Exercise during chemo

Posted by georger @georger, Feb 1, 2019

More and more research shows that exercise is vital in cancer treatment….make it a regular routine…I have a background in exercise physiology and cancer and would be happy to help anyone

@janlanderz

@becsbuddy I currently waiting to hear from the cancer centre with a request to change oncologists.. the second one they gave me is definitely a wrong fit for me… worst than my first oncologist… I asked for a new oncologist if that is not possible I would like to go back to my first oncologist… I left my last appointment which was only my second appointment with the new oncologist with much anxiety with how the appointment went… nothing to do with results.. had to do with her demeanor and how she responded to my questions and stuff like that.. kind of too much to explain… the cancer centre was suppose to get back to me by last Friday or This past monday…and neither has happened… I have to go for my 12th chemo this coming Tuesday and will inquire as to what is going on… I feel this cancer centre is not very passionate to the cancer patients that I have seen go through there or have talked to… pretty sad… but I will continue to advocate for myself until I get the care that I deserve…
Our health care system is failing us…

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@janlanderz I’m sorry your second oncologist didn’t meet your needs.😥. But, keep advocating for yourself!

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@janlanderz

@becsbuddy and @georger.. First I want to thank the two of you for reaching out to help me… as I am basically on this cancer journey alone and it helps to know there are people willing to help even if I don't know you… I feel close to you for being there for me. I will begin to take a yoga class on Tuesday mornings at the Hospice Centre in my community. On Wednesday mornings I take Tai Chi at the Hospice centre and will begin to take a physical fitness class on Thursdays at the Hospice Centre as well.. all the classes are an hour in length.. So this is what I have come up with so far…
I do the 8 pieces of brocade of Tai Chi at home sometimes as well… not at often as I should.. but it's just a matter of getting myself motivated. As with most of us… depression sometimes sets in and those days I push myself to do things… I am getting better at getting out even if it is to go to the park and read.. getting out of the house makes me think less of the disease… I do the best to self talk myself into accepting the fact that it is what it is… I was always one to help others … but now my role at work doing that is no longer there and I feel lost at times… being off of work is probably the worst thing that could of happened to me.. now I do nothing but think all the time and it takes me down at times… I just put my big girl pants on and seek education and support from others… Thank you both again soooooooo much…

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How’s it all going ? Hope things are going well…let me know

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@2onlow8

After 2 Keytruda infusions added to my Alimta my CEA count has increased again, but seems to have slowed slightly, possible because I stopped CBD 2 weeks ago? New question: Keytruda and Prolia interaction? Anyone run across this issue? I’m due for my semi annual Prolia shot but see there may be interactions with Keytruda and steroids required by Keytruda. Oncologist referred me to Prolia prescribing GP and he’s referred me back to Oncologist!

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@2onlow8
I’m wondering how you are doing! Did the doctors go ahead with keytruda and prolia? I’ve not seen or heard of interaction between the 2 drugs. Guess doctors know all this really well. Hope you’re doing ok

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@georger

Haven't heard from anyone lately re exercise during and after treatment…..would love to share my expand assist anyone with theirs…..anyone!!😎

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Exercise has been my biggest difficulty while being treated for NSLC with Alectinib. While we are seeing good results on CT & MRI. I am experiencing myalgia, fatigue and shortness of breath. Muscle fatigue as well. Walking is difficult but most enjoyable. I’m having difficulty in the gym finding motivation. The pool is my goal and found I can swim and breath well enough to do a length of the pool. Cycling is doable in short 30 min on my bike on its trainer. Weight gain has been a problem maybe as a side effect of meds but probably mostly due to lack of activity compared to the level of exercise I use to do.

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@nicee. I encourage you to do whatever you can when you feel up to it. It doesn’t matter how intense you workout. It matters that you keep moving. It’s so good for your body and brain to stay active. If walking is good, walk. When I was undergoing treatment, I just stayed out of the gym. When I first went into remission, I hired a trainer that could push me at an appropriate pace. A trainer will help your motivation in the gym. Three years in remission and I will never be what I used to be physically, but the progress I’ve made since Cancer is phenomenal. Now, put on your tennis shoes and get walking. Good luck

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@mepowers

@nicee. I encourage you to do whatever you can when you feel up to it. It doesn’t matter how intense you workout. It matters that you keep moving. It’s so good for your body and brain to stay active. If walking is good, walk. When I was undergoing treatment, I just stayed out of the gym. When I first went into remission, I hired a trainer that could push me at an appropriate pace. A trainer will help your motivation in the gym. Three years in remission and I will never be what I used to be physically, but the progress I’ve made since Cancer is phenomenal. Now, put on your tennis shoes and get walking. Good luck

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Absolutely wonderful advice @mepowers. Exercise and physical activities were a huge part of my recovery from the effects of cancer as well. Start slow, be consistent. Once the body gets used to moving it will love you for it. I found that when motivation was a factor, I would take a friend along.

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@grandpabob

Absolutely wonderful advice @mepowers. Exercise and physical activities were a huge part of my recovery from the effects of cancer as well. Start slow, be consistent. Once the body gets used to moving it will love you for it. I found that when motivation was a factor, I would take a friend along.

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Working with a trainer is ideal….I wish I was closer..would be happy to help

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@georger

Working with a trainer is ideal….I wish I was closer..would be happy to help

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@georger, what should people look for in a trainer? How do you tell the good ones from the less qualified? Anything special cancer survivors should keep in mind?

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@colleenyoung

@georger, what should people look for in a trainer? How do you tell the good ones from the less qualified? Anything special cancer survivors should keep in mind?

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I know you asked @georger, but I’ve worked with different trainers before and after cancer. I think the most important thing is finding a trainer you click with. Normally trainers list their qualifications, so find someone who has a certification. There are many certifications, I would look for someone that specializes in things you like to do. Watch them when they train others. Do you like what they are doing? Do they train a similar demographic as you? Let them know your goals. I started out needing to work on balance and stamina. Strength came later as did my confidence.

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@colleenyoung

@georger, what should people look for in a trainer? How do you tell the good ones from the less qualified? Anything special cancer survivors should keep in mind?

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I would look for someone with the education and experience with training and ideally someone with cancer experience. Thats what I have and I would be happy to work with you but ideally it would be someone living in your area but I will be glad to help long distance.

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@nicee

Exercise has been my biggest difficulty while being treated for NSLC with Alectinib. While we are seeing good results on CT & MRI. I am experiencing myalgia, fatigue and shortness of breath. Muscle fatigue as well. Walking is difficult but most enjoyable. I’m having difficulty in the gym finding motivation. The pool is my goal and found I can swim and breath well enough to do a length of the pool. Cycling is doable in short 30 min on my bike on its trainer. Weight gain has been a problem maybe as a side effect of meds but probably mostly due to lack of activity compared to the level of exercise I use to do.

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My husband, Popkorhn, was diagnosed with 4th stage small cell lung cancer in December and started Chemo and immunotherapy in early January. He exercises by playing pickleball, 4 days a week and golfs a 5th day. At 74 years old, he gets his 8,000-11,000 steps in ,most days ,excepts on Saturday and Sundays. We have noticed that the days he has felt somewhat fatigued, are the days following his sitting, rather than moving. We will continue to watch. So far he has had no side effects from his treatments and beats the us all at pickleball. We believe his exercise has been a key factor. Praying it continues.

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@nicee

Exercise has been my biggest difficulty while being treated for NSLC with Alectinib. While we are seeing good results on CT & MRI. I am experiencing myalgia, fatigue and shortness of breath. Muscle fatigue as well. Walking is difficult but most enjoyable. I’m having difficulty in the gym finding motivation. The pool is my goal and found I can swim and breath well enough to do a length of the pool. Cycling is doable in short 30 min on my bike on its trainer. Weight gain has been a problem maybe as a side effect of meds but probably mostly due to lack of activity compared to the level of exercise I use to do.

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@nicee– Good morning and welcome to Mayo Connect. Exercise can be very difficult during cancer treatments. During my chemo, I was so tired that I felt as if I couldn't lift a pen a lot of the time. So I didn't exercise. And no one 12+ years ago recommended that I should.
There are many youtube videos for cancer patients who need to take it easy exercising.

Even some basic stretching exercises can help eliminate some of your muscle cramps, along with plenty of water! Is it possible to get a script for PT so that a Physical Therapist can help with this?

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@merpreb

@nicee– Good morning and welcome to Mayo Connect. Exercise can be very difficult during cancer treatments. During my chemo, I was so tired that I felt as if I couldn't lift a pen a lot of the time. So I didn't exercise. And no one 12+ years ago recommended that I should.
There are many youtube videos for cancer patients who need to take it easy exercising.

Even some basic stretching exercises can help eliminate some of your muscle cramps, along with plenty of water! Is it possible to get a script for PT so that a Physical Therapist can help with this?

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We were told to do what you feel comfortable doing. Since my husband normally played 90 minutes of Pickleball a day and golfed one day, he has continued it. So far there has been no decline in how he has felt, yet he has only had two series of Chemo treatments with immunotherapy , for 3 days a week , every 3 weeks. He goes again January 26th. While his blood counts are changing, it is likely his energy level will too. He uses spay B-12, and is eating well , along with the exercise, seem to keep him feeling fine so far. We are grateful, yet know things are likely to change.

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@popkorhn

We were told to do what you feel comfortable doing. Since my husband normally played 90 minutes of Pickleball a day and golfed one day, he has continued it. So far there has been no decline in how he has felt, yet he has only had two series of Chemo treatments with immunotherapy , for 3 days a week , every 3 weeks. He goes again January 26th. While his blood counts are changing, it is likely his energy level will too. He uses spay B-12, and is eating well , along with the exercise, seem to keep him feeling fine so far. We are grateful, yet know things are likely to change.

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@popkorhn– That's exactly right, do what you are comfortable doing–but do something if you can! I learned that you have to move! I am so glad, that for now, Popkorhn is doing so well. How are you holding up? It must be a very tough road for you.

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@ginpene05

Oddly enough, I was able to exercise throughout my R-CHOP for Non hodgkins lymphoma in 2017 but now am having more trouble staying active. Recently, however, I have decided that my Bipolar, in a deperessive episode, has contributed to my stuborness regarding exercise. So my Psych Doc changed my meds, and I am back in the gym! I hope this lasts long enough for me to get back in the habit. Thanks, gp

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Hi genpene, thank you for your reply. I have stage IIIa Multiple Myeloma. I too, have depression, and anxiety. I also have bone lesions throughout my skeleton, and am also taking steroids as part of my treatment regime. Dexamethasone also weakens bones. I have been stubborn about walking, and also afraid of compression fractures, and pathalogical fractures. Walking is the only safe exercise for me, at this point. Fear of falling is preventing me from being consistent. Any advice on boosting
my motivation would be appreciated!

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