Diagnosed with mild dementia so what should I expect in future?

Posted by sarah49 @sarah49, Nov 12, 2018

I was diagnosed with mild dementia so what bodily & cognitively changes should I expect?

Hi, @sarah49, and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I'm hoping this will be a great place for you to get information and connect with others following your diagnosis of mild dementia.

Since you are wondering about what body and cognitive changes you might expect, I'd like to provide some Mayo Clinic information on dementia: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dementia/symptoms-causes/syc-20352013.

Did your doctor provide any additional information about what type of dementia you may have in mild form (e.g., vascular, frontotemporal, Lewy Body)?

@lisalucier

Hi, @sarah49, and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I'm hoping this will be a great place for you to get information and connect with others following your diagnosis of mild dementia.

Since you are wondering about what body and cognitive changes you might expect, I'd like to provide some Mayo Clinic information on dementia: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dementia/symptoms-causes/syc-20352013.

Did your doctor provide any additional information about what type of dementia you may have in mild form (e.g., vascular, frontotemporal, Lewy Body)?

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Thank you for your response and the reference in Mayo.com. I also joined exsmokers connection. Need lots of help with quitting my smoking addiction.

@lisalucier

Hi, @sarah49, and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I'm hoping this will be a great place for you to get information and connect with others following your diagnosis of mild dementia.

Since you are wondering about what body and cognitive changes you might expect, I'd like to provide some Mayo Clinic information on dementia: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dementia/symptoms-causes/syc-20352013.

Did your doctor provide any additional information about what type of dementia you may have in mild form (e.g., vascular, frontotemporal, Lewy Body)?

Jump to this post

Not much info on Lewy Body Dementia from Neuropychologist but thanks for your info given on Mayo. Very helpful Sarah49

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@sarah49

Not much info on Lewy Body Dementia from Neuropychologist but thanks for your info given on Mayo. Very helpful Sarah49

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Hi, @sarah49 – Since you mentioned wanting to quit smoking, I wanted to suggest this discussion on Connect on quitting for reading through and participating, if you'd like: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/stop-smoking-panic-attacks

Just wanted to clarify: Was your diagnosis Lewy Body Dementia, then?

Hello @sarah49 and welcome to Mayo Connect,

I can understand your interest in wanting to know, "what to expect," that is a natural question that we all have when we face any illness or disorder.

Lewy Body Dementia Association (LBDA) has a website with a list of support groups. As you did not mention what state you lived in perhaps you can check out support groups in your area. There you will meet with others who can offer you some first hand knowledge and experience with LBD. Here is a link to the support groups, https://www.lbda.org/support

If you are comfortable sharing more about yourself. For example: What symptoms were you having that led to this diagnosis? Were the symptoms physical (such as gait/balance) disturbances as well as cognitive, such as memory, attention, etc.? Were any therapies suggested for gait, balance, speech, etc.?

What information has your doctor given you thus far?

@sarah49

Not much info on Lewy Body Dementia from Neuropychologist but thanks for your info given on Mayo. Very helpful Sarah49

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Hi, @sarah49 – wanted to check in with you and see how you are doing?

Have you been given a diagnosis of your type of Dementia? It makes a big difference what to offer and what to expect as far as progression, issues, treatment etc. I can help a lot better if you could provide this. In general though there are many types of Dementia. Each has some unique characteristics and issues. Mild Dementia is very treatable and a good speech or occupational therapist can provide a lot of compensatory strategies to overcome the issues. One good one is to keep a notebook or smartphone with you at all times to keep track of things. Write everything you need to know or remember down with a date and time, even directions or sequence or schedule of things you need to do. That way you can get used to referencing back to it now when it can become a habit. For example, schedule out your day with a plan and use a checklist for when you need to take your meds (and mark it done when you do), pick up the kids, etc. or have a friend or relative call and remind you. Allow yourself extra time to do things so you stay relaxed, stress only exacerbates things. Put a note at the door or taped to the bathroom mirror or fridge to remind you to check the oven and stove are off, doors are locked and you have your keys with you and such. Sticky notes are great for reminders. Label drawers and closets what is inside them so you can locate them more easily. Do a picture board of family and friends with their names, birthdates, and relationship to you. Try not to stress when you can't remember something. Sit for a few minutes and rest. Sometimes it just needs some time to come back to you. Don't be too hard on yourself. It's not your fault nor is memory loss related to intelligence.

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