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joanem
@joanem

Posts: 1
Joined: Oct 25, 2016

Fasting blood sugar

Posted by @joanem, Thu, Jan 25 1:45pm

Last summer following hot weather and/or salty foods I noticed mild swelling in my hands and elevated fasting levels; is there any connection?

REPLY

Hello @joanem

That is an interesting question. Salty foods and hot weather can certainly contribute to swelling in the extremities as most of us know.
Are you currently controlling your blood sugar with insulin or oral meds? The elevated fasting levels might be a good question to ask your doctor. Can you call the doctor’s office and check with the doctor or his/her nurse?

Have you ever noticed this combination of symptoms before? These are some good questions to consider as you think about this.

Will you keep in touch with us and let us know how you are doing?

Teresa

Hi, @joanem — welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect.

Here are some Mayo Clinic resources that may be helpful:
– related to heat and blood glucose control: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/expert-blog/heat-and-diabetes/bgp-20056563
– related to fluctuations in glucose levels: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/expert-blog/blood-sugar-fluctuation/bgp-20124504
– on diabetes diet (see last paragraph, especially):https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/in-depth/diabetes-diet/art-20044295

A few members you may wish to meet on Connect who know about blood sugar control are: @gman007, @vdouglas, @retiredteacher and @sandytoes14. Perhaps they will have some insight on your question.

How are you finding your glucose control going now that it’s winter?

Hello @joanem. I wish I had a definitive answer for our diabetes problems, but even doctors can’t answer all that we need to know. As far as elevated fasting numbers, I am still in that group. My endocrinologist doesn’t have a solution, and I have had elevated numbers since I was diagnosed almost two years ago. Because my after lunch numbers drop into the accepted range, he doesn’t seem to be concerned. I think he just attributes the sluggish overnight to my age. Until he worries, I just accept it as the way my body works, or doesn’t, as the case is.

As far as the swelling in your hands in the summer weather, I think that is common for most people. I avoid all heavy, “comfort” foods. I drink water more in the summer than in winter too. I also avoid all picnics, cook-outs, and foods that are the mainstay for summer. I never use salt on any food I prepare. I stay with roasted chicken and green veggies and in season produce that is allowable. In the winter, it can be difficult because we may want heavier foods that we don’t want in summer. I just don’t eat them regularly. I occasionally eat a bowl of chili or some spaghetti. But, I prepare everything myself so that I know what’s in it. I have mild arthritis in my hands so I always have swelling; I try to be extra vigilant.

I know that most diabetics fight with the numbers and the effects that result from them. It is part of the disease. It’s just getting used to the life changes we have to make to stay as well as possible. Ask you doctor and see what the answer is. Do you take medication? I am fortunate that I do not take medication. I have been able to control myself with diet. I eat basically the same things every week. I plan meals and there is not much variety or varying from what I plan.

Good luck. I hope someone can help you more than I can. If you get an answer, let us know.

retiredteacher.

Hello @retiredteacher

Thanks for offering words of wisdom for @joanem. Words based on life experience are always the most encouraging and helpful.

How is your husband doing?

Take care and thank you again for your contribution to this discussion.

Teresa

@hopeful33250

Hello @retiredteacher

Thanks for offering words of wisdom for @joanem. Words based on life experience are always the most encouraging and helpful.

How is your husband doing?

Take care and thank you again for your contribution to this discussion.

Teresa

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@hopeful33250. I don’t think I have many words of wisdom, but I appreciate you saying that. I have a short time of life experience with diabetes and still consider myself a “newbie.” I just try to stay on top of things with research and reading and participating in this forum. There are so many people here who have been living with this disease since they were young, and they have the experience and knowledge. I just take one day at a time and see what happens.

Thanks for asking about my husband. so far this new year 2018 is the year of the eye. He is an avid reader, and after the problems with trying to control his blood pressure, he started feeling pressure in his left eye. We went for our yearly eye check. and the dr. found he has pressure from an artery crimped behind his eye. This in simple terms is an eye stroke. The medical name is long and scary. We will go Monday for him to have a needle put into his eye to drawn the blood out and them there will be injections for the swelling and pressure. Hopefully, this will relieve some of his discomfort. The dr. has told us that it will not correct the damage that has been done, but it will relieve the pressure. We have watched the procedure on UTube, so he is prepared for what the dr. will do. I will be glad when this episode is over and his eye can feel normal again. Then he will have glasses with stronger prescriptions, and hopefully, see clearer again.

@hopeful33250

Hello @retiredteacher

Thanks for offering words of wisdom for @joanem. Words based on life experience are always the most encouraging and helpful.

How is your husband doing?

Take care and thank you again for your contribution to this discussion.

Teresa

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@retiredteacher I wish your husband a successful surgery and rapid recovery. Being able to see clearer again will be wonderful for him, I am sure, particularly since he is a reader.
JK

I have just the opposite issue in the summer. Because I am a sweating machine, I have a very difficult time keeping enough carbs in me to keep my blood sugar from plummeting. I am in the process of getting a continuous monitor the will help me on the golf course to eat and drink enough and also sound the alarm if I have any lows. I recently had a very scary 27 that being at home alone could have been disastrous. I am looking forward to have something tell me before I get in a danger zone. Did I understand you to say that you are not on any medications for your diabetes? I may be confused with someone else, but it sounds like a long acting insulin may help with stabilizing, but that is just what it did for me and I have days I only take 4-8 units of short acting because of activity. Don’t know if that helps at all, but will try to answer any questions that relate to my experience.

@gman007

I have just the opposite issue in the summer. Because I am a sweating machine, I have a very difficult time keeping enough carbs in me to keep my blood sugar from plummeting. I am in the process of getting a continuous monitor the will help me on the golf course to eat and drink enough and also sound the alarm if I have any lows. I recently had a very scary 27 that being at home alone could have been disastrous. I am looking forward to have something tell me before I get in a danger zone. Did I understand you to say that you are not on any medications for your diabetes? I may be confused with someone else, but it sounds like a long acting insulin may help with stabilizing, but that is just what it did for me and I have days I only take 4-8 units of short acting because of activity. Don’t know if that helps at all, but will try to answer any questions that relate to my experience.

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You are right. I do not take any medication for my diabetes. When I was diagnosed, my numbers were just a few above normal. My A1c was 6.0—right on the line for diabetes. I had all the blood profiles and except for being overweight, my numbers are all in range. My endo was quick to say I could take metformin, and I was quick to say I would control my numbers with diet. So in the 22 months I have been a diabetic, I have managed my numbers. Unless there is a really valid reason to take a medicine, I am not going to take it. I have been fortunate. My blood stays within range; sometimes it is higher, and then it levels off. I have no other symptoms.

Maybe the high/low issue is a gender problem. I’ll research that and see if I can find any information. I know for the diet, women are always given fewer calories than men. Perhaps carbs differ as a result of gender, age, physical activity, diet, and all the other areas of difference for everyone. I have found out and finally accepted the fact that we are all unique, and we have to deal with this disease with what works for us individually. It is frustrating, but I do what works for me.

Maybe people who have to take insulin can chat with you. If I ever reach that point, I will check with you then. Until that time, I am going to try to avoid medicine like the plague.

retiredteacher

@hopeful33250

Hello @retiredteacher

Thanks for offering words of wisdom for @joanem. Words based on life experience are always the most encouraging and helpful.

How is your husband doing?

Take care and thank you again for your contribution to this discussion.

Teresa

Jump to this post

Hi @retiredteacher I’m so glad that you shared about your husband’s eye condition. Fellow Connect member and mentor, Scott, is living with the same condition, learning that he had a stroke in his right eye. I’m sure he would appreciate hearing more about your husband’s experience and would be willing to share his journey with you both.

Read more about and reply to Scott on this discussion in the Eye group:
– Central retinal artery occlusion https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/central-retinal-artery-occlusion/

@gman007

I have just the opposite issue in the summer. Because I am a sweating machine, I have a very difficult time keeping enough carbs in me to keep my blood sugar from plummeting. I am in the process of getting a continuous monitor the will help me on the golf course to eat and drink enough and also sound the alarm if I have any lows. I recently had a very scary 27 that being at home alone could have been disastrous. I am looking forward to have something tell me before I get in a danger zone. Did I understand you to say that you are not on any medications for your diabetes? I may be confused with someone else, but it sounds like a long acting insulin may help with stabilizing, but that is just what it did for me and I have days I only take 4-8 units of short acting because of activity. Don’t know if that helps at all, but will try to answer any questions that relate to my experience.

Jump to this post

Managing your numbers with your diet is admirable. I was able to do so until things went south with my pancreas and now I don’t have enough beta cells to produce insulin. As long as you can avoid the drugs, that would be ideal. Very difficult to control weight once the insulin becomes required.

@gman007

I have just the opposite issue in the summer. Because I am a sweating machine, I have a very difficult time keeping enough carbs in me to keep my blood sugar from plummeting. I am in the process of getting a continuous monitor the will help me on the golf course to eat and drink enough and also sound the alarm if I have any lows. I recently had a very scary 27 that being at home alone could have been disastrous. I am looking forward to have something tell me before I get in a danger zone. Did I understand you to say that you are not on any medications for your diabetes? I may be confused with someone else, but it sounds like a long acting insulin may help with stabilizing, but that is just what it did for me and I have days I only take 4-8 units of short acting because of activity. Don’t know if that helps at all, but will try to answer any questions that relate to my experience.

Jump to this post

That’s why I take one day at a time. I know that there are many bad side effects from diabetes. I try to be aware of my body and really know myself. I should be familiar since I will be 74 years old in February. 

I am going to stay away from meds as long as is possible.

retiredteacher

My wife is an elementary school guidance counselor who is about 12 mos shy of her doctorate. What you retired from is one of the highest callings for a profession anyone can have. With the pancreas issues and other complimentary issues that accompany that, I will be stealing every day I get past 74, but I will be a happy thief if that is what happens. I believe I will be in a much better place with no pain whenever that day comes, so I don’t view it with dread or longing; I too am learning to live in the moment (a long road for me) and still have much progress to make. Thank you for looking after our children for a bunch of years. What age and subject(s) did you spend your days with?

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@gman007

My wife is an elementary school guidance counselor who is about 12 mos shy of her doctorate. What you retired from is one of the highest callings for a profession anyone can have. With the pancreas issues and other complimentary issues that accompany that, I will be stealing every day I get past 74, but I will be a happy thief if that is what happens. I believe I will be in a much better place with no pain whenever that day comes, so I don’t view it with dread or longing; I too am learning to live in the moment (a long road for me) and still have much progress to make. Thank you for looking after our children for a bunch of years. What age and subject(s) did you spend your days with?

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Thank you for your kind words, but teaching was my life and when I had to retire, I lost part of my soul. I still mourn every day that I could not continue, as I had planned to die teaching. The Good Lord had other plans. I have hours beyond my Master’s degree to a doctorate, but that, too, could not be completed. I still have a valid teaching certificate, and if there were a miracle, I would walk back into the classroom Monday. I was fortunate to teach in a time when teaching meant an educated person providing knowledge to students. Today, it’s mostly fun and games. That makes me very sad.

I attended an excellent private university and received my AB degree in English with minors in sociology and education. There were no diplomas for general education, where a teacher could teach any subject; those exist today and have watered down the strict requirements for learning. My Master’s degree is also in English with an emphasis on composition and British Lit. The hours beyond my Master’s are also in English with composition and British Lit. My students were seniors in high school and freshmen in college. I taught Advanced Placement English Lit. and Comp. and Advanced Placement English Language and Comp. for my high school students and taught composition for college students. I taught in an exclusive private school. I loved teaching and I miss it every day.

retiredteacher

@gman007

My wife is an elementary school guidance counselor who is about 12 mos shy of her doctorate. What you retired from is one of the highest callings for a profession anyone can have. With the pancreas issues and other complimentary issues that accompany that, I will be stealing every day I get past 74, but I will be a happy thief if that is what happens. I believe I will be in a much better place with no pain whenever that day comes, so I don’t view it with dread or longing; I too am learning to live in the moment (a long road for me) and still have much progress to make. Thank you for looking after our children for a bunch of years. What age and subject(s) did you spend your days with?

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My daughter-in-law was a HS English teacher, but has become her school’s technology expert and she enjoys that as well. I have an MBA and I just loved the learning. I think at age 60, I can audit any class at a state supported institution and if I am able, I plan to become an annoyance to some professor. Were you forced from the classroom because of age maximums or for some other reason? Do you live in an area where there are charter schools of value where your obvious talent and desire would be appreciated?

Liked by Parus

@gman007

My wife is an elementary school guidance counselor who is about 12 mos shy of her doctorate. What you retired from is one of the highest callings for a profession anyone can have. With the pancreas issues and other complimentary issues that accompany that, I will be stealing every day I get past 74, but I will be a happy thief if that is what happens. I believe I will be in a much better place with no pain whenever that day comes, so I don’t view it with dread or longing; I too am learning to live in the moment (a long road for me) and still have much progress to make. Thank you for looking after our children for a bunch of years. What age and subject(s) did you spend your days with?

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I was not forced (?) from the classroom; I believe age discrimination is against the law everywhere. I had some personal family matters that caused me to have to make a choice. I am not interested in returning; it would only make things worse.

retiredteacher

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