Anyone with KRAS nsclc, and/or specifically KRAS G12D? Treatment?

Posted by carlies @carlies, Nov 25, 2021

Treatment info would be helpful. Thank you.

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Lung Cancer group.

@carlies, as you already know KRAS G12D is fairly rare. KRAS is altered in 29.61% of non-small cell lung carcinoma patients. G12C, G12D and G12R are some of the most common KRAS mutations, based on the specific mutations that are present. KRAS G12D is present in 4.26% of all non-small cell lung carcinoma patients.

Unfortunately, KRAS mutations have long been considered impossible to treat with drugs, but researchers have made recent breakthroughs in developing targeted therapies with promising results in some tumor types. For example, for people with KRAS mutation G12C, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted accelerated approval to the first KRAS-blocking drug, called sotorasib (Lumakras). Under the new approval, sotorasib can be used to treat people with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that has spread nearby (locally advanced) or to distant locations (metastatic) in the body. Patients must have previously received at least one other systemic cancer treatment, such as chemotherapy, and have a particular KRAS mutation, known as G12C, in their tumors.
– FDA Approval of KRAS Inhibitor Sotorasib for Lung Cancer Hailed as Milestone https://www.cancer.gov/news-events/cancer-currents-blog/2021/fda-sotorasib-lung-cancer-kras

This clinical trial results are currently under review.
– A Phase 2 Trial of Bortezomib in KRAS-Mutant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in Never Smokers or Those With KRAS G12D.: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01833143

You might ask your oncologist if they know more about the preliminary results and if a phase 3 trial is being planned. Have you talked to your oncologist about possible clinical trials that you may be eligible for?

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@colleenyoung

@carlies, as you already know KRAS G12D is fairly rare. KRAS is altered in 29.61% of non-small cell lung carcinoma patients. G12C, G12D and G12R are some of the most common KRAS mutations, based on the specific mutations that are present. KRAS G12D is present in 4.26% of all non-small cell lung carcinoma patients.

Unfortunately, KRAS mutations have long been considered impossible to treat with drugs, but researchers have made recent breakthroughs in developing targeted therapies with promising results in some tumor types. For example, for people with KRAS mutation G12C, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted accelerated approval to the first KRAS-blocking drug, called sotorasib (Lumakras). Under the new approval, sotorasib can be used to treat people with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that has spread nearby (locally advanced) or to distant locations (metastatic) in the body. Patients must have previously received at least one other systemic cancer treatment, such as chemotherapy, and have a particular KRAS mutation, known as G12C, in their tumors.
– FDA Approval of KRAS Inhibitor Sotorasib for Lung Cancer Hailed as Milestone https://www.cancer.gov/news-events/cancer-currents-blog/2021/fda-sotorasib-lung-cancer-kras

This clinical trial results are currently under review.
– A Phase 2 Trial of Bortezomib in KRAS-Mutant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in Never Smokers or Those With KRAS G12D.: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01833143

You might ask your oncologist if they know more about the preliminary results and if a phase 3 trial is being planned. Have you talked to your oncologist about possible clinical trials that you may be eligible for?

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Hi Collleen, yes, we’ve talked about clinical trials. I don’t think the trial you’ve mentioned has been brought up? I will check the study for myself. We go to Mayo tomorrow. I will be sure to mention what you have shared! There is also a trial I found that reference KRAS G12G, however, it’s not available to Mayo. When I mentioned it to one of the onco’s he said he wasn’t sure if one of the exclusions would make this ineligible or not? I will be bringing this up tomorrow as well…asking them to please inquire! ‘No assumptions’ – if you know what I mean? Thanks again, Colleen ❤️.

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@carlies

Hi Collleen, yes, we’ve talked about clinical trials. I don’t think the trial you’ve mentioned has been brought up? I will check the study for myself. We go to Mayo tomorrow. I will be sure to mention what you have shared! There is also a trial I found that reference KRAS G12G, however, it’s not available to Mayo. When I mentioned it to one of the onco’s he said he wasn’t sure if one of the exclusions would make this ineligible or not? I will be bringing this up tomorrow as well…asking them to please inquire! ‘No assumptions’ – if you know what I mean? Thanks again, Colleen ❤️.

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Hope your appointment went well. I look forward to an update.

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Hi Colleen. I looked up the Bortezomib trial and found that I had actually reviewed that information a couple weeks ago. The information I read indicated it went through phase 2, but then stopped. I asked the onoco about it. He said he didn't think that drug was anything that showed impressive results. He also said if a trial istopped, it's unlikely to resume~.

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@carlies

Hi Colleen. I looked up the Bortezomib trial and found that I had actually reviewed that information a couple weeks ago. The information I read indicated it went through phase 2, but then stopped. I asked the onoco about it. He said he didn't think that drug was anything that showed impressive results. He also said if a trial istopped, it's unlikely to resume~.

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Darn. I was afraid that the trial may have been discontinued due to poor results.

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@colleenyoung

Darn. I was afraid that the trial may have been discontinued due to poor results.

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Actually, as I’ve been searching, I’ve run across it again – with posted results?! However, the results were not good… I appreciate the pointer :).

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