Functional doctors

Posted by eileenb1022 @eileenb1022, Aug 3 7:38am

Good morning,
I dont know if this is the right group to post this on. if its not please let me know. for all the various issues mediclly im dealing with, i wont list them but several people mostly on facebook all they said is you should see a functional doctor, and how they are amazing and so much better and thourough than regular doctors. well i probobly should have known better cause such one was advertising on facebook of all places said he was running a special for his consult which was pretty cheap and that he specialized in autoimmune disorders so i called. i was suppose to have a telehealth appointment with him tomorrow(as he is in a different state) yesterday i had to scan and email the questionaires they wanted which took a couple hours as my husband had trouble with it then she said thy would like my latest bloodwork which was in june so i emailed that. the only problem that i was aware of as far as bloodwork goes is a problem with my tsh, my b12, mt iron, iron sat and ferritan levels. well i get this email from him early evening yesterday shorly after i sent them. this dr. omg, he emailed me didnt even address me by name just starts with your choresterol isnt the issue, even thugh i have been on cholestrol meds for 19 yrs then he says my electrolytes are not good. all i drink is gatorade which has electrolytes so cant figure that one out. then he contines with if your results show a low anion gap it may mean i have a low level of albumin, a protein in the blood. which could indicate kidney problems, heart disease or some types of cancer. then types low AST too whatever im suppose to know what that is i didnt see that on my bloodwork. then he ends the email with the word "uuuuggggg". what dr says something like that? i am beyond upset and when i texted this to his assistant that i have all these problems with his email she defends everything, doesnt acknowledge the "uuuggg" then says she is refunding my consult fee. so seems to me this doctor is a scammer which did nothing but add to my fear. thoughts?

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Healthy Living group.

Well, I think we've all been here " well i probobly should have known better cause such one was advertising on facebook of all places said he was running a special for his consult which was pretty cheap and that he specialized in autoimmune disorders so i called." We get anxious to find what we need and ignore that little voice in the back of our mind asking "Really, is this a good idea?"

Rather than give up in despair, maybe look for a practitioner through an organization that certifies and trains professional in functional medicine? I found good information about what functional medicine is here: http://www.ifm.org

And on the same site, I searched for certified practitioners near me:
http://www.ifm.org/find-a-practitioner/
I found two who are known to my family and well-respected by them.

Keep in mind that sometimes lines are "blurry" when looking for someone practicing in a different way. Sometimes people use the terms like "functional practice" "integrative practice" and "holistic practice" interchangeably, but each is a specific approach.

Make sure anyone you are relying on is well trained in anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology…as well as specific alternative practice you are seeking. The best practitioners will usually be those who have added the new approach to their solid educational background after finding the traditional methods ineffective or too limiting. I would avoid anyone who takes a short course in the practice, without a solid background, then goes into business. I would also avoid ANY practitioner who is an absolutist – who shuns all other practices, or advertises the ability to cure an incurable disease or condition. Another red flag is advertising by a medical practitioner – good ones are so busy it is difficult to get an appointment – they don't need to advertise.

Are you willing to share a little about what is leading you to seek a functional medicine practitioner?
Sue

REPLY
@sueinmn

Well, I think we've all been here " well i probobly should have known better cause such one was advertising on facebook of all places said he was running a special for his consult which was pretty cheap and that he specialized in autoimmune disorders so i called." We get anxious to find what we need and ignore that little voice in the back of our mind asking "Really, is this a good idea?"

Rather than give up in despair, maybe look for a practitioner through an organization that certifies and trains professional in functional medicine? I found good information about what functional medicine is here: http://www.ifm.org

And on the same site, I searched for certified practitioners near me:
http://www.ifm.org/find-a-practitioner/
I found two who are known to my family and well-respected by them.

Keep in mind that sometimes lines are "blurry" when looking for someone practicing in a different way. Sometimes people use the terms like "functional practice" "integrative practice" and "holistic practice" interchangeably, but each is a specific approach.

Make sure anyone you are relying on is well trained in anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology…as well as specific alternative practice you are seeking. The best practitioners will usually be those who have added the new approach to their solid educational background after finding the traditional methods ineffective or too limiting. I would avoid anyone who takes a short course in the practice, without a solid background, then goes into business. I would also avoid ANY practitioner who is an absolutist – who shuns all other practices, or advertises the ability to cure an incurable disease or condition. Another red flag is advertising by a medical practitioner – good ones are so busy it is difficult to get an appointment – they don't need to advertise.

Are you willing to share a little about what is leading you to seek a functional medicine practitioner?
Sue

Jump to this post

Struggling with this myself. Currently, is this an option I should even pursue…..it adds another provider into the mix. This can complicate and/or provide valuable perspective.

REPLY
@jlharsh

Struggling with this myself. Currently, is this an option I should even pursue…..it adds another provider into the mix. This can complicate and/or provide valuable perspective.

Jump to this post

Here is another option to consider. Whenever I see a new doc, whether for a new or existing matter, I ask if they are open to alternative treatments – that is, other than the usually used medications and/or surgery. Then I work with them (or not) based on their response.

For example, when I resisted opioid meds for chronic pain, it opened a discussion with my primary about pain management, and led to a pain management doc & therapists, a new mindset, and a new lifestyle where I deal with the pain using a variety of strategies.

My ortho surgeon (for 12 years) says his goal is not "just to operate" but to give each patient their best life. He got me into rigorous land and water PT after 5 hip replacements to get back complete mobility. When it was obvious I would eventually need several hand surgeries for arthritis, he help me manage with PT & injections until it was time to see a hand surgeon. Now he is watching all my replaced parts, and monitoring several other arthritic joints – keeping them going as long as possible with PT, being careful & occasional injections to calm major inflammatory storms.

These are examples of functional medicine approaches by mainstream providers. I believe the current wave of people suffering post Covid issues for which there are no known cures is going to lead to more open approaches to trying alternatives.

As patients, we learn that functional medicine is teamwork. The doctor and patient together must formulate and carry out a sometimes experimental, and often changing plan. The patient becomes more responsible for their own health, including diet and lifestyle changes. And mindset changes!

This is a process that is not always easy, can be time consuming and maybe even expensive. But if the end result is a better life – not perfect, and not pain-free, but improved, isn't it worthwhile?
Sue

REPLY

You may want to follow up with the doctor who ordered the bloodwork and ask them about your results. You also want to check out doctors’ credentials before you follow their recommendations. Are the MD’s, where did they do their training, etc?

REPLY
@sueinmn

Well, I think we've all been here " well i probobly should have known better cause such one was advertising on facebook of all places said he was running a special for his consult which was pretty cheap and that he specialized in autoimmune disorders so i called." We get anxious to find what we need and ignore that little voice in the back of our mind asking "Really, is this a good idea?"

Rather than give up in despair, maybe look for a practitioner through an organization that certifies and trains professional in functional medicine? I found good information about what functional medicine is here: http://www.ifm.org

And on the same site, I searched for certified practitioners near me:
http://www.ifm.org/find-a-practitioner/
I found two who are known to my family and well-respected by them.

Keep in mind that sometimes lines are "blurry" when looking for someone practicing in a different way. Sometimes people use the terms like "functional practice" "integrative practice" and "holistic practice" interchangeably, but each is a specific approach.

Make sure anyone you are relying on is well trained in anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology…as well as specific alternative practice you are seeking. The best practitioners will usually be those who have added the new approach to their solid educational background after finding the traditional methods ineffective or too limiting. I would avoid anyone who takes a short course in the practice, without a solid background, then goes into business. I would also avoid ANY practitioner who is an absolutist – who shuns all other practices, or advertises the ability to cure an incurable disease or condition. Another red flag is advertising by a medical practitioner – good ones are so busy it is difficult to get an appointment – they don't need to advertise.

Are you willing to share a little about what is leading you to seek a functional medicine practitioner?
Sue

Jump to this post

I didnt even was aware of "funtional or nauropath" doctors. just so many people, mainly og facebook unfortuently use to really suggest them or even push them on me. they used to say thats who they went to and how much better than they are than tradition doctors that you go to that take your insurance. they used to say these type of doctors get :to the root" of your problem rathan than traditional doctors just trat the symptoms and bloodwork they order things a traditional doctor wouldnt. i was well aware these doctors didnt take insurance and i always used to say when people were really pushy about it i'd say im sure they may be better but its not in my budget. im kinda on a budget and it just wasnt something that was possible. i will say i did look into it i think more out of curiousity. i found on in the southern part of my state. good reviews even had some awards he won. i called talk yo a really nice person, had a conversation but the first visit would have been 600 dollars. my income i would not survive trying to pay for that kind of doctor. i pay a decent amount just for my insurance i figure i you can afford it great, but if you cant dont be pushed into it and go into debt. but this one he was advertising on face book, yeah i know red flag. but it was the second time i saw it that i called. he was promoting about how he specializes in autoimmmune disorders and since i have several thats why i initially called. also he's consult he advertised a post covid 48 dollar special for the consult regulary it said 349 and the person i was dealing with said your in good hands and suggested i look him up on healthgrades which i did and yeah it was nothing but really good reviews. but like i said in my post his email to me before even meeting me inplying all these things that were of concern leading to all this serious conditions i just saw a new pcp the other day all these thing i had bloodwork on and yeah they were in the normal range so now in my opinion he was trying to make money off me. make money off someone who doesnt even had that kind of money. i psted a couple reviews myself. i did see on similiar to myself. it was a woman who paid his special consult fee but all she got for her consult was him pitching his 7000 dollar program and she felt like it was a scam. so yeah i have no interest in even consulting a doctor like that at all now. i did see after many searches on him it said he was also a chiropractor and a acupunchurist.so thats my experience not a good one and when he ended the email after wanting me to believe i had all these things possibly wrong with me that it turns out wasnt to end it with "uuuggg" shocked that coming from a so called "doctor"

REPLY
@jlharsh

Struggling with this myself. Currently, is this an option I should even pursue…..it adds another provider into the mix. This can complicate and/or provide valuable perspective.

Jump to this post

i would say only if you have that kind of money and he is a good one.not like the one i dealt with. but these doctors even if they are legit you bill will rack up there probobly in the thousands so its up to you i just know for me id never consider it again after my experience and like i said i live on a set budget so no. i pay alot for my insurance to see traditional doctors and thats the best i can do. there are some really good trditional doctors out there. you just gotta do your research and find them.

REPLY
@sueinmn

Here is another option to consider. Whenever I see a new doc, whether for a new or existing matter, I ask if they are open to alternative treatments – that is, other than the usually used medications and/or surgery. Then I work with them (or not) based on their response.

For example, when I resisted opioid meds for chronic pain, it opened a discussion with my primary about pain management, and led to a pain management doc & therapists, a new mindset, and a new lifestyle where I deal with the pain using a variety of strategies.

My ortho surgeon (for 12 years) says his goal is not "just to operate" but to give each patient their best life. He got me into rigorous land and water PT after 5 hip replacements to get back complete mobility. When it was obvious I would eventually need several hand surgeries for arthritis, he help me manage with PT & injections until it was time to see a hand surgeon. Now he is watching all my replaced parts, and monitoring several other arthritic joints – keeping them going as long as possible with PT, being careful & occasional injections to calm major inflammatory storms.

These are examples of functional medicine approaches by mainstream providers. I believe the current wave of people suffering post Covid issues for which there are no known cures is going to lead to more open approaches to trying alternatives.

As patients, we learn that functional medicine is teamwork. The doctor and patient together must formulate and carry out a sometimes experimental, and often changing plan. The patient becomes more responsible for their own health, including diet and lifestyle changes. And mindset changes!

This is a process that is not always easy, can be time consuming and maybe even expensive. But if the end result is a better life – not perfect, and not pain-free, but improved, isn't it worthwhile?
Sue

Jump to this post

that was my mindset. i was willing to even try to make payment arrangements if thid guy claimed he did wonders around autoimmune disorders i believe he would be my miracle doctor. then came his email then sorry nope. and then i googled functional doctors uum basicly function doctors claims are not proven so for myself the answer is no. we would all like to believe in miracles but sadly my opinion these dr's that dont take insurance, they are in it to make money and i just lost all confience and trust.

REPLY
@alive

You may want to follow up with the doctor who ordered the bloodwork and ask them about your results. You also want to check out doctors’ credentials before you follow their recommendations. Are the MD’s, where did they do their training, etc?

Jump to this post

i get all my bloodwork, test results, everything on a portal so i see it very shortly. i always check out doctors on healthgrades, it lists their education, reviews so on…

REPLY
@eileenb1022

that was my mindset. i was willing to even try to make payment arrangements if thid guy claimed he did wonders around autoimmune disorders i believe he would be my miracle doctor. then came his email then sorry nope. and then i googled functional doctors uum basicly function doctors claims are not proven so for myself the answer is no. we would all like to believe in miracles but sadly my opinion these dr's that dont take insurance, they are in it to make money and i just lost all confience and trust.

Jump to this post

Not all functional medicine doctors are outside the insurance system. Some large clinical practices have functional medicine practitioners (typically Nurse Practitioners with more training) available by referral.

This may have been lost in my long post above, so I will repeat:
Rather than give up in despair, maybe look for a practitioner through an organization that certifies and trains professional in functional medicine? I found good information about what functional medicine is here: http://www.ifm.org

And on the same site, I searched for certified practitioners near me:
http://www.ifm.org/find-a-practitioner/
Then, if you identify a doctor or nurse practitioner near you, check out the doc.

And I will repeat what we often tell people here: Never seek medical care from an Ad (on Google you can identify these by the tiny word "Ad" in the top line) – look for professional organizations, certifying agencies, etc. for advice. Exercise your right to be a smart consumer.
Sue

Sue

REPLY
@sueinmn

Not all functional medicine doctors are outside the insurance system. Some large clinical practices have functional medicine practitioners (typically Nurse Practitioners with more training) available by referral.

This may have been lost in my long post above, so I will repeat:
Rather than give up in despair, maybe look for a practitioner through an organization that certifies and trains professional in functional medicine? I found good information about what functional medicine is here: http://www.ifm.org

And on the same site, I searched for certified practitioners near me:
http://www.ifm.org/find-a-practitioner/
Then, if you identify a doctor or nurse practitioner near you, check out the doc.

And I will repeat what we often tell people here: Never seek medical care from an Ad (on Google you can identify these by the tiny word "Ad" in the top line) – look for professional organizations, certifying agencies, etc. for advice. Exercise your right to be a smart consumer.
Sue

Sue

Jump to this post

well first i never saw a function doctor that didnt not take insurance, i prefer not to go to a nurse practioner, case it point my gyn office first visit she misdiagnosed me with something that was life long i wont go into it but basicly i was so upset i was reseen by a actual gyn doctor the nurse practioner was wrong. so she put me through stress and fear for not reason. i have no desire to see a functional dr again yes its my bad i responded to one that advertised on facebook. yes he wanted to make money, yes he tried to convince me certain bloodwork was bad leading to all these serious things. yes i just had bloodwork and all those things were normal. right now im not going to say any more as what im dealing with medicly i wouldnt wish on anyone.

REPLY
@sueinmn

Not all functional medicine doctors are outside the insurance system. Some large clinical practices have functional medicine practitioners (typically Nurse Practitioners with more training) available by referral.

This may have been lost in my long post above, so I will repeat:
Rather than give up in despair, maybe look for a practitioner through an organization that certifies and trains professional in functional medicine? I found good information about what functional medicine is here: http://www.ifm.org

And on the same site, I searched for certified practitioners near me:
http://www.ifm.org/find-a-practitioner/
Then, if you identify a doctor or nurse practitioner near you, check out the doc.

And I will repeat what we often tell people here: Never seek medical care from an Ad (on Google you can identify these by the tiny word "Ad" in the top line) – look for professional organizations, certifying agencies, etc. for advice. Exercise your right to be a smart consumer.
Sue

Sue

Jump to this post

What is Mayo’s approach to functional medicine?

REPLY
@jlharsh

What is Mayo’s approach to functional medicine?

Jump to this post

I can't answer for Mayo Clinics, but they do have at least one doctor in Jacksonville whose specialty is functional medicine. In addition, the Mayo Pain Rehab Clinic philosophy is to work on regaining function for people with chronic pain through a variety of practices.

Are you a Mayo patient?
Sue

REPLY
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