Chronic kidney disease (CKD) & bone loss (osteoporosis)

Posted by benjamin8161 @benjamin8161, Mar 27 10:24pm

Just a general question i want to run by the group here. I am experiencing bone loss due to CKD. I am curious to know if anyone with stem cell therapy has any indication that if I were to get my kidneys taken care of through stem cell therapy, will my bone health return to normalization? or is this a disease that I will have to endure (bone weakness) for life? Let me know please, thanks

@benjamin8161 Was not aware that CKD could lead to bone loss. Will be very interested in replies. Wish I could be of help to you, but glad you brought up the subject.

Liked by cehunt57, fiesty76

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@benjamin8161 and @trishanna, I am interested in this question as well because I was diagnosed with osteoporosis several years (8-10) before being diagnosed just barely a yr ago for stage 3 CKD. No doc has mentioned a connection between the two to me. I take once/yr reclast infusions, along with calcium and vit D3 for the osteo. Benjamin, which doc gave you the info about CKD being the cause of bone loss? I've been on various meds for the osteo over the years and my docs told me that it will be a continuing diagnosis for me to deal with. The reclast slightly improved my bone scores during the first 2-3 yrs. Now, the hope is to maintain my present density scores. Both my mom and sister also had osteo but neither were ever diagnosed with CKD. Would be interesting to hear from others on this too?

Liked by cehunt57

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@benjamin8161 I am curious what stage of Chronic Kidney Disease you are currently at, and the cause of the CKD?

This is from the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/kidney-disease/mineral-bone-disorder#:~:text=When%20kidneys%20do%20not%20function,mineral%20levels%20in%20the%20body.:
"Chronic kidney disease is kidney damage that occurs slowly over many years, often due to diabetes or high blood pressure. Once damaged, the kidneys can’t filter blood as they should.
Hormones and minerals are important because they help bones stay strong. If a person’s hormones and minerals are out of balance, his or her bones can become weak and malformed.
Parathyroid hormone plays an important role in controlling calcium levels in the blood. When kidneys do not function properly, extra parathyroid hormone is released in the blood to move calcium from inside the bones into the blood.
Chronic kidney disease causes mineral and bone disorder because the kidneys do not properly balance the mineral levels in the body. The kidneys stop activating calcitriol and do not remove the phosphorus in the blood properly.
The complications of mineral and bone disorder in CKD include slowed bone growth and deformities, and heart and blood vessel problems.
Treating mineral and bone disorder in CKD includes preventing damage to bones by controlling parathyroid hormone levels through changes in eating, diet, and nutrition; medications and supplements; and dialysis.
Reducing dietary intake of phosphorus is one of the most important steps in preventing bone disease.
If diet, medications, and dialysis can’t control parathyroid hormone levels, a surgeon can remove one or more of the parathyroid glands."

And from the same NIDDK site: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/kidney-disease/mineral-bone-disorder

From the National Kidney Foundation, here is their take on the issue: https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/MineralBoneDisorder

And from Mayo Clinic, their discussion on Chronic Kidney Disease includes the complication of bone loss https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/chronic-kidney-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20354521

Our kidneys do so much for our bodies! Who would have thought?!
Ginger

REPLY
@gingerw

@benjamin8161 I am curious what stage of Chronic Kidney Disease you are currently at, and the cause of the CKD?

This is from the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/kidney-disease/mineral-bone-disorder#:~:text=When%20kidneys%20do%20not%20function,mineral%20levels%20in%20the%20body.:
"Chronic kidney disease is kidney damage that occurs slowly over many years, often due to diabetes or high blood pressure. Once damaged, the kidneys can’t filter blood as they should.
Hormones and minerals are important because they help bones stay strong. If a person’s hormones and minerals are out of balance, his or her bones can become weak and malformed.
Parathyroid hormone plays an important role in controlling calcium levels in the blood. When kidneys do not function properly, extra parathyroid hormone is released in the blood to move calcium from inside the bones into the blood.
Chronic kidney disease causes mineral and bone disorder because the kidneys do not properly balance the mineral levels in the body. The kidneys stop activating calcitriol and do not remove the phosphorus in the blood properly.
The complications of mineral and bone disorder in CKD include slowed bone growth and deformities, and heart and blood vessel problems.
Treating mineral and bone disorder in CKD includes preventing damage to bones by controlling parathyroid hormone levels through changes in eating, diet, and nutrition; medications and supplements; and dialysis.
Reducing dietary intake of phosphorus is one of the most important steps in preventing bone disease.
If diet, medications, and dialysis can’t control parathyroid hormone levels, a surgeon can remove one or more of the parathyroid glands."

And from the same NIDDK site: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/kidney-disease/mineral-bone-disorder

From the National Kidney Foundation, here is their take on the issue: https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/MineralBoneDisorder

And from Mayo Clinic, their discussion on Chronic Kidney Disease includes the complication of bone loss https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/chronic-kidney-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20354521

Our kidneys do so much for our bodies! Who would have thought?!
Ginger

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@gingerw, thanks for this. Too much phosphorus contributes to bone loss which is why monitoring phosphorus intake is so important on a renal diet. Animal protein binds phosphorus less than plant protein, meaning that on a vegetarian or plant-based diet, phosphorus is natutally "bound" and is not as readily absorbed by the body as animal-based. Therefore the kidneys don't have to work so hard to filter out excess phosphorus. Read labels as there are hidden phosphates in many, many foods like pyrophosphate and phosphate-containiing baking powder. One way to limit phosphorus is to use baking soda and vinegar instead of baking powder even though this substitute is higher in sodium. Another reason to have small portions of certain foods. . . My three recipe collections address this issue to varying degrees. Boring statistics literally can help with quality of life as well as longevity.

REPLY
@gingerw

@benjamin8161 I am curious what stage of Chronic Kidney Disease you are currently at, and the cause of the CKD?

This is from the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/kidney-disease/mineral-bone-disorder#:~:text=When%20kidneys%20do%20not%20function,mineral%20levels%20in%20the%20body.:
"Chronic kidney disease is kidney damage that occurs slowly over many years, often due to diabetes or high blood pressure. Once damaged, the kidneys can’t filter blood as they should.
Hormones and minerals are important because they help bones stay strong. If a person’s hormones and minerals are out of balance, his or her bones can become weak and malformed.
Parathyroid hormone plays an important role in controlling calcium levels in the blood. When kidneys do not function properly, extra parathyroid hormone is released in the blood to move calcium from inside the bones into the blood.
Chronic kidney disease causes mineral and bone disorder because the kidneys do not properly balance the mineral levels in the body. The kidneys stop activating calcitriol and do not remove the phosphorus in the blood properly.
The complications of mineral and bone disorder in CKD include slowed bone growth and deformities, and heart and blood vessel problems.
Treating mineral and bone disorder in CKD includes preventing damage to bones by controlling parathyroid hormone levels through changes in eating, diet, and nutrition; medications and supplements; and dialysis.
Reducing dietary intake of phosphorus is one of the most important steps in preventing bone disease.
If diet, medications, and dialysis can’t control parathyroid hormone levels, a surgeon can remove one or more of the parathyroid glands."

And from the same NIDDK site: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/kidney-disease/mineral-bone-disorder

From the National Kidney Foundation, here is their take on the issue: https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/MineralBoneDisorder

And from Mayo Clinic, their discussion on Chronic Kidney Disease includes the complication of bone loss https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/chronic-kidney-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20354521

Our kidneys do so much for our bodies! Who would have thought?!
Ginger

Jump to this post

@gingerw, Thank you so much for this excellent information and for the links as well. If bookmarked, can someone to return to it later to reread? As an active poster, I sometimes unintentionally delete an intended "saved" post. I will copy and paste the links to a word doc. "just in case" .

REPLY
@fiesty76

@gingerw, Thank you so much for this excellent information and for the links as well. If bookmarked, can someone to return to it later to reread? As an active poster, I sometimes unintentionally delete an intended "saved" post. I will copy and paste the links to a word doc. "just in case" .

Jump to this post

@fiesty76 Yes! Bookmarking will let you see this later. Glad to hear you got something out of the post.
Ginger

Liked by fiesty76

REPLY
@gingerw

@benjamin8161 I am curious what stage of Chronic Kidney Disease you are currently at, and the cause of the CKD?

This is from the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive, and Kidney Diseases https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/kidney-disease/mineral-bone-disorder#:~:text=When%20kidneys%20do%20not%20function,mineral%20levels%20in%20the%20body.:
"Chronic kidney disease is kidney damage that occurs slowly over many years, often due to diabetes or high blood pressure. Once damaged, the kidneys can’t filter blood as they should.
Hormones and minerals are important because they help bones stay strong. If a person’s hormones and minerals are out of balance, his or her bones can become weak and malformed.
Parathyroid hormone plays an important role in controlling calcium levels in the blood. When kidneys do not function properly, extra parathyroid hormone is released in the blood to move calcium from inside the bones into the blood.
Chronic kidney disease causes mineral and bone disorder because the kidneys do not properly balance the mineral levels in the body. The kidneys stop activating calcitriol and do not remove the phosphorus in the blood properly.
The complications of mineral and bone disorder in CKD include slowed bone growth and deformities, and heart and blood vessel problems.
Treating mineral and bone disorder in CKD includes preventing damage to bones by controlling parathyroid hormone levels through changes in eating, diet, and nutrition; medications and supplements; and dialysis.
Reducing dietary intake of phosphorus is one of the most important steps in preventing bone disease.
If diet, medications, and dialysis can’t control parathyroid hormone levels, a surgeon can remove one or more of the parathyroid glands."

And from the same NIDDK site: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/kidney-disease/mineral-bone-disorder

From the National Kidney Foundation, here is their take on the issue: https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/MineralBoneDisorder

And from Mayo Clinic, their discussion on Chronic Kidney Disease includes the complication of bone loss https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/chronic-kidney-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20354521

Our kidneys do so much for our bodies! Who would have thought?!
Ginger

Jump to this post

Thanks so much for your informative reply. I have stage 4 kidney disease and my nephrologist had me stop taking calcium. My calcium levels were normal. I have severe osteoporosis not taking any medication for it. Diagnosed with osteo over a year ago. Primary care and nephrologist have not spoken together yet.

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@trishanna

@benjamin8161 Was not aware that CKD could lead to bone loss. Will be very interested in replies. Wish I could be of help to you, but glad you brought up the subject.

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I read recently that high phosphorous levels as a result of CKD causes calcium to leech from your bones

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