First change in over three years and no idea why

Posted by Carol, Volunteer Mentor @retiredteacher, Sat, Jul 13 10:56am

Over three years ago I was diagnosed as a controlled diabetic. My A1C was just over the limit and my sugar reading was close to normal. My endocrinologist said I barely had diabetes and it could be controlled with diet and exercise. I ate a rigid diet and had a cheat treat only on a holiday. My numbers stayed within range and all was right in my diabetic world except that I have the disease. I have had no troubles and the endo moved me to two times a year checks. However, in the last two days (7/12/19 and 7/13/19) my morning and after meals numbers have been over 30 plus points out of range. Nothing new has happened. I have had blueberries and strawberries, but they are listed as good choices. I eat 4 ounces of red meat once a week. My carbs are allowable (toast for breakfast and a sandwich some nights) but this is not different. I can't find any reason to cause this change. To me the numbers are dangerous for me. I do not take any meds for diabetes—-endo said not needed as long as I'm in range.
Has anyone experienced this situation—–going from usual to way high above "in range?" Any information will be appreciated. This is new for me.
Carol

@dorisena Sorry about your sister, but people make their own choices. She, apparently, did what she wanted though it was not healthy. That's why we have to research and read and be informed so that we can make select what works and is healthy, if that's what we want to do.
Carol

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We are on the same team, Carol. I really appreciate that because I was not considered a healthy child and as an adult I always wanted to be the healthiest I could manage, raising the garden, working hard, and sleeping well. At middle age, I began to appreciate learning as much as I can, and that helps me feel competent to face challenges. One of the benefits of all this study is that my brain is still working, a little slower, maybe, but helping my decisions which I must make on my own. I don't have a family that tells me what to do. I am grateful for that. Dorisena

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@retiredteacher Carol, you have been under a lot of stress, plus your neuropathy has caused you to not be able to exercise. Both of those can be the cause of your numbers being higher than they had been. Plus, as we age, our bodies do have more of an insulin problem. I am also very controlled and on no medications but even for us the day may come when we need to be on something.

Interestingly, my numbers have been higher recently also. They are not bad, but today my bg was 121 two hours after breakfast. That's higher than usual for me. Also, recently I have been very stressed so now that we are talking about this I wonder if the stress may be causing a problem for me. I am still getting exercise most days.
Jk

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@contentandwell

@retiredteacher Carol, you have been under a lot of stress, plus your neuropathy has caused you to not be able to exercise. Both of those can be the cause of your numbers being higher than they had been. Plus, as we age, our bodies do have more of an insulin problem. I am also very controlled and on no medications but even for us the day may come when we need to be on something.

Interestingly, my numbers have been higher recently also. They are not bad, but today my bg was 121 two hours after breakfast. That's higher than usual for me. Also, recently I have been very stressed so now that we are talking about this I wonder if the stress may be causing a problem for me. I am still getting exercise most days.
Jk

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@contentandwell I have been so strict over the last three days that I thought my numbers would be down this morning. However, they are as high as ever, then go down during the day.I haven't eaten anything different, but other than household chores I have not been able to exercise. There is always stress but now added more because these numbers just came overnight and I have never seen this before. I have the tremors on the inside and my feet are in pain all of the time.
I am basically anti-doctor because there are only a couple of specialists in this area.
I am just confused—researching and reading trying to see what's going on.
I know you are having stress too. Have you changed anything to try to compensate for higher numbers?
Maybe others are having higher numbers too.
Stay in touch.
Carol

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@retiredteacher The only thing I have changed is that I am watching my carbs more carefully. I do not test much, never more than once a day. I may need to start doing that. Hopefully, things will even out before my endo appointment at the end of September. I really do not want to have to take any more pills.
You are under far more stress than I am though. I definitely think that, along with the lack of exercise, are the causes of your problem.
JK

Liked by trishanna

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@contentandwell That may be. I have counted carbs, so I know I am not over the range with those. My endo appointment is in four weeks. I think I'll wait it out and see what happens in that time. This is just frustrating. Everything was going along smoothly and now it's as if I am falling apart!
Carol

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@retiredteacher I know how diligent you are. This must be terribly frustrating. I will be interested in hearing what your endo says.
JK

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@contentandwell I have been so strict and in control since my diagnosis, and now it seems that everything is changing. My husband says we will call tomorrow and see if we can move my appointment up to a week from today instead of three weeks from today. I don't think it will make much difference. I am tired of fighting this disease. It has taken away my lifestyle since I had to change everything and then having to retire is not something I have been able to accept. I have reached the point where I guess I don't care. I am 75 years old. I had a really good life until this, and now I don't want to deal with anything else. I don't want meds or shots or any of that. I don't want tests or invasions at my age. I just don't think it's worth it. My endo will suggest pills or shots and tests. He's just that way, and if I refuse, then he'll dismiss me as a patient. I don't know what's going to come of this, but I don't think it will be pleasant. Time will tell.
Carol

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@retiredteacher

@contentandwell I have been so strict and in control since my diagnosis, and now it seems that everything is changing. My husband says we will call tomorrow and see if we can move my appointment up to a week from today instead of three weeks from today. I don't think it will make much difference. I am tired of fighting this disease. It has taken away my lifestyle since I had to change everything and then having to retire is not something I have been able to accept. I have reached the point where I guess I don't care. I am 75 years old. I had a really good life until this, and now I don't want to deal with anything else. I don't want meds or shots or any of that. I don't want tests or invasions at my age. I just don't think it's worth it. My endo will suggest pills or shots and tests. He's just that way, and if I refuse, then he'll dismiss me as a patient. I don't know what's going to come of this, but I don't think it will be pleasant. Time will tell.
Carol

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This is going to sound really odd, and I'm sure everyone will have a conniption fit at Mayo, but please, folks, hear me out.

Over the years, I've been involved with folks who were ordered to quit smoking by their doctors. With one exception, they suffered greatly. Watching them, I decided I would never push anyone to do something so absolutely painful for their "own good." There's a quality of life factor here that's to me more important than "wellness." Am I advising folks not to quit smoking? Absolutely not! I quit for a couple of years, but as my problems mounted, the desire to return to smoking grew, causing uncomfortable cravings. Remembering my promise, I decided to have one cigarette every day at the same time. Now, no matter what calamity strikes at, say, 11:00 a.m., I know that in 11 hours, I get to have a cigarette. Just one. Unlike others who have been forced to quit, there are no cravings for the rest of the 24-hour period, nor have I had to turn to alcohol or some other bad-for-me substance.

My pcp is gong-no for the Mediterranean Diet for diabetes. I asked if my small piece of cinnamon toast (made with sweetener) was allowed. Absolutely not, he said. Why? Cause it's not on the Mediterranean Diet. I think not. Same holds true for my Stouffer Pot Pie. When problems are overwhelming me and I'm unable to prepare a meal from scratch, I make it for dinner. Oh, and my dietary restrictions include chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and gastrointestinal problems.

If one has one cigarette and coughs up blood, obviously one has a zero tolerance for smoking and shouldn't have even one cigarette. If swallowing a particular substance puts one in ICU, then don't do it. Common sense is at work here, I hope. "One" does not mean "one gallon" of ice cream, nor does it mean two would also be okay.

It seems to me that you, Carol, have put terrible pressure on yourself to be perfect. Perfection is highly overrated, unachievable, and probably won't work. Strict and in control? Maybe, but I kind of doubt it since us humans are flawed that way, don't you know?

Hope your endo has an explanation, but I know you know just how complicated our bodies are. I do understand where you're at in your thinking. After my last colonoscopy, I vowed never to have one again cause the prep made me sooo sick. Dr. Gupta called this week to schedule a colonoscopy, and I said no. I 'm 80, with a whole litany of medical problems, anyone of which can probably be fatal at any time. Meanwhile, the cooks at TGIF worked with me to reduce the carb level of the Cajun Chicken and Shrimp Pasta, which I love. My pcp would be horrified, but every once in a while, I enjoy myself with a dinner out not on the list.

Please be kind to yourself and take care. And please know we will be thinking about you and hope you are able to get some answers. If it's convenient, let us know what the doctor says.

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@retiredteacher

@contentandwell I have been so strict and in control since my diagnosis, and now it seems that everything is changing. My husband says we will call tomorrow and see if we can move my appointment up to a week from today instead of three weeks from today. I don't think it will make much difference. I am tired of fighting this disease. It has taken away my lifestyle since I had to change everything and then having to retire is not something I have been able to accept. I have reached the point where I guess I don't care. I am 75 years old. I had a really good life until this, and now I don't want to deal with anything else. I don't want meds or shots or any of that. I don't want tests or invasions at my age. I just don't think it's worth it. My endo will suggest pills or shots and tests. He's just that way, and if I refuse, then he'll dismiss me as a patient. I don't know what's going to come of this, but I don't think it will be pleasant. Time will tell.
Carol

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@retiredteacher Try to not be so pessimistic. If your doctor knows you well he probably knows how you feel about medications. I am borderline for high BP and cholesterol but my PCP is just watching it at this point. He knows I do not want any more prescriptions so he is trying to not have to prescribe yet another medication for me.
I really can understand not wanting to have to deal with anything else. I am doing pretty well but when I think of all of the minor things I have I realize that maybe I'm not doing as well as I thought! We just have to do what we have to do.
I hope things will go well with your endo. I think if you could get rid of your neuropathy that would make a huge difference. Not only is it preventing you from exercising much, but it causing stress also.
JK

REPLY
@retiredteacher

@contentandwell I have been so strict and in control since my diagnosis, and now it seems that everything is changing. My husband says we will call tomorrow and see if we can move my appointment up to a week from today instead of three weeks from today. I don't think it will make much difference. I am tired of fighting this disease. It has taken away my lifestyle since I had to change everything and then having to retire is not something I have been able to accept. I have reached the point where I guess I don't care. I am 75 years old. I had a really good life until this, and now I don't want to deal with anything else. I don't want meds or shots or any of that. I don't want tests or invasions at my age. I just don't think it's worth it. My endo will suggest pills or shots and tests. He's just that way, and if I refuse, then he'll dismiss me as a patient. I don't know what's going to come of this, but I don't think it will be pleasant. Time will tell.
Carol

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A couple of years ago I said "no" to the surgeon who recommended both shoulders be replaced. He has been nice about it and treated me with my current fractured shoulder. My doctor's office has never told me what to eat for diabetes and leaves me to manage it myself. He knows I study a lot and seek out my own solutions, so he gets paid basically to check my heart. Yep, it's still working! I think it is very important that we share with each other and try to find measures that work for us, even though we are all different. We ought to find a diabetic mental health professional who will share with us for free and get some support for our mental stamina. Dorisena

Liked by trishanna

REPLY
@trishanna

This is going to sound really odd, and I'm sure everyone will have a conniption fit at Mayo, but please, folks, hear me out.

Over the years, I've been involved with folks who were ordered to quit smoking by their doctors. With one exception, they suffered greatly. Watching them, I decided I would never push anyone to do something so absolutely painful for their "own good." There's a quality of life factor here that's to me more important than "wellness." Am I advising folks not to quit smoking? Absolutely not! I quit for a couple of years, but as my problems mounted, the desire to return to smoking grew, causing uncomfortable cravings. Remembering my promise, I decided to have one cigarette every day at the same time. Now, no matter what calamity strikes at, say, 11:00 a.m., I know that in 11 hours, I get to have a cigarette. Just one. Unlike others who have been forced to quit, there are no cravings for the rest of the 24-hour period, nor have I had to turn to alcohol or some other bad-for-me substance.

My pcp is gong-no for the Mediterranean Diet for diabetes. I asked if my small piece of cinnamon toast (made with sweetener) was allowed. Absolutely not, he said. Why? Cause it's not on the Mediterranean Diet. I think not. Same holds true for my Stouffer Pot Pie. When problems are overwhelming me and I'm unable to prepare a meal from scratch, I make it for dinner. Oh, and my dietary restrictions include chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and gastrointestinal problems.

If one has one cigarette and coughs up blood, obviously one has a zero tolerance for smoking and shouldn't have even one cigarette. If swallowing a particular substance puts one in ICU, then don't do it. Common sense is at work here, I hope. "One" does not mean "one gallon" of ice cream, nor does it mean two would also be okay.

It seems to me that you, Carol, have put terrible pressure on yourself to be perfect. Perfection is highly overrated, unachievable, and probably won't work. Strict and in control? Maybe, but I kind of doubt it since us humans are flawed that way, don't you know?

Hope your endo has an explanation, but I know you know just how complicated our bodies are. I do understand where you're at in your thinking. After my last colonoscopy, I vowed never to have one again cause the prep made me sooo sick. Dr. Gupta called this week to schedule a colonoscopy, and I said no. I 'm 80, with a whole litany of medical problems, anyone of which can probably be fatal at any time. Meanwhile, the cooks at TGIF worked with me to reduce the carb level of the Cajun Chicken and Shrimp Pasta, which I love. My pcp would be horrified, but every once in a while, I enjoy myself with a dinner out not on the list.

Please be kind to yourself and take care. And please know we will be thinking about you and hope you are able to get some answers. If it's convenient, let us know what the doctor says.

Jump to this post

The reason why I don't use the Mediterranean diet is because it has too many carbs. It is for non diabetics, in my view. I do like to pile the veggies on a plate, throw in some shrimp and eat the meal all mixed up on the plate. It looks like a kid eating, but I enjoy it.
You can't keep the ingredients in the taco shells anyway, so I just pile it on a plate all together. There also too much bread on the diet.
The Europeans are big on bread so the diet reflects that custom. In Italy they don't pile on the tomato sauce on the pasta like we do, and the pasta looks golden instead of red. Same with the pizza. Not so much tomato sauce. I eat what works for me and count carbs. Has anyone read the book advertised on computer by Dr. Merrill, the oriental medicine doctor who claims she cured her diabetes and has the answers in her book? I can't get through the day on her diet and I can't do her exercises. Too severe. Dorisena

Liked by trishanna

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