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weber52151
@weber52151

Posts: 3
Joined: Sep 12, 2018

Dealing with Cerebral Palsy

Posted by @weber52151, Wed, Sep 12 11:23am

I am new to this group and am looking for information. I am 40 year's old with CP and am wondering if anyone can provide ideas for home modifications or tools to make my home more handicap friendly?

REPLY

@weber52151

Does anyone have a suggestion for a group on the connect site that focus on cerebral palsy?

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@weber52151 My youngest son has cerebral palsy. I am unaware of any groups, but am willing to discuss what I have experienced with you.

Does anyone have a suggestion for a group on the connect site that focus on cerebral palsy?

Liked by marystefy

Hi @weber52151, Welcome to Connect. I merged your original post (along with @2011panc's response) to this new discussion you started dedicated to Cerebral Palsy. Thank you for getting the conversation started.

Weber, I'd like to hear more about your request asking other members about home modifications to make your home more handicap friendly. I'm sure you've been adapting your living space and also have tips to share. Are you facing a new challenge or is there a particular improvements you'd like to see?

Which limbs are affected and what difficulties do you have? Also, what state do you live in and are you able to work? I also have CP, extensive knowledge, and I am a retired disability advocate.

@2011panc

@weber52151 My youngest son has cerebral palsy. I am unaware of any groups, but am willing to discuss what I have experienced with you.

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There are plenty of resources available on the internet. Depending on where you live, there are also local resources.

@weber52151 I am not sure of your exact situation, but here are some things I have learned. If you legs are involved and you use a walker, crutches or wheelchair, pick up all area rugs and if possible choose linoleum, stone or wood floors. Hard flooring is easier to move across with adaptive equipment. If you are on your knees, get some knee pads, either sport or construction, depending on what feels better for you.
If you have poor sitting balance, make sure you have safety belts on all chairs. Use pads and pillows to make your chairs as comfortable and correct for your posture as possible.
If your hands/arms are involved get plates/cups that will stick to the surface it is placed upon and look for utensils with large, easy to grip handles. Don't be afraid to use a clothing cover to catch and absorb spills. Have your drinks placed in covered glasses/cups with handles and use a straw when drinking.
Complete your physical exercises and stretching every day to maintain as much function as possible.
I hope some of this helps you. Blessings to you.

@2011panc

@weber52151 I am not sure of your exact situation, but here are some things I have learned. If you legs are involved and you use a walker, crutches or wheelchair, pick up all area rugs and if possible choose linoleum, stone or wood floors. Hard flooring is easier to move across with adaptive equipment. If you are on your knees, get some knee pads, either sport or construction, depending on what feels better for you.
If you have poor sitting balance, make sure you have safety belts on all chairs. Use pads and pillows to make your chairs as comfortable and correct for your posture as possible.
If your hands/arms are involved get plates/cups that will stick to the surface it is placed upon and look for utensils with large, easy to grip handles. Don't be afraid to use a clothing cover to catch and absorb spills. Have your drinks placed in covered glasses/cups with handles and use a straw when drinking.
Complete your physical exercises and stretching every day to maintain as much function as possible.
I hope some of this helps you. Blessings to you.

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Thank you so much

@emgold2013

There are plenty of resources available on the internet. Depending on where you live, there are also local resources.

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The first place I would start is to find your local Center For Independent Living, if you live in the US. They have access to government grants to make modifications to your home. Then, if you need modifications to your house, and you are working or employable and you need the modifications in order to work, contact your local Vocational Rehabilitation office.

@emgold2013

The first place I would start is to find your local Center For Independent Living, if you live in the US. They have access to government grants to make modifications to your home. Then, if you need modifications to your house, and you are working or employable and you need the modifications in order to work, contact your local Vocational Rehabilitation office.

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Two other resources for assistance is United Cerebral Palsy at ucp.org and your local 211 information and referral service.

There are also plenty of disability catalogs on the internet if you do a seach.

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