blood pressure & hypertension

Posted by kathy @llecrup, Jul 26, 2016

has anyone dealt with resistant hypertension?

@lugal

I need to take medication for high blood pressure, but every type of meds that have been prescribed for me upset my stomach. Does anyone have any hints on how to take the pills without making me sick.

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Hi, @lugal. Could you tell us what meds have been prescribed for you and caused you stomach distress? That would help us zero-in on some of the dozens of medications given to hypertensives like me. I’m not the champion user of many medications, but I have sampled at least one of all of the major groups that are popular. That’s due to changing doctors from time to time as well as changing medical programs from time to time. My current HMO relieved my Internal Medicine doctor of my problem and sent me over to Nephrology, where I have had my best care — mainly because my problem is kidney-related, as most hypertension problems are. My nephrologist brought in an endocrinologist to do some hormone tests. After I developed atrial fibrillation, I added a Cardiologist to my medical team. My team leader, though, is the nephrologist.

I don’t recall digestive problems from hypertension meds of any kind. This may be due to initial low dosages when a new medication is added, rising as I got accustomed to them. Most notably, though, the detailed patient label that comes with a new medication is crucial, because it clearly directs how to take the medication — often with food, which avoids stomach upset, and sometimes with a full glass of water. When to take it is important also, and that usually comes from the prescribing doctor, which requires a good measure of friendly and regular communication.

A further complication can be conflict with other medications or supplements you are taking. Once again, your doctor is your best advisor on this, although a half-dozen web sites are available to help, and your pharmacist also can give good advice. Finally, check into that Mayo web page that @kanaazpererira suggested — http://mayocl.in/2emxkRJ — it provides a framework for thinking about the meds you need.

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Thank you everyone for responding to my post. It helps to know that others have the same problem. The medications that I have tried are Cozaar, Norvasc, Avapro, Zaroxolyn, Toprol, Lisinopril, Edarbi. I am currently taking Bystolic, which is a beta blocker. I take it after dinner, and it doesn’t help the nausea. I’ve been to several doctors, and none of them have given me any advice on avoiding it. In fact, they seem to get annoyed at my problem. Lacey, taking a Zantac in the morning sounds like a good idea. I’m seeing a new doctor next week and I willl ask him about it.

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@lugal

Thank you everyone for responding to my post. It helps to know that others have the same problem. The medications that I have tried are Cozaar, Norvasc, Avapro, Zaroxolyn, Toprol, Lisinopril, Edarbi. I am currently taking Bystolic, which is a beta blocker. I take it after dinner, and it doesn’t help the nausea. I’ve been to several doctors, and none of them have given me any advice on avoiding it. In fact, they seem to get annoyed at my problem. Lacey, taking a Zantac in the morning sounds like a good idea. I’m seeing a new doctor next week and I willl ask him about it.

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Remember now, that Zantac is an over the counter medication, it is not addictive and it really works good, I hope you received the additional note to drink plenty of water during the day, it keeps the acid down and your stomach will love it a lot more. God Bless, keep me up to date, Lacey

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Hi Lacey – Yes, I got the note about drinking plenty of water. Thanks again for your help. I’ll keep you posted.

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@lugal

Thank you everyone for responding to my post. It helps to know that others have the same problem. The medications that I have tried are Cozaar, Norvasc, Avapro, Zaroxolyn, Toprol, Lisinopril, Edarbi. I am currently taking Bystolic, which is a beta blocker. I take it after dinner, and it doesn’t help the nausea. I’ve been to several doctors, and none of them have given me any advice on avoiding it. In fact, they seem to get annoyed at my problem. Lacey, taking a Zantac in the morning sounds like a good idea. I’m seeing a new doctor next week and I willl ask him about it.

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Thanks for the additional information, @lugal. You have been treated to 5 different types of hypertension medications — beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, thiazide diuretics, ACE inhibitors, and Angiotensin II receptor antagonists. There have been 3 different drugs in this last group plus another (the ACE inhibitor) that alleviate blood vessel constriction caused by kidney-produced hormones. The 2 beta blockers are often chosen to lower heart contractions and relax blood vessels, as do calcium channel blockers.

If that’s what your medical team had in mind, 7 of your 8 blood pressure meds were aimed at relaxing your blood vessels so blood passes through more readily at lower pressure. Your other med, the diuretic, aimed to cut down on sodium retained by your kidney, causing fluid retention in tissues and squeezing blood vessels from the outside. So all 8 meds might have been aimed at relaxing your blood vesssels.

In contrast, I have been treated to 12 different drugs in 8 different types of hypertension medications and am now on a fixed program of one diuretic (a special one), one beta blocker, and one ACE inhibitor. My only intestinal distress comes from large evening meals loaded with starches and sugars, especially from eating late — easy symptoms to overcome. How I got to this formula may be instructive.

I started with an internal medicine doctor who fancied himself the equal of a cardiologist. Two of his colleagues later took me in different directions, casting around for medications to harness my symptoms, but not looking for the underlying cause of my problem. They said my hypertension was “essential,” which means they had no idea what was causing it or how to find its cause.

In 2003, my new HMO started on the same cardiology track, which proved fruitless. Then a new HMO policy sent hypertensives like me to Nephrology for diagnosis and treatment, because most blood pressure problems originate with the kidneys and the adrenal glands on their surface. My first nephrologist — an aging veteran — followed the standard blunder-buss strategy — one drug after another — searching for symptom relief. I asked him to help me get a second opinion, and he kindly referred me to another nephrologist.

My second nephrologist said from the beginning that she would focus on finding the cause of my hypertension and engage an endocrinologist in the effort. They examined every hormone imaginable and found that I have an inherited kidney deficiency called Liddle Syndrome. In brief, I had been treated for years for “essential” hypertension that caused depleted potassium — I even took huge potassium supplements for a couple of years. In the end, the diagnosis was the opposite: hypertension caused BY depleted potassium which my kidneys were unable to reclaim. My central medication is now a potassium-sparing diuretic, which I support with foods that are high in potassium like prune juice, raisins, and coconut water (bananas are only moderate potassium supplements and offer too much sugar, starch, and fat).

I can’t say that my experiences contain any answers for you, but I hope they will provoke questions that you might pose to your medical team. Keep us posted so we can refine our thoughts in hope of helping you find the solution you want!
Martin

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@predictable Thank you for sharing your story with me. It’s given me a lot of food for thought. I’m seeing a new doctor this week, and, thanks to you, I have formulated a list of questions to ask.

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@colleenyoung

Welcome to Connect, Kathy. Let me introduce you to a few members here dealing with hypertension. Please meet @predictable, @contender1 @mikefox909 @martishka @nadine66 and @teatime.

@llecrup how are currently managing your hypertension? We look forward to getting to know a bit more about you.

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Hello. I have never had high blood pressure, I am a healthy active person who one day, felt super light headed, arms were tingling, head tingling, forgetting things so I went and had my blood pressure checked at Walgreens and it was 220/111. I have since been seen by doctors, and checked out. My blood pressure does not run high, but then I will have these random spikes up into the 170's with several other symptoms: dizzy, tingling in my head, numbness in my face and arms, stuttering my words, cannot concentrate to put together a sentance, crying spells, bascally mentally block out. These can last a few minutes or a few hours. Sometimes medicine will bring it down, other times it just keeps going up and symptoms magnify, end up at ER at 207/106 to get something to bring it down because it just keeps going up. I have been tested extensively by neurologitst, endocronologists, cardiologists … had my nerves tested, my sleep tested, 72hr EEG, blood sugar tested…nobody seems to be able to figure out what is bringing on these episodes. My doctors believe that something in either my endo or nuero area are haywire. It happens when I am over stimulated, like a massage (weird), or pressure in my head, landing in a plane. But regular things that would cause high BP, mine is normal. I was in a car accident recently and my BP was 140/84….nothing! Does anyone else have anything like this????? I was given an autonomic test, the "results" were normal, but when I had to do the blowing section, it triggered an episode. My symptoms and bp were strong enough that the technician had to get a doctor to make sure it was ok to conitnue, but the "test results" were normal. Any thoughts? Anyone have this and have an answer on how to help? The blood pressure medications do not work.

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Welcome to Connect, @jecjr. You may notice that I moved your message to this existing discussion on blood pressure and hypertension as I thought it would be beneficial for you to be introduced to the many members who have discussed much about hypertension.
If you click on VIEW & REPLY in your email notification, you will see the whole discussion and can join in, meet, and participate with other members talking about their or their loved ones' experiences.

Let me introduce you to a few members here who've been talking Carvedilol and/or are dealing with hypertension. Please meet @predictable, @contender1 @clark711 @martishka @nadine66 @teatime @lugal @jacko @lacey @katherine_gauthier @terryzx @neeci @PatMattos @strmalik @clariseb.

Coreg (Carvedilol) is a beta blocker, used alone or together with other medicines to also treat high blood pressure (hypertension). High blood pressure adds to the workload of the heart and artery, and can increase the risk of heart attack. This may be less likely to occur if blood pressure is controlled. Here’s more information from Mayo Clinic: http://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements/carvedilol-oral-route/description/drg-20067565

Here's an incredibly informative discussion about Carvedilol that you might wish to view: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/hi-everyone-i-am-glad-to-be-a-part-of-this-community/

@jecjr, we'd really like to get to know you better – were you just diagnosed with hypertension? Besides medication, are you following any other therapy to manage your hypertension?

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@colleenyoung

Welcome to Connect, Kathy. Let me introduce you to a few members here dealing with hypertension. Please meet @predictable, @contender1 @mikefox909 @martishka @nadine66 and @teatime.

@llecrup how are currently managing your hypertension? We look forward to getting to know a bit more about you.

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Hello @kgrealish, and welcome to Connect,

I can imagine how worried you must be! I'd like to connect you with a few members who've written about the Valsalva maneuver, which is the 'blowing section' of the autonomic test. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valsalva_maneuver.
Please meet @caddo21 @jimana @maysa; fellow member @dash99999 has also talked about very similar symptoms, and normal test results in this discussion:
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/male-23-possible-autoimmune-issues-difficult-to-diagnose/

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I get hives and red rashes from all blood pressure medicines please help. The doctors don't know why. I have been to many doctors

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Welcome to Connect, @msreyt9684

This must be quite stressful for you! I moved your post and combined it with this existing discussion on blood pressure as I thought it would be beneficial for you to connect with the many members who have shared their experiences with regard to blood pressure and medications.
If you click on VIEW & REPLY in your email notification, you will see the whole discussion and can join in, meet, and participate with other members talking about their or their loved ones' experiences.

Here's some information about hives, https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hives-and-angioedema/symptoms-causes/syc-20354908
which also lists blood pressure meds. as a cause.

I’d like to introduce you to a few other members to seek their insights about allergic reactions to blood pressure medications. Please meet @myra @bergordon @krj1213 @michelep1964 @l8dybug5 @teatime @murryone @neeci @momma78 @constanceann, and our Mentors, @hopeful33250 and @predictable.

You may also be interested in reading this discussions:
– Stopping Carvedilol (Coreg): When will the effects wear off? http://mayocl.in/28YeSeN
– Side effects of heart medicine carvedilol joint pain and stiffness, http://mayocl.in/2nTvsB6

@msreyt9684, would you share some more details about your health? Are you on any other medications? How do you manage the hives and rash?

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@msreyt9684

I get hives and red rashes from all blood pressure medicines please help. The doctors don't know why. I have been to many doctors

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Hello @msreyt9684, I'd like to add my welcome to you as you are a new member of Connect. This is a good place to find support and encouragement!

I take a couple of blood pressure meds and have never had any rashes from them. Have you talked with your pharmacist to see if this is a typical reaction to the blood pressure meds you are taking? If you haven't done so, I would encourage you to visit the pharmacist in person or by phone and ask that question. Also, calling your doctor might be helpful.

In thinking about the rash, did it occur right after you added a new medicine?

Sometimes it takes a little detective work to figure out a new rash, often it can even be as simple as a change of laundry detergent or soap that you might use.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Teresa

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@msreyt9684

I get hives and red rashes from all blood pressure medicines please help. The doctors don't know why. I have been to many doctors

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@msreyt9684 – I have a different problem with blood pressure medications – my throat will feel like it is going to close down. I will take a Benedryl and then have to go to another medication. I have found that it is the inactive ingredients in the medicines. I take Atenolol and can only take the generic made by Teva. My insurance just told me they will not pay for the name brand Diovan any longer. I had tried the generic Mylan and could not take it because of the throat closure. My husband found the list of inactive ingredients online for the different generics and we found Solco should work. I have taken it for a week and it appears to be working and no throat closure. We both are having allergic reactions but in a different form. Good Luck – a difficult allergy to have.

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