Anyone Tried Cognitive Behavioral Therapy?

Posted by suzbyrne @suzbyrne, Sep 26 7:27am

I’m thinking about going back to therapy. Does anyone have experience with CBT? Any information would be most appreciated. 😊

I’ve not tried that. All I’ve done is go to my, now retired therapist.

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@suzbyrne Here is a link to what Mayo Clinic offers as information about CBT, which may help you understand what it is about: https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/cognitive-behavioral-therapy/about/pac-20384610

In a thread here on Mayo Clinic Connect, posted by our moderator @colleenyoung this past July, she gave a link to a website you might find interesting https://positivepsychology.com/cbt-cognitive-behavioral-therapy-techniques-worksheets/

Looking back at therapy I have had, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy seems to be part of the work I did with professionals, while also doing it on my own. For me, distinguishing exact names of type of help is confusing. "Whatever works" is more my motto, as labels are something I don't do well. Anytime we make the choice to start working on ourselves, be prepared for the unexpected, for things to present themselves you never thought about, or had hidden away in a corner of your mind for a long long time. Be prepared for it to take awhile, not overnight. Keep a journal to write things out, decompress, and clear out of your mind. And don't forget, be proud of yourself for making a choice to work on yourself, and feel better, whatever that is for you!
Ginger

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@gingerw

@suzbyrne Here is a link to what Mayo Clinic offers as information about CBT, which may help you understand what it is about: https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/cognitive-behavioral-therapy/about/pac-20384610

In a thread here on Mayo Clinic Connect, posted by our moderator @colleenyoung this past July, she gave a link to a website you might find interesting https://positivepsychology.com/cbt-cognitive-behavioral-therapy-techniques-worksheets/

Looking back at therapy I have had, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy seems to be part of the work I did with professionals, while also doing it on my own. For me, distinguishing exact names of type of help is confusing. "Whatever works" is more my motto, as labels are something I don't do well. Anytime we make the choice to start working on ourselves, be prepared for the unexpected, for things to present themselves you never thought about, or had hidden away in a corner of your mind for a long long time. Be prepared for it to take awhile, not overnight. Keep a journal to write things out, decompress, and clear out of your mind. And don't forget, be proud of yourself for making a choice to work on yourself, and feel better, whatever that is for you!
Ginger

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Thank you, Ginger! I will definitely take a look and let you know how it goes.

The process of writing things out is so helpful. I felt kind of bad when I responded to someone and started out empathetic, but I wound up writing about something from my childhood I've never said out loud. Wow. I started with her and ended with me, and that made me feel like I'd done a bait and switch. Am I overthinking? I'm probably not the only perseverator (or was I really just selfish?) I'm only half kidding.

Thanks again. Will follow up. Suzanne

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@suzbyrne

Thank you, Ginger! I will definitely take a look and let you know how it goes.

The process of writing things out is so helpful. I felt kind of bad when I responded to someone and started out empathetic, but I wound up writing about something from my childhood I've never said out loud. Wow. I started with her and ended with me, and that made me feel like I'd done a bait and switch. Am I overthinking? I'm probably not the only perseverator (or was I really just selfish?) I'm only half kidding.

Thanks again. Will follow up. Suzanne

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@suzbyrne Suzanne, often times we are listening to someone, of doing the speaking ourselves. And suddenly the tables turn. Something was triggered inside our minds. My husband often does that, as i talk to him about something I find important to say, and he flashes on his childhood or such.At first I would get upset, because to me, that meant my words were just hanging out there, and he wasn't responding to my concern. Eventually, I learned to listen closely, and find out more about what "makes him tick". You never know what will trigger us or the other person to have an insight!
Ginger

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Hello @gingerw @suzbyrne and @marionwilhelm

I've been reading this discussion thread and found it so interesting and enlightening. You've all made some great comments, especially about how CBT and how sharing experiences can trigger others to talk about their experiences. Earlier in my life when I was trying to get "fixed" from my depression and anxiety my therapist suggested David Burns Workbook on Cognitive Behavior Therapy which was so helpful to me as I read and journaled the exercises. Because it is cognitive therapy it helps find a logical way to think less neurotic and I really valued that approach.

As you discussed in your posts about how sharing triggers thoughts for others I thought also about my attendance in ACA meetings early on. ACA stands for Adult Children of Alcoholics/ Dysfunctional Families Anonymous. It was for adults who had grown up in an alcoholic or other dysfunctional family (such as families with mental illness, addiction, etc.). As the name implies, it is, of course, a 12-Step Group, and the great value of these groups was that as people talked about their childhood and their current problems, it would often trigger memories for others in the group. That's why the sharing of these experiences holds such value. Here is a way you can find ACA groups in your area, https://adultchildren.org/.

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@hopeful33250 Thanks for bringing that up. I did go to ACA meetings and I found it very helpful. It was also triggering. I experienced rage for the first time. I beat up a pillow. But I also hit my husband. He wasn't an alcoholic, but he pushed my trigger. I don't think I could have benefited much because I was buried under so many layers of hurt: neglect, emotional abuse, physical abuse. The ACA did wake me up a bit and I'm grateful for that. I've (thankfully) reached the age when I can look back and see patterns and make decisions based on not repeating mistakes I've made in the past. I've also cut ties with people that kept me buried. Just like an alcoholic needs to have friends who don't drink, I needed to relate to family that sees me as a whole person who actually knows something.

And I thank this group for all the good it does. I love to write and, for me, it's how I think best. And learn more. 🙂

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Hello @suzbyrne

You've undoubtedly worked hard at recovering from your past abuse. Congratulations on all that work. I understand how difficult it can be to dredge up those "layers.".

I'm glad that you enjoy writing. Keep posting!

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Please, can anyone recommend any CBT cognitive behavioral therapy self help books? Something that's not a million pages long and is written in plain English?

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@johneckenrode11

Please, can anyone recommend any CBT cognitive behavioral therapy self help books? Something that's not a million pages long and is written in plain English?

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Hi @johneckenrode11

I've used David Burns workbook which was quite helpful for me. Here is a link to his website, http://www.feelinggood.com.

There are probably other good books and resources if you search for them.

Are you thinking about using CBT?

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@hopeful33250

Hi @johneckenrode11

I've used David Burns workbook which was quite helpful for me. Here is a link to his website, http://www.feelinggood.com.

There are probably other good books and resources if you search for them.

Are you thinking about using CBT?

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Thanks, good ideas, and yes I'm thinking of trying / using CBT!

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@johneckenrode11

Thanks, good ideas, and yes I'm thinking of trying / using CBT!

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Your welcome, @johneckenrode11.

If you are comfortable sharing more, what symptoms are you trying to resolve with CBT?

If you do try it, I would enjoy hearing from you again with your thoughts on how it worked for you.

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@johneckenrode11

Please, can anyone recommend any CBT cognitive behavioral therapy self help books? Something that's not a million pages long and is written in plain English?

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I'm doing cognitive behavioral therapy now. Its premise is to provide you with the tools to move forward and solve your issues. Proven in the literature. Its been excellent!

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