Having sugar numbers go from usual to high above "in range"

Posted by Retired Teacher @retiredteacher, Jul 13, 2019

Over three years ago I was diagnosed as a controlled diabetic. My A1C was just over the limit and my sugar reading was close to normal. My endocrinologist said I barely had diabetes and it could be controlled with diet and exercise. I ate a rigid diet and had a cheat treat only on a holiday. My numbers stayed within range and all was right in my diabetic world except that I have the disease. I have had no troubles and the endo moved me to two times a year checks. However, in the last two days (7/12/19 and 7/13/19) my morning and after meals numbers have been over 30 plus points out of range. Nothing new has happened. I have had blueberries and strawberries, but they are listed as good choices. I eat 4 ounces of red meat once a week. My carbs are allowable (toast for breakfast and a sandwich some nights) but this is not different. I can’t find any reason to cause this change. To me the numbers are dangerous for me. I do not take any meds for diabetes—-endo said not needed as long as I’m in range.
Has anyone experienced this situation—–going from usual to way high above “in range?” Any information will be appreciated. This is new for me.
Carol

Carol, I wrote you a long reply and lost it somehow. I will redo it later. Dorisena

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Hi, @retiredteacher – that does sound perplexing that you've had this change, and nothing evident to account for it, with your numbers being over 30-plus points out of range, when previously your A1C was just over the limit, sugar reading close to normal and your type 2 diabetes was controllable with diet and exercise.

I'd like to tag some members who may have some input on whether a sudden change in numbers has also happened to them, like @gemmax @kamama94 @enska @contentandwell @chocolate5lover

What are you thinking of doing next, @retiredteacher?

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When something similar happened to me after I started taking insulin I was getting a respiratory infection but didn't have any symptoms yet. I'm not a doctor but can share what mine told me, that an infection brewing can throw blood sugars awry. He also told me that sometimes the pancreas dstops producing as much insulin and that sometimes the insulin it does produce is ineffective. Can you schedule an appointment with your physician to try to determine what's really going on? Meanwhile, I'm sending you positive thoughts and good wishes.

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@lisalucier

Hi, @retiredteacher – that does sound perplexing that you've had this change, and nothing evident to account for it, with your numbers being over 30-plus points out of range, when previously your A1C was just over the limit, sugar reading close to normal and your type 2 diabetes was controllable with diet and exercise.

I'd like to tag some members who may have some input on whether a sudden change in numbers has also happened to them, like @gemmax @kamama94 @enska @contentandwell @chocolate5lover

What are you thinking of doing next, @retiredteacher?

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@lisalucier Thanks for your help. I have taken my blood five times (every three hours) today to see if the count is going down, and it has dropped over 100 points. I ate our usual meals. I ate no snack and drank only water. The problem is occurring in the morning reading when it is so high that I have the shakes and trembles, possibly from my fear. I have been so in control for the three+ years that I was shocked yesterday morning and again this morning. So in the morning I'll see if this trend continues. I have cut my food to the least with even smaller portions. I have had 4 oz. of beef and 1 oz. of turkey yesterday and today–not more meat, just vegetables. Now, it's a wait and see if I can get back under control.
Maybe some of the members will give me an idea of what could have triggered this episode, and hopefully, it will not continue.
Carol

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@kamama94

When something similar happened to me after I started taking insulin I was getting a respiratory infection but didn't have any symptoms yet. I'm not a doctor but can share what mine told me, that an infection brewing can throw blood sugars awry. He also told me that sometimes the pancreas dstops producing as much insulin and that sometimes the insulin it does produce is ineffective. Can you schedule an appointment with your physician to try to determine what's really going on? Meanwhile, I'm sending you positive thoughts and good wishes.

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Thanks @kamama94. I don't feel sick. I did my Saturday chores and cooked meals and prepped for tomorrow's meals too. So I don't think it's illness. I know that the pancreas does sometimes stop insulin but by the fact that the numbers drop to normal during the day, I think there is still insulin. My endo is semi-retired and has closed his portal for messages and is only in his office one day a week, so getting to him is almost impossible. My PCP knows nothing about diabetes, so no sense in trying to ask her. I'll just try to control it myself and see if it gets back in line.
Thanks for positive thoughts.
Carol

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@retiredteacher

Thanks @kamama94. I don't feel sick. I did my Saturday chores and cooked meals and prepped for tomorrow's meals too. So I don't think it's illness. I know that the pancreas does sometimes stop insulin but by the fact that the numbers drop to normal during the day, I think there is still insulin. My endo is semi-retired and has closed his portal for messages and is only in his office one day a week, so getting to him is almost impossible. My PCP knows nothing about diabetes, so no sense in trying to ask her. I'll just try to control it myself and see if it gets back in line.
Thanks for positive thoughts.
Carol

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@retired teacher, there's another cause for high sugars, especially in the mornings. The Smogyi Syndrome usually occurs with diabetics on meds but not impossible to happen to those not on meds. https://my.clevelandclinic.org/…/11443-blood-sugar-hidden-causes-of-high-blood-sugar..

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@kamama94 Thanks for the link about Smogyi; I'll check that out.
Carol

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Carol, I am thinking about my blood sugar when I first had low blood sugar problems in the 1970's and knew nothing about it. The paperback I read, which I have given away, described the up and down flow of the sugar in the blood in a day, and said that, with stress, the higher the numbers go in two hours after eating, the lower they will go, and then it begins to recover after it reaches a low point. That explains why we need to keep the modulation without big highs and lows if possible. We know what causes the sugar to go up and down. In my case, the lows were making me almost pass out, and the stress in my life was really bad. My doctor diagnosed me but only said to eat often and carry cheese. I laid down the law at home and got some of the stress under control and changed my diet to lots of vegetables and fruit and included the meat I always ate. The highs and lows became almost not felt at all. I did not test my blood but relied on how I felt. But I have since then controlled my blood sugar levels to some degree. With diabetes I had to control it more. Exercise is a huge factor in blood sugar control. We are old and tired. We have slowed down. But we keep at it. Dorisena

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@dorisena

Carol, I am thinking about my blood sugar when I first had low blood sugar problems in the 1970's and knew nothing about it. The paperback I read, which I have given away, described the up and down flow of the sugar in the blood in a day, and said that, with stress, the higher the numbers go in two hours after eating, the lower they will go, and then it begins to recover after it reaches a low point. That explains why we need to keep the modulation without big highs and lows if possible. We know what causes the sugar to go up and down. In my case, the lows were making me almost pass out, and the stress in my life was really bad. My doctor diagnosed me but only said to eat often and carry cheese. I laid down the law at home and got some of the stress under control and changed my diet to lots of vegetables and fruit and included the meat I always ate. The highs and lows became almost not felt at all. I did not test my blood but relied on how I felt. But I have since then controlled my blood sugar levels to some degree. With diabetes I had to control it more. Exercise is a huge factor in blood sugar control. We are old and tired. We have slowed down. But we keep at it. Dorisena

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Carol, I have never been a vegetarian because, living on the farm, we had access to good beef and pork. I knew not to overdo for weight purposes, but I do not know how to be healthy without meat. So what works for me may be different than what works for others. I have read that a low protein diet can cause a person to be quite passive in nature. That is why the Jim Jones community ate veggies they raised. The climate did not match their gardening skills and it is thought the diet was very inadequate. I am sure you know how to eat well on your diet, and your calories are expected to be less as you age. Today I was thrilled about something all day. My blood pressure was quite low as I was very relaxed. Maybe I am getting the hang of it all and my numbers will go down some. I know that they will rise over night if I eat more carbs than I need. I know the Metformin lowers blood sugar if taken right after a meal, but it doesn't stay down all night because it is higher again in the morning. I am never really hungry because I don't go long periods of time without food. Dorisena

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@dorisena Thanks for your reply. I researched all of the basics and beyond when I was first diagnosed over three years ago. My endo filled in some of the blanks I had not been able to find, and as time has passed I have read more info in medical articles and on Connect. I know the erratic numbers are not good; that's why I have been so puzzled these last two days. I do not follow the diabetic eating plan as it does not work for me. My blood does not like meat, and when I eat fruits (rarely), the numbers are always higher. It's just never been so high, even when I was diagnosed it was twenty points lower. I test my blood; I am compulsive and have to know where it is on the scale. I know that stress is a big factor and all of 2019 has been extreme stress. The weather also is a factor. It has been hotter (100+) for days, so rest is difficult. I was exercising daily, but have neuropathy or something affecting my feet so walking is painful. It may be a result of the diabetes; I don't know. I do not think of myself as a severe diabetic. Now, though, with these high numbers, I don't know what's changed. It's going to be having patience and seeing if the numbers still skyrocket or if they settle down to where they were for 3+years.
I appreciate your response.
Carol

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Carol, I have been thinking about what the professor in my physiology class said in the 1980's about the insulin pump or pancreas burning out and refusing to produce any insulin at all. He said the doctors wait until the body's system breaks down and then they can treat us. I am thinking that with type 2 we are working on preventing it from getting any worse and as we age that is not easy to do. I still believe in diet and exercise to try to return to a more normal status quo without making our lives miserable and unhappy. Today I read what type 1 diabetics eat and do to find foods that work well for them. Black olives are fine, I read, and I happen to like them in my cottage cheese. I continue to read that processed food is not helpful so I eat as close to the raw as possible. I like spinach both raw and slightly cooked, so I do both. I continue the search for little things that make a difference. Two glasses of water before meals?
I am willing to try it for a while thanks to having a bathroom close to the kitchen. I gave up processed meats years ago except for an occasional hot dog in the campfire. No lunch meats at all. I gave up prepackaged cooked turkey slices after I read about them. I hate to bake a whole turkey to get a slice.
Inch by inch, we can learn to make our bodies work better, but I don't want to continue this until I am 110. Or 115. I have friends in Heaven I want to see.
It would feel good to feel better, however. The neuropathy can come from things other than diabetes, I read. Hmm….Dorisena

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@dorisena Thanks for staying in touch. My numbers were high again this morning so that's four days it's been abnormal for me. It was not as high as it was yesterday but too high. I've checked all day along and it has dropped from the high this morning to normal this afternoon. So it seems to be zooming up at night and then falling steadily during the day. Because it does go down, I think this means my insulin is working. I know which foods work for me and if I deviate, I can expect a spike, so I rarely eat out of my plan. I wonder since I've been eating the same foods for three+ years if my body needs some change. The problem is I don't know what to add. I eat all leafy greens (have always loved them). I love a lettuce salad too. Meats have not been good for me and neither have fruits. So I just need something different to give my system a push. This is really irritating, like when I was first diagnosed and knew nothing about diabetes and neither did the PCP. I researched and read books and educated myself to know what to do. Now with this problem I need to be my own doctor again and figure out what's causing the numbers to be out of range.
If you have any more ideas, I'd love to read them.
Grateful for you sharing your experience.
Carol

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