After her Stroke my mom does not want to eat pushes her food way.

Posted by jules17 @jules17, Mar 1, 2019

My 83 year old mom who was in good health before her stroke 6 weeks ago... Mom always had a great Appetite and a healthy diet. She has recently passed the swallowing test but refuses to eat, she pushes her food away. Anyone have any ideas on how we can try to help or want to eat?

We have tried the change of scenery different ideas... she did have a lot of problems with her tummy and the liquid meds that they had to give her through the stomach tube could that be discouraging her thinking that eating has consequences of a bad tummyache ?
Thank you
Julia

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@bunkie

So glad to have found this thread. I am 52 years old, had a mini-stroke on December 30th. Since then, my sense of taste has been off, and I can't eat most foods, they feel uncomfortably dry in my mouth, and I'm never hungry. I am basically living on soup. I am morbidly obese, weighing around 285 when I had my stroke, down to 245 now. My doctor is stumped, my stroke doctor wants me to follow-up with a gastroenterologist. My stomach feels fine, but I am never hungry. My mouth sometimes feels kind of nauseous, I eat because I have to, not because I want to. It's very frustrating and I wish so badly I could eat normally.

Sue

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Sue, when I had a stroke five years ago, I didn't want to eat anything for months.

When I did eat, I would often bite my upper lip so hard I'd draw blood. That didn't help.

I lost about 40 pounds over the first six months.

Slowly (over years), I regained an appetite, but I had really strange cravings. For example, for a while I couldn't get enough canned peaches in extra-light syrup! Seriously, I ate dozens of cans. Then I wanted salads and nothing else. And foods I had enjoyed, like Mexican, seemed nauseating.

Anyway, over the years, I'm sort-of back to normal. (Regained most of the weight, too, dammit!)

Traumatic brain injuries do weird things to you. I, and most other stroke patients I've talked to, were so terrified after the event that *everything* was out of whack for an extended period of time.

Give it time. You'll be okay, I bet.

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I have a mixed basket of issues going on. So, my father-in-law had brain surgery at Keck hospital in Los Angeles on 03/29/24, during the surgery he had a stroke. His primary care unfortunately is with Kaiser. He's been home for approximately 2 weeks and is a diabetic on a puree diet due to swallowing issues. He went from being a vibrant 74 year old who ran everyday, rode his bicycle for 20+ miles and more....to being an adult with a bratty childlike behavior. He is currently in a diaper in a hospital bed at home. My husband and mother-in-law have to do everything from cleaning him up to checking his blood sugar, feeding him 0-2 tsps of food, and has to beg him to sip a little water....after a few sips, he is done. They also have to suction him, and brush his teeth. Sometimes he even fights them on taking his meds. He isn't talking, just a little whisper here and there. When they pack him up to take him to appointments, it's like packing an infant or toddler bag. His wheelchair is heavy and although he's never been overweight, he's heavy because he has no balance, but his right side has feeling but he cannot move the parts. The first 2 weeks my husband had to stay with his parents to get a routine in place to end the night. He recently has been able to come home because his dad has been sleeping through the night. It's so disheartening that he has not had any PT, OT or Speech since leaving rehab. He was at rehab for about 4 weeks. My husband has been buying gadgets to assist his dad with sometime of therapy. We don't know what we are doing. His mom is willing to pay out of pocket for whatever but everything as far as referrals are in limbo. There should not be any dead time!!! We treat the incarcerated better than retired and working law abiding citizens. I know, I worked in the system for years. (Venting) We are not the United States of America, we are just states in America. Some states do more and care more and in some states like Califonia it's the polar opposite. I don't know, we just need help....(tears flowing)!

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