed but not in a good way. I was advised to go back to a lower setting. My implant is in the cervical area or neck and have been told that is bit more sensitive than the lower back. Generally they give you two new programs and keep one that stays the same when changing the leads programming.

Jump to this post

I got my pain pump at M Health in Minneapolis Minnesota. It was implanted by dr. Michael Park who was a neurosurgeon working there it drips 2.75 mg of Dilaudid through a catheter that runs the length of my spine every 24 hours.. The medication comes by a pump which is surgically implanted on the left side of my belly just above my belt. I also have a remote control which allows me to dispense another 9/10 of 1 mg in 10 doses every 24 hours. if I try to exceed that the pump will tell me I how long I have to wait for the next dose. I returned to the doctor approximately every 3 months to have the old medication removed and new medication added. I lie on my back, he pulls up my shirt, lays a template on my stomach, and inserts a small needle into the pump, draws out what's left of the last dose and then refills the pump with medication for the next 3 months. if you're following this is a total of less than 4 mg per day however medication delivered in this fashion is 300 times more powerful then medication you put in your mouth. I am very satisfied with the pump, I still have pain but it's manageable and they allow me to keep a small amount of oral medication. I'm presently weaning myself off the oral meds. Your back and the description of it sounds like mine and mine is too complicated for surgery also. if you're healthy enough to have the surgery you sound like the perfect candidate for the pump. Watch for another reply because I'm going to proof read this and make sure I didn't leave anything out and I'm going to look up my doctors phone number at M health and give you that as well. Good luck. love and blessings.

REPLY
@cjpeterson

The reprogramming is done by the Nevro tech with a wifi connection from her laptop. She places a small transmitter next to you near your implanted device. The more information you can give her about what worked or didn’t work with the program you were using will help these techs pinpoint that sweet spot that gives maximum pain relief. It takes a couple of days for the changes to be absorbed by your nervous system and feel its effect. You can after a couple of days increase the frequency or power to see how that feels. I found it interesting that more power is not always more better when it comes to these implants, Too much power can sometimes cause pain. It is important though to try higher settings just to see how it affects you. It really can feel too high I have found out; it was an odd sensation of just being a little buzzed but not in a good way. I was advised to go back to a lower setting. My implant is in the cervical area or neck and have been told that is bit more sensitive than the lower back. Generally they give you two new programs and keep one that stays the same when changing the leads programming.

Jump to this post

Dr. Michael Park, 612 624 6666 this is the guy for the pain pump. He works at M Health in Minneapolis Minnesota. I'm a post another phone number for him, actually it's for, Karen, his nurse coordinator. 623-676-5779.

REPLY
@cjpeterson

The reprogramming is done by the Nevro tech with a wifi connection from her laptop. She places a small transmitter next to you near your implanted device. The more information you can give her about what worked or didn’t work with the program you were using will help these techs pinpoint that sweet spot that gives maximum pain relief. It takes a couple of days for the changes to be absorbed by your nervous system and feel its effect. You can after a couple of days increase the frequency or power to see how that feels. I found it interesting that more power is not always more better when it comes to these implants, Too much power can sometimes cause pain. It is important though to try higher settings just to see how it affects you. It really can feel too high I have found out; it was an odd sensation of just being a little buzzed but not in a good way. I was advised to go back to a lower setting. My implant is in the cervical area or neck and have been told that is bit more sensitive than the lower back. Generally they give you two new programs and keep one that stays the same when changing the leads programming.

Jump to this post

Thank you so much for the personal information. I have a pain doctor that would implant the pump. I live in Indiana. Again, Thank You!

REPLY
@grandmar

I have chronic pain from spinal issues. I went through the trial phase of the spinal stimulator. The person who connected the stimulator did a horrible job. The wires were not attached appropriately and kept shocking me. I had to go to the doctor to meet with the stimulator rep everyday for 3 days. They did not do anything. As a result, I did not go for it.
I am currently living in a new state and having a horrible time with my pain. If surgery is not the answer, I would not be surprised if a spinal stimulator will be suggested. I’ll have to think long and hard about it.
Good luck!

Jump to this post

HI,
I have a spinal stimulator for lower body pain and a DRG which is focused on my feet due to neuropathy. These are both St. Jude, now Abbott.

I am currently in the medical cannabis program in MN.

I have been down the Opiod path and honestly it worked the best and most consistent, but w the New Years attack by insurance companies (obviously the most qualified to make quality of life descisions across the board on all patients equally)(joking) I was forced to go to the only other thing available – cannabis. Unfortunately for me I don’t seem to get much relief from it.

Anyway, I was really going to say that the techs originally set your upper and lower boundary’s of the stimulator but then (depending on the model) you can raise and lower the intensity within those parameters. If u want to try something outside those parameters you need to see s tech and have them reset your parameters.

On both my stimulators I have the burst system software. My original was prior to that and was constantly zapping me as I changed positions.
Now I do not feel either one unless I try to turn it too high.

REPLY
@miro

I have had chronic nerve pain, in one very specific area on my right upper chest, for over 11 years now. About 2 years ago I asked one apparently well respected pain doctor in my pain clinic if a spinal neurostimulator was an option for me. She said it was not. While she spent 5 minutes with me, other doctors there had spent a lot of time trying different medications, interventions, etc. with me. The doctors can’t absolutely figure out where the pain come from, but think it’s from my spinal cord at about T3 or 4. The pain clinic ran out of ideas for me so I am no longer a patient there. I am still seeing a neurologist, however, who is always thinking outside the box. Do you have any idea if this falls in his domain? He has found lesions in my spinal cord which look similar to MS lesions, but aren’t. I have rambled on a bit. My basic question is about the use of neurostimulators and if anyone knows what they are best used for.

Thanks and I’m pleased for you and all those who have had positive results.

Jump to this post

I have had excruciating back and neuropathic pain for 40+ years with pain extending into my feet 4 and 5 years ago, hands 1+ years ago face and head eight months ago, and my teeth have been going numb and I've been losing hearing in my right ear for about 16 months. Wondering weather a pain med pump or a stimulator would help more. Can you or anyone tell me the pros and cons of each technology?

REPLY
@miro

I have had chronic nerve pain, in one very specific area on my right upper chest, for over 11 years now. About 2 years ago I asked one apparently well respected pain doctor in my pain clinic if a spinal neurostimulator was an option for me. She said it was not. While she spent 5 minutes with me, other doctors there had spent a lot of time trying different medications, interventions, etc. with me. The doctors can’t absolutely figure out where the pain come from, but think it’s from my spinal cord at about T3 or 4. The pain clinic ran out of ideas for me so I am no longer a patient there. I am still seeing a neurologist, however, who is always thinking outside the box. Do you have any idea if this falls in his domain? He has found lesions in my spinal cord which look similar to MS lesions, but aren’t. I have rambled on a bit. My basic question is about the use of neurostimulators and if anyone knows what they are best used for.

Thanks and I’m pleased for you and all those who have had positive results.

Jump to this post

Search these sights for wsh66, I have a pump and have made extensive posts about them. Get one they are dope.

REPLY
@miro

I have had chronic nerve pain, in one very specific area on my right upper chest, for over 11 years now. About 2 years ago I asked one apparently well respected pain doctor in my pain clinic if a spinal neurostimulator was an option for me. She said it was not. While she spent 5 minutes with me, other doctors there had spent a lot of time trying different medications, interventions, etc. with me. The doctors can’t absolutely figure out where the pain come from, but think it’s from my spinal cord at about T3 or 4. The pain clinic ran out of ideas for me so I am no longer a patient there. I am still seeing a neurologist, however, who is always thinking outside the box. Do you have any idea if this falls in his domain? He has found lesions in my spinal cord which look similar to MS lesions, but aren’t. I have rambled on a bit. My basic question is about the use of neurostimulators and if anyone knows what they are best used for.

Thanks and I’m pleased for you and all those who have had positive results.

Jump to this post

I got my pain pump at M Health in Minneapolis Minnesota. It was implanted by dr. Michael Park who was a neurosurgeon working there it drips 2.75 mg of Dilaudid through a catheter that runs the length of my spine every 24 hours.. The medication comes by a pump which is surgically implanted on the left side of my belly just above my belt. I also have a remote control which allows me to dispense another 9/10 of 1 mg in 10 doses every 24 hours. if I try to exceed that the pump will tell me I how long I have to wait for the next dose. I returned to the doctor approximately every 3 months to have the old medication removed and new medication added. I lie on my back, he pulls up my shirt, lays a template on my stomach, and inserts a small needle into the pump, draws out what's left of the last dose and then refills the pump with medication for the next 3 months. if you're following this is a total of less than 4 mg per day however medication delivered in this fashion is 300 times more powerful then medication you put in your mouth. I am very satisfied with the pump, I still have pain but it's manageable and they allow me to keep a small amount of oral medication. I'm presently weaning myself off the oral meds. Your back and the description of it sounds like mine and mine is too complicated for surgery also. if you're healthy enough to have the surgery you sound like the perfect candidate for the pump. Watch for another reply because I'm going to proof read this and make sure I didn't leave anything out and I'm going to look up my doctors phone number at M health and give you that as well. Good luck. love and blessings.

REPLY
@sam65

Hello. I have experienced neuropathic pain for about 10 years stemming from multiple unsuccessful surgeries on both feet. I have tried Neurontin and Lyrica with mind numbing brain fog and extreme tiredness side effects coupled with poor pain control. Cymbalta gives a very small benefit. TENS units just give an annoying alternative pain distraction for me. I have been successfully treated with Vicodin and Oxycodone over most of this period with realitively small dose increases. However, my doctor seems to be feeling the anti-opioid hysterica and is strongly suggesting that I undergo a trial for a neurostimulator. Could some of you folks give me some details of what a trial entails. (1) For example, can the temporary device be installed in an office setting or must it be done in a surgicenter or as a hospital outpatient? (2) What kind of anastasia is required, just a local, or something more? (3) How long does the test period last? (4) How does one bath with the temporary device in place? (5) Why does it seem many people have positive results with the test, but less benefits with a permanent installation? Thanks for any guidance or advice!

Jump to this post

The pump is far better. No external leads or anything else. Just a remote control. Read the rest of this reply.

I got my pain pump at M Health in Minneapolis Minnesota. It was implanted by dr. Michael Park who was a neurosurgeon working there it drips 2.75 mg of Dilaudid through a catheter that runs the length of my spine every 24 hours.. The medication comes by a pump which is surgically implanted on the left side of my belly just above my belt. I also have a remote control which allows me to dispense another 9/10 of 1 mg in 10 doses every 24 hours. if I try to exceed that the pump will tell me I how long I have to wait for the next dose. I returned to the doctor approximately every 3 months to have the old medication removed and new medication added. I lie on my back, he pulls up my shirt, lays a template on my stomach, and inserts a small needle into the pump, draws out what's left of the last dose and then refills the pump with medication for the next 3 months. if you're following this is a total of less than 4 mg per day however medication delivered in this fashion is 300 times more powerful then medication you put in your mouth. I am very satisfied with the pump, I still have pain but it's manageable and they allow me to keep a small amount of oral medication. I'm presently weaning myself off the oral meds. Your back and the description of it sounds like mine and mine is too complicated for surgery also. if you're healthy enough to have the surgery you sound like the perfect candidate for the pump. Watch for another reply because I'm going to proof read this and make sure I didn't leave anything out and I'm going to look up my doctors phone number at M health and give you that as well. Good luck. love and blessings.

REPLY
@miro

I have had chronic nerve pain, in one very specific area on my right upper chest, for over 11 years now. About 2 years ago I asked one apparently well respected pain doctor in my pain clinic if a spinal neurostimulator was an option for me. She said it was not. While she spent 5 minutes with me, other doctors there had spent a lot of time trying different medications, interventions, etc. with me. The doctors can’t absolutely figure out where the pain come from, but think it’s from my spinal cord at about T3 or 4. The pain clinic ran out of ideas for me so I am no longer a patient there. I am still seeing a neurologist, however, who is always thinking outside the box. Do you have any idea if this falls in his domain? He has found lesions in my spinal cord which look similar to MS lesions, but aren’t. I have rambled on a bit. My basic question is about the use of neurostimulators and if anyone knows what they are best used for.

Thanks and I’m pleased for you and all those who have had positive results.

Jump to this post

Thank you again fro explaining your pain pump to me. I got a message from my pain doctor yesterday, he said we would discuss it on my next appointment in September.

REPLY
Please login or register to post a reply.