Burning legs at night. Could something else be causing it?

Posted by robtlhughes @robtlhughes, Dec 13, 2020

I was diagnosed with poly neuropathy about two years ago. Had symptoms–feet sensitive to bed sheets–about a year before that. It has progressed up my legs to my knees. But instead of sensitivity my legs burn at night, maybe starting an hour after I get in bed. It's barely noticeable during the day. A month ago I had an MRI. Among other age-related (79) issues, there was mild and moderate spinal stenosis is various places. Could burning come from a nerve that gets pinched when I'm lying down? My wife also has PN but along with more severe lower back issues. She gets a steroid injection in her back three or four times a years. And that knocks out her leg burning at night. My neurologist hasn't paid much attention to my MRI. But I wonder why PN would care if I'm lying down or not. (Two Old Goats lotions or frankincense and myrrh helps some.)

Hi @robtlhughes – Burning sensation in the feet and legs is one of the symptoms associated with neuropathy but I believe there are also other conditions that can cause the symptoms. There is another discussion that you may be interested in – Small Fiber Neuropathy burning?: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/small-fiber-neuropathy-burning/

Have you discussed the burning with your doctor or neurologist to confirm it's related or if laying down at night may be pinching a nerve and causing the burning?

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I also have burning in my feet and ankles shortly after going to bed. I usually use ice packs on my ankles for 30 minutes or so and it goes away. I have seen several neurologists over the past couple of years. My primary neurologist had muscle and skin biopsies done and says I don't have small cell neuropathy. Other specialists say I don't have CDIP, or inclusion body myositis. But then recently the primary neurologist said I had myositis.?? I am seeing my rheumatologist in a few days to see if she has any ideas. In the meantime, I have increasing pain and weakness that is somewhat controlled by gabapentin and tramadol. I am unable to do much of anything due to the weakness. I also have osteoporosis and I need to exercise but that is difficult to do with any consistency. I don't understand why it is so difficult to get a definitive diagnosis. It seems like these symptoms are fairly common. All he knows for sure (??) is that it is inflammation supposedly in the muscles. s

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@robtlhughes and @catharbert, Here are a few links I found that may help provide more information.

"Venous reflux occurs when the veins in the leg aren't properly circulating blood to the heart. It's also referred to as venous insufficiency. If a leg vein fails, the blood can back up, pool, and leak into the leg tissue. This leads to a hot or burning sensation often accompanied by discoloration and itching." – Burning Legs: Causes, Treatments, and Symptoms: https://www.healthline.com/health/burning-legs

Causes and treatments for burning legs: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326371

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Many thanks. This could be very helpful.

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@catharbert

I also have burning in my feet and ankles shortly after going to bed. I usually use ice packs on my ankles for 30 minutes or so and it goes away. I have seen several neurologists over the past couple of years. My primary neurologist had muscle and skin biopsies done and says I don't have small cell neuropathy. Other specialists say I don't have CDIP, or inclusion body myositis. But then recently the primary neurologist said I had myositis.?? I am seeing my rheumatologist in a few days to see if she has any ideas. In the meantime, I have increasing pain and weakness that is somewhat controlled by gabapentin and tramadol. I am unable to do much of anything due to the weakness. I also have osteoporosis and I need to exercise but that is difficult to do with any consistency. I don't understand why it is so difficult to get a definitive diagnosis. It seems like these symptoms are fairly common. All he knows for sure (??) is that it is inflammation supposedly in the muscles. s

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Many thanks. I've seen three neurologists, one where I live and a two at teaching universites with excellent reputations. A doctor at one hospital says that I should hurry back for another test if my legs are getting week. The other doctor says the chances of a test showing anything treatable are "vanishingly small." I'm believe the second doctor's correct. Do they sell topical pain relievers in 55-gallon drums?

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