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sheeb
@sheeb

Posts: 14
Joined: Oct 28, 2017

Dizziness with ckd

Posted by @sheeb, Nov 17, 2017

I was diagnosed with stage 3B kidney disease a few months back. I am now suffering from dizziness. It’s slmost everyday. My doctor told me to drink a lot of water and stay away from salt. I’m wondering if here is more I can do.

REPLY

I have the same question. Same stage. Same advice from my doctor. See you in six months. Anyone in similar situation?

@jo54

I have the same question. Same stage. Same advice from my doctor. See you in six months. Anyone in similar situation?

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I just went to my regular doctor and she took blood looking for anemia. Also thought it could be vertigo. I will get the results tomorrow.

I have been diagnosed with vertigo for dizziness. Is it possible that there is a connection to the kidneys? I wouldn’t think so.

@jo54 Hi, Jo. Sorry to disagree, but it think it is very likely. The kidneys’ function is to eliminate poison (urine, chemicals, mis-folded protein, etc.} which basically function to interrupt the ongoing work of the rest of the body, including the brain, the heart, the nerves, etc.

Thank you so much. I will call the doctor Monday. No one has connected the two. This may be bad but knowledge is good. You are my hero.

I went do my regular doctor for my dizziness and was told all blood work was normal but that dizziness with ckd is common. My doctor suggested physical therapy which I may try.

I have CKD. At stage 4 I also had some dizziness. Mine turned out to be associated with the CKD, anemia and orthostatic BP. My doctor has been monitoring labs and adjusting meds. I also keep salt down and stay well hydrated. I’ve not needed dialysis yet (came close) and currently don’t need a transplant. My kidney function improved to a GFR of 35 so I guess I’m back to stage 3!

I had dizziness at stage 3 when I started to exercise. My bp was quite low (hovered around 102/65) so my nephrologist at Mayo took me off the 5mg of lisinopril I was on and that helped tremendously. My bp is now 120 or 125/70 and I’m able to exercise and not be dizzy. I’m now stage 4.

Lynn

@IWantToBelieve

I had dizziness at stage 3 when I started to exercise. My bp was quite low (hovered around 102/65) so my nephrologist at Mayo took me off the 5mg of lisinopril I was on and that helped tremendously. My bp is now 120 or 125/70 and I’m able to exercise and not be dizzy. I’m now stage 4.

Lynn

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I went to the doctor 2 weeks ago and my blood pressure was fine. I’ve gone the whole weekend without a dizzy spell. I’m hoping it is gone or at least gotten a bit better. Thank you for your help. It’s slways nice to know others are familiar with what I’m going through.

My vertigo is also gone. I know from experience that it will be back. Feels good to sit up and not feel dizzy. Enjoy your day.

@cehunt57

I have CKD. At stage 4 I also had some dizziness. Mine turned out to be associated with the CKD, anemia and orthostatic BP. My doctor has been monitoring labs and adjusting meds. I also keep salt down and stay well hydrated. I’ve not needed dialysis yet (came close) and currently don’t need a transplant. My kidney function improved to a GFR of 35 so I guess I’m back to stage 3!

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Glad you mentioned “orthostatic BP,” @cehunt57. When my CKD was diagnosed a few years ago, my nephrologist told me to change how I was taking my BP, citing the possibility that dizziness might be the result of orthostatic hypotension. That occurs when a person’s blood pressure falls after suddenly standing up from a lying or sitting position. It is defined as a fall in systolic blood pressure of at least 20 mm Hg or of diastolic blood pressure of at least 10 mm Hg when a person assumes a standing position. He asked me to report my BP in three ways — while sitting (as normal), while lying down, and immediately after standing up. After a few weeks, I automatically adjusted my posture to compensate from or overcome the dizziness, and I quit thinking about it. Now, on rare occasions, when dizziness recurs, I remember to check for “ortho-hypo.”

I’m in the same situation. Stage 3 kidney disease and it seems like the 3 nephrologist I went to, seem to wait for u to get on dialysis, which I’m not doing. They don’t even tell u the least amount of protein u eat the better for your Kidneys. That how on my own research I found out. And my gfr went from 54 to 70. That’s pretty good. My kidney dr. Burst my bubbly telling me it will fluctuate. I’m Sharon, good to talk to someone who has what I do. I also have Atrial fibrillation, pre diabetic, Lyme disease, COPD, etc.

I don’t have a nephrologist. Just my gp. I am stage 3. Doctor says wait till next blood test. New dr as I just moved. Kidney info new. Is there an advantage for specialist or do I wait for blood work?

@carnes

I’m in the same situation. Stage 3 kidney disease and it seems like the 3 nephrologist I went to, seem to wait for u to get on dialysis, which I’m not doing. They don’t even tell u the least amount of protein u eat the better for your Kidneys. That how on my own research I found out. And my gfr went from 54 to 70. That’s pretty good. My kidney dr. Burst my bubbly telling me it will fluctuate. I’m Sharon, good to talk to someone who has what I do. I also have Atrial fibrillation, pre diabetic, Lyme disease, COPD, etc.

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@carnes – What I’m going to share is my personal experience and knowledge relating to my specific disease (PKD). I’m not a nephrologist but I do know drinking a lot (at least 64 oz. a day), 2000mg of salt (no more than 5,000 which is near impossible if you eat out much) in your daily diet, low protein (1 gram of protein per kilogram of your body weight), no alcohol, and no more than two caffeinated drinks (a drink being 8 ounces) a day is good for the health of your kidneys.

Keeping your blood pressure under control is also important for the health of your kidneys as they regulate bp. So take any bp meds you might be prescribed and try to exercise because that will also maintain or lower your bp.

Motrin is also not recommended if you have kidney issues. I never start any new med without discussing it with my nephrologist at Mayo because some are really tough on the kidneys. As I’m sure you know, medications are usually filtered through your liver or kidneys. Some herbal supplements and over the counter meds should be avoided (one example is decongestants).

What that “diet” does to your GFR depends on what your health issues are. Usually when a GFR fluctuates it is within 5 points which is why it is called an eGFR (estimated GFR). There are also different ways to calculate GFR so if you went to a different lab on the same day your GFR could be different. I have never seen, or heard of, a jump from 54 to 70 so I’m inclined to think (again, I’m not a doctor) that the change in your diet is helping.

I too have a local nephrologist that was just waiting for me to get on dialysis because that is what he does – manages people on dialysis. When I was at the Mayo Clinic last month I learned that they offer educational classes about the kidneys, how they work and how to take care of them. If you are not near a Mayo Clinic perhaps you could find a similar class in your community.

Of course once your GFR gets below 20 you need to speak with a dietician because there are many changes that need to happen in your diet that I know little about. Hopefully you won’t get to that point.

Best of luck!

Lynn

@jo54 – Personally I’m a fan of specialists because they are usually more informed about treatment specific to the reason your kidney function is low and if they are good they should be informed about the newest treatments and latest research. They are specialists so they should know more than a general practitioner. I guess it depends on if your next blood work is in 3 months or a year (former is not bad but I wouldn’t wait for the latter) and if you are having any other symptoms of kidney failure. It also probably depends if they know why your kidney function is not in the normal range. The doctor might be waiting to see how quickly your GFR changes if he/she does not have previous labs to compare to. Some basic diet changes could be beneficial (see post from me above). Personally, I wouldn’t wait more than a year and I would make some of the basic dietary changes mentioned above (low protein, lots of water, low sodium) and exercise to keep your blood pressure in check.

Lynn

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