Temporary causes of urinary incontinence

Nov 19, 2021 | Marie Suszynski, Writer | @mariemayohecs | Comments (5)

 

 

There are a number of factors that can produce temporary incontinence. Certain foods, beverages or medications can result in incontinence. Temporary incontinence may also be related to an infection or another medical condition that’s easily treatable.

  • Too much fluid — A basic, common cause of incontinence is drinking a lot of fluids, especially in a short period of time. It’s generally recommended that most adults consume approximately 60 ounces of fluids each day. Eight 8-ounce glasses equals 64 ounces. That’s easy to remember and a close enough goal.
  • Alcohol and caffeine — Alcohol and caffeine are diuretics and stimulants. They cause your bladder to produce more urine. As a result, your bladder fills up more quickly than usual and you may experience an urgent, sometimes uncontrollable, need to urinate. Alcohol and caffeine also can irritate the bladder lining, which can lead to incontinence in people with sensitive bladders.
  • Irritating foods and beverages — Among some individuals, carbonated drinks, fruit and fruit juices can irritate the bladder and may cause episodes of urinary incontinence. Spicy foods, tomato-based products, and foods and beverages containing artificial sweeteners are other common culprits.
  • Medications —Some high blood pressure and heart medications can relax bladder muscles, allowing urine to flow more easily and sometimes leak. Other medications — including diuretics — can trigger or worsen incontinence by causing you to make more urine. Antidepressants and sedatives may worsen incontinence by decreasing your awareness of the need to go to the bathroom. Some antidepressants and cold medications may also keep your bladder from emptying completely.
  • Being overweight — In general, the more you weigh, the more likely you are to experience urinary incontinence. Being significantly overweight puts constant, increased pressure on your bladder and its surrounding muscles, structures and nerves, weakening them and allowing urine to leak out when you cough, sneeze or lift something heavy (stress incontinence). Losing just 5% to 10% of your body weight may significantly reduce pressure within the abdomen that results in added stress on the bladder.
  • Poor physical fitness — People who are physically fit tend to have strong pelvic floor muscles. When you’re not as fit as you should be, your pelvic floor muscles may be weakened, which may contribute to urinary incontinence.
  • Urinary tract infection —Urinary tract infections typically occur when bacteria from outside the body enter the urinary tract through the urethra and begin to multiply in the bladder. The resulting infection irritates the bladder, causing you to experience strong urges to urinate.

 

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Learn more strategies and tips on how to improve bladder and bowel control with Mayo Clinic on Incontinence.

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Add to that list, chemo and radiation to the abdomen. Radiation has atrophied and already small bladder. Spasms of the bladder from chemo damage to nerves. All these on top of an already touchy bladder and you have big urinary problems. Adult disposable underwear is a necessity not a luxury.

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@ejrdevries

Add to that list, chemo and radiation to the abdomen. Radiation has atrophied and already small bladder. Spasms of the bladder from chemo damage to nerves. All these on top of an already touchy bladder and you have big urinary problems. Adult disposable underwear is a necessity not a luxury.

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Absolutely

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@ejrdevries

Add to that list, chemo and radiation to the abdomen. Radiation has atrophied and already small bladder. Spasms of the bladder from chemo damage to nerves. All these on top of an already touchy bladder and you have big urinary problems. Adult disposable underwear is a necessity not a luxury.

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Good addition, @ejrdevries. Cancer treatments can also affect the bladder and urinary issues for many types of cancers, most notably gynecological cancers, prostate cancer and, of course, bladder cancer.

@ellieru, have you had cancer treatments too?

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@colleenyoung

Good addition, @ejrdevries. Cancer treatments can also affect the bladder and urinary issues for many types of cancers, most notably gynecological cancers, prostate cancer and, of course, bladder cancer.

@ellieru, have you had cancer treatments too?

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Yes. 20-21. Chemo and radiation. Tumor in bladder wall.

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@ellieru

Yes. 20-21. Chemo and radiation. Tumor in bladder wall.

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Thanks, Ellie. I invite you to join the bladder cancer discussions here in these Cancer groups. I'm confident that your experiences would benefit other members, especially those who are newly diagnosed, are scared and who have questions from people like you who have been there.

– Cancer group https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/cancer/
– Cancer: Managing Symptoms https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/cancer-managing-symptoms/

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