Elderly father with Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD)?

Posted by maryland677 @maryland677, Sun, Jun 23 9:08pm

Looking to learn more about OCPD. My 87-year old father has recently started treatment for psychotic/paranoid delusions, but the underlying issue may be OCPD. He has exhibited at least 5 of the 8 DCM-V listed characteristics for OCPD for as long as I can remember. The delusions seem more like his latest thing to obsess about, as opposed to someone who is psychotic in a much more general sense. I am finding it challenging to locate much info on OCPD except highly technical articles. Any help appreciated!

my now ex-husband was diagnosed with that. I feel your pain and frustration with the condition. You are correct, Dr. Google doesn't provide alot of information or explain the headache and heartache that ocpd can bring to your life.

some of his behaviors included

hoarding
preoccupation with certain activities
mowing the lawn repetitively to get the lines straight (7 hours sometimes)
porn
cleaning
washing his hands until the skin was raw
fear of germs
wearing rubber gloves, wiping everything off with packages of wipes
angry screaming temper tantrum outbursts if I didn't comply to his psycho way of doing things

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@maryland677 – I wanted to join @user_chdb5e8ac in welcoming you to Mayo Clinic Connect. Sounds as though you are looking out for your father, and I applaud your efforts to learn more about Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD), which you believe he may have. If you scroll down a bit on this Mayo Clinic page, you will find information on OCPD https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/personality-disorders/symptoms-causes/syc-20354463.

I'd like to invite into this conversation @gingerw @iwishiwasanon @parus @healthytoday @gman007 @wellandhappy, who may have some thoughts for you as you try and help your dad with his delusions and other symptoms from OCPD. What are some of the other characteristics of the 8 DCM-V listed characteristics for OCPD that you've seen in your dad?

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@lisalucier

@maryland677 – I wanted to join @user_chdb5e8ac in welcoming you to Mayo Clinic Connect. Sounds as though you are looking out for your father, and I applaud your efforts to learn more about Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD), which you believe he may have. If you scroll down a bit on this Mayo Clinic page, you will find information on OCPD https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/personality-disorders/symptoms-causes/syc-20354463.

I'd like to invite into this conversation @gingerw @iwishiwasanon @parus @healthytoday @gman007 @wellandhappy, who may have some thoughts for you as you try and help your dad with his delusions and other symptoms from OCPD. What are some of the other characteristics of the 8 DCM-V listed characteristics for OCPD that you've seen in your dad?

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Yes, welcome to Connect. When I attempt to explain the OCPD situation, I find myself gravitating toward high functioning aspergers, and the autism spectrum.

My youngest daughter developed the ocpd as a late teen, but she did graduate in Geology from a big 10 University and has landed a nice government job with the Department of Natural Resources . She has difficulty with relationships sometimes.

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@lisalucier

@maryland677 – I wanted to join @user_chdb5e8ac in welcoming you to Mayo Clinic Connect. Sounds as though you are looking out for your father, and I applaud your efforts to learn more about Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD), which you believe he may have. If you scroll down a bit on this Mayo Clinic page, you will find information on OCPD https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/personality-disorders/symptoms-causes/syc-20354463.

I'd like to invite into this conversation @gingerw @iwishiwasanon @parus @healthytoday @gman007 @wellandhappy, who may have some thoughts for you as you try and help your dad with his delusions and other symptoms from OCPD. What are some of the other characteristics of the 8 DCM-V listed characteristics for OCPD that you've seen in your dad?

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@maryland677 Has your father had a complete physical by a gerontologist? As a specialist working with our older generation, knowing a baseline is very helpful in moving forward with issues such as you're seeing. Please let us know what steps you decide to take, and know we are here to help however we can.
Ginger

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i think that obessive thoughts can lead to delusons, especially when people with ocpd get obessed with details about things but miss the bigger picture

. My mother had always been undiagnosed ocpd, and then a few years ago she had a delusional breakdown following an accident. Her " evidence" that doctors were trying to poison her and there was a conspiracy against her for writing a complaint was that she had seen a pile of papers on the doctors desk which obviously were her records and the letter of complaint ( could have been any other pile of paper) that the doctors had his name badge "turned around" so she could not know his name as he killed her and that she had seen a nurse laughing with a doctor , which she took to mean they were planning to do something bad to her.

Tiny little imagined details that my mother latched on to and formed on to a persecutory delusion. when she had the accident i feel like she lost control , she could not admit ultimately that it had been her fault , so to take back that control so she began to blame people around her and obsess over these delusional thoughts. it was better to make a delusion up than face the situation.

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@ferevece

i think that obessive thoughts can lead to delusons, especially when people with ocpd get obessed with details about things but miss the bigger picture

. My mother had always been undiagnosed ocpd, and then a few years ago she had a delusional breakdown following an accident. Her " evidence" that doctors were trying to poison her and there was a conspiracy against her for writing a complaint was that she had seen a pile of papers on the doctors desk which obviously were her records and the letter of complaint ( could have been any other pile of paper) that the doctors had his name badge "turned around" so she could not know his name as he killed her and that she had seen a nurse laughing with a doctor , which she took to mean they were planning to do something bad to her.

Tiny little imagined details that my mother latched on to and formed on to a persecutory delusion. when she had the accident i feel like she lost control , she could not admit ultimately that it had been her fault , so to take back that control so she began to blame people around her and obsess over these delusional thoughts. it was better to make a delusion up than face the situation.

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Hello @ferevece, Welcome to Mayo Connect

It sounds as if you have gotten some insight into your mother's problems with delusions. I have also seen that when people develop an "external locus of control" they feel like they can do no wrong, therefore it has to be someone else's fault. I have found that true in my own family as well.

How is your mom doing now? Has she recovered from her accident both physically and emotionally?

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Hi, @maryland677 – wondering how your dad is doing?

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