Celiac Disease/IBS and Tachycardia

Posted by jjren @jjren, Mar 29, 2019

Does anyone diagnosed with Celiac Disease, IBS or any other GI condition have episodes of tachycardia (fast heart rate)? I have issues with my ascending colon and am wondering if my intestine is pressing on anything causing the tachycardia.

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@jjrenn – tachycardia has several causes. I experienced it with MALS, when celiac artery is compressed by a ligament. This was before diagnosis. My daughter developed tachycardia out of the blue- she was later diagnosed with Cushing’s Disease- overproduction of cortisol. In her case there was a pituitary tumor. Same could happen with tumor in adrenal gland, causing overproduction of cortisol- leading to tachycardia.

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I was diagnosed with celiac disease in my 20's and have IBS-C (forever). Two and a half years was diagnosed with non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. I had had non-serious palpitations off and on over the years. Best to discuss with your doctor. My diagnosis came from having worn a 48 hour holter monitor. No doctor has ever mentioned to me a connection between the colon and my heart. I tend to think in my own particular case, I inherited this from my dad who had heart issues.

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Yes I have celiac disease and IBS-C and non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. Re the heart : it is an electricity problem. Not related to the colon. Need to have a stress test and maybe wear a holter monitor. See a cardiologist.

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Yes I have had tachycardia, never thought of being related to Celiac, but everything else is in the body. Celiac is only started in the small intestine, but it effects every part of your body that needs to grow. There is apx a 40% greater chance of having heart problems if you have Celiac. The Celiac Foundation has great up to the minute facts. Just like my arteriosclerosis, a 90% blocked leg artery, osteoporosis, after lifting weights for 40 years and no family have it. Then there is peripheral neuropathy in legs and arms. My foggy brain is maddening. There are 200 symptoms and associated health problems. I am a Celiac Ambassador for the Celiac Foundation and I will take every opportunity to teach facts about Celiac.

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@astaingegerdm

@jjrenn – tachycardia has several causes. I experienced it with MALS, when celiac artery is compressed by a ligament. This was before diagnosis. My daughter developed tachycardia out of the blue- she was later diagnosed with Cushing’s Disease- overproduction of cortisol. In her case there was a pituitary tumor. Same could happen with tumor in adrenal gland, causing overproduction of cortisol- leading to tachycardia.

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What are you calling a celiac artery? Celiac effects your entire body. I have never heard of a compression problem with a ligament.

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@sue225

I was diagnosed with celiac disease in my 20's and have IBS-C (forever). Two and a half years was diagnosed with non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. I had had non-serious palpitations off and on over the years. Best to discuss with your doctor. My diagnosis came from having worn a 48 hour holter monitor. No doctor has ever mentioned to me a connection between the colon and my heart. I tend to think in my own particular case, I inherited this from my dad who had heart issues.

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You need to read favpcts about Celiac. It is a genetic disease that effects 1 out of 100 people, but 80% are not diagnosed. Please go to the Celiac Foundation and get the facts. Celiac is not just a small intestine problem, but your entire body is effected. Even your brain.

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@pwgrimes

You need to read favpcts about Celiac. It is a genetic disease that effects 1 out of 100 people, but 80% are not diagnosed. Please go to the Celiac Foundation and get the facts. Celiac is not just a small intestine problem, but your entire body is effected. Even your brain.

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Thanks, I do know all that "stuff". Used to be quite involved with the celiac association at the local level. Yes, once you have celiac disease, you usually wind up with more autoimmune conditions.

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Celiac has been doing trails for possible medications that will help. The knowledge about Celiac has grown incredible. Just like people still think it is just a “colon” problem. I am an ambassador for the Celiac Foundation and will take every opportunity to share the facts that are being uncovered constantly. This year is the first year our government has a congressional committee for Celiac. It will also fund research for the first time. Doctors have not been taught about it in medical school and that is why 80% are not diagnosed. It is rare to find a doctor, even a gastroenterologist who knows about Celiac and what it is.

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@pwgrimes

What are you calling a celiac artery? Celiac effects your entire body. I have never heard of a compression problem with a ligament.

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@pwgrimes– the word celiac itself is referring to something abdominal.
Celiac disease is an abdominal disease. The celiac artery supplies blood to intestines and abdominal organs.
If the celiac artery is compressed, there is not enough blood for intestines to do work needed for digestion- therefore pain that is similar to pain when coronary artery is blocked- angina.
Celiac disease is difficult to diagnose at times and is difficult to live with. My two daughters have celiac disease. I agree that there is not much information about it- many doctors are not aware of how common it is.

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