Can Prolia be safely and reasonably discontinued at a certain age?

Posted by kdryder @kdryder, Mar 5 7:26pm

My wife is 85 years old, taking Prolia, and has recently moved to an assisted living facility. It is very difficult for her to travel from the ALF, and she does not wish to do so for any reason. Is there a point at which it is reasonable to discontinue Prolia infusions? (Note: The ALF will not do infusions on site.)

How long has she been on Prolia? When coming off she would need a relay drug like Fosamax or Actonel ( a pill she would take) to help prevent spinal fractures. At least, this is what I’ve been told and is what I’m doing after having been on Prolia for 3 years. Wishing you and your wife the best.

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@dappy

How long has she been on Prolia? When coming off she would need a relay drug like Fosamax or Actonel ( a pill she would take) to help prevent spinal fractures. At least, this is what I’ve been told and is what I’m doing after having been on Prolia for 3 years. Wishing you and your wife the best.

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Thanks much for the advice. This gives us a viable option for when she is completely unable to travel.

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@kdryder

Thanks much for the advice. This gives us a viable option for when she is completely unable to travel.

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@kdryder Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect.

It is understandable your wife would want to discontinue a drug that requires her to travel, when traveling is difficult.

It looks like you received the information and support you were looking for.

I'm wondering if the facility she is at is able to do a treatment there?

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Thank you for your response to my question. Unfortunately, the ALF where my wife resides has flatly refused to perform any infusions on-site. The ALF attitude was extremely unhelpful, to say the least. Apparently, their plan is to have residents die in place with minimal fuss.

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That’s so sad. Perhaps list their name so others don’t live in such an uncaring establishment

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@kdryder

Thank you for your response to my question. Unfortunately, the ALF where my wife resides has flatly refused to perform any infusions on-site. The ALF attitude was extremely unhelpful, to say the least. Apparently, their plan is to have residents die in place with minimal fuss.

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@kdryder You have received wonderful support from members @dappy @lustarr

I have no words. Unacceptable is a gross understatement. May I ask what their reasoning is regarding infusions?

I assume you have considered these options but, is there a way she can go to another facility, can a provider meet her at the facility, and do they have providers that come to the facility and if so could you discuss this topic with them directly?

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I have been on Prolia for several years as an injection given by the nurse at my doctors office. Is that the same as an infusion? Is Prolia provided in different methods?

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I'm not sure about the past treatments my wife has had, but her current Prolia regimen is an injection. I misspoke by using the term "infusion." It is as quick and painless as a flu shot.

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@kdryder

Thank you for your response to my question. Unfortunately, the ALF where my wife resides has flatly refused to perform any infusions on-site. The ALF attitude was extremely unhelpful, to say the least. Apparently, their plan is to have residents die in place with minimal fuss.

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@kdryder This is simply unacceptable. Is it a case that they don't have medical qualifications and certifications to be able to perform that type of thing?

I can only imagine your frustration. I hope you find a solution to this.
JK

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Would they allow you to have a nurse come to the facility to give the shot? I would think you can get a per diem nurse willing to do this. I am so sorry you have to struggle with this situation.

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Please be careful! I can only share my own terrible experience. I'd been on Prolia several years and because of a change of doctors (one retired) my shot was a few weeks late. During that time three vertebrae broke leaving me in constant pain and unable to resume many normal activities, travel, etc. But because I am ON Prolia I have macular degeneration in BOTH eyes requiring treatment by a retinal specialist – which includes periodic shots IN the eye! I wish that I had never gone near Prolia!

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@joan26

Please be careful! I can only share my own terrible experience. I'd been on Prolia several years and because of a change of doctors (one retired) my shot was a few weeks late. During that time three vertebrae broke leaving me in constant pain and unable to resume many normal activities, travel, etc. But because I am ON Prolia I have macular degeneration in BOTH eyes requiring treatment by a retinal specialist – which includes periodic shots IN the eye! I wish that I had never gone near Prolia!

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I took it three times and after the third, I felt like a had a terrible case of the flu which lasted. Aches, pains, upper respiratory. Saw no difference in dexascan so stopped taking it. Have a friend who took 8 and got hives after the last and that ended her journey with prolia. I try to walk and work on balance but I know there is risk of the F word for all of us over 60 (F word meaning Fall). I guess the ALF has rules which precludes staff but you would think that a call to the woman's insurance company, Like Blues on Call that Highmark offers, would be able to help with a solution. I find Highmark customer reps to be exceptionally patient and helpful.

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