Fatigue following thalamic stroke

Posted by trixie1313 @trixie1313, Sep 21 9:00am

I suffered a thalamic stroke this last Memorial day losing the use of my right arm and leg. Function has come back in both extremities except with the two fingers in my hand I need to be cognizant of and push a bit harder when typing, but am thankful that is all the residual besides when I'm very tired my foot drags. The fatigue, however (and sometimes weakness) can be annoying. Does anyone know how long the fatigue goes on? I'm also a breast cancer survivor and have bronchiectasis so maybe the stroke plus those issues are cause of this great fatigue?

@trixie1313, I'm glad to hear that physical function has returned almost completely. Fatigue however can be annoying and really affect quality of life. Fatigue is very common after stroke, with about half of survivors experiencing it. Fatigue can affect anyone, no matter how mild or severe their stroke. It is most likely to start in the first weeks after a stroke but for some people it can start months later.

Did your fatigue start soon after stroke? Do you notice a different between tiredness and fatigue? For example tired because you didn't sleep well or during the times you work hard on exercises for physical rehab vs. fatigue that just feels like you hit the wall, can't form sentences or concentrate and it's not really helped by sleeping.

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@colleenyoung
The fatigue and weakness started about a 2 weeks ago or about 3 months following stroke. Feels like I am being sucked into sleep at times, however, I am taking exemestane for breast cancer so possibly the combination of lack of full sleep at night from that plus the stroke cause me to hit a wall. Concentration and sentence forming are not a problem, in fact, following the stroke my mental capabilities seem better! Since small strokes years ago I have had problems with dizziness if I lay flat and following this stroke it has all gone away, almost as if whatever was on my brain cleared a bit!

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I completely understand how you feel. I suffered a cerebellum ischemic stroke in early February. No stroke like symptoms except extreme dizziness. For the first couple months felt unstable but able to function normally. Fatigue started about a month after the stroke and still have days when I get really tested. Usually at lunch time will take a brief nap or just rest my brain. This really helps! Listen to your body and don’t over exert yourself. I think mental fatigue is worse than physical fatigue! I keep praying for this feeling to go away and I do think it’ll I’m getting there. I’m curious if the fatigue will ever go away completely or is this something you just have to live with and adjust accordingly?

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This sheet may have some ideas. Glad to hear of your progress.
https://www.stroke.org.uk/sites/default/files/fatigue_after_stroke.pdf
“ Give yourself plenty of time. It can take many months before post-stroke fatigue starts to lift. The more you push yourself the worse you are likely to feel. Accepting that it takes time to improve can help you to cope better.”

Also, I think a few months is a good and hopeful goal. The article also notes the variation.

“ There have been a number of research studies on fatigue after stroke. In one study, two years after their stroke 10 per cent of stroke survivors said they were always tired and 30 per cent said they were sometimes tired. In another study, at least 12 months after their stroke, 50 per cent of stroke survivors said tiredness was their main problem. You are most likely to experience fatigue shortly after your stroke.”

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@feelingthankful

This sheet may have some ideas. Glad to hear of your progress.
https://www.stroke.org.uk/sites/default/files/fatigue_after_stroke.pdf
“ Give yourself plenty of time. It can take many months before post-stroke fatigue starts to lift. The more you push yourself the worse you are likely to feel. Accepting that it takes time to improve can help you to cope better.”

Also, I think a few months is a good and hopeful goal. The article also notes the variation.

“ There have been a number of research studies on fatigue after stroke. In one study, two years after their stroke 10 per cent of stroke survivors said they were always tired and 30 per cent said they were sometimes tired. In another study, at least 12 months after their stroke, 50 per cent of stroke survivors said tiredness was their main problem. You are most likely to experience fatigue shortly after your stroke.”

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Thank you for the information. I have noticed the more I work the worse the fatigue feels…especially later in the week. I also think working on a computer causes more mental fatigue than physical. Rest is critical. The newsletter was reassuring and will continue to rest and pray for continued healing. Thank You

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