Tackling the latest COVID-19 topics

Feb 17 8:00am | Jennifer O'Hara | @jenohara | Comments (14)

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Medical research reveals new information about COVID-19 daily. While scientists and medical experts focus on virus spread, new variants, improved therapeutic treatments and more, it's sometimes difficult for the public to keep up with evolving information.

In this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group, helps by answering a number of common questions and addressing these COVID-19 topics:

  • Antibody tests after having a COVID-19 vaccine.
  • Monoclonal antibodies.
  • COVID-19 variants.
  • Side effects, especially after the second dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.
  • Vaccinating children and attending school in person.
  • Whether COVID-19 vaccines an be interchanged.
  • Mask-wearing recommendations.
  • Appearance of long-hauler symptoms are more often in women.
  • Pregnant, breastfeeding mothers and the COVID-19 vaccines.

To practice safe social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic, this interview was conducted using video conferencing. The sound and video quality are representative of the technology used. For the safety of its patients, staff and visitors, Mayo Clinic has strict masking policies in place. Anyone shown without a mask was recorded prior to COVID-19 or recorded in an area not designated for patient care, where social distancing and other safety protocols were followed.

See full transcript.

Connect with others talking about the pandemic and supporting one another in the COVID-19 support group.

Information in this post was accurate at the time of its posting. Due to the fluid nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, scientific understanding, along with guidelines and recommendations, may have changed since the original publication date.

For more information and all your COVID-19 coverage, go to the Mayo Clinic News Network and mayoclinic.org.

Dr. Poland has served as a consultant for Merck & Co. Inc., Medicago Inc., GlaxoSmithKline plc, Sanofi Pasteur, Emergent BioSolutions Inc., Dynavax Technologies Corp., Genentech Inc., Eli Lilly and Co., Kentucky BioProcessing Inc. and Genevant Sciences Corp., and Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc. He is a paid scientific adviser for Johnson & Johnson. Honoraria: Elsevier.

 

Jan, I heard that you are conflicted with whether or not to take the second
dose. I listen to these weekly podcasts from Mayo. This one may help some
of your wonderments, or perhaps not. Scroll down to the Utube.com and
click on it to listen.
I know you have a decision to make for yourself. If you should decide not
to take the second one, I would only encourage you to think about
contacting your Dr first, and second to let the clinic know in advance if
you aren’t interested. That way they can call up someone else to get your
dose and it doesn’t get wasted.

I love you, friend
Judy

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when the drug makers made it clear that the vaccine is not safe you can read this and make your own mind up but the doctors are pushing it Norway where I keep in contact with have stop giving these shots because the death rate was 100 % and Sweden where I got a cuz that lives there they to stop giving out the shots here is the website to one of the makers of the shot not good what they said Severe Allergic Reactions Reported After Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccinations – The Vaccine Reaction just copy and past it into your browser

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@stolzy Some clarifications: 1. Covid vaccines were developed in a rush, and allowed to be used despite not having completed all the usual procedures because we ARE in an emergency. Thus, we have obtained vaccines within around one year, when it would have required several years. Therefore, safety concerns are greater than normal, but deemed acceptable when compared with the alternative, if you understand what I mean. 2. In Norway 23 elderly people died after receiving the second dose of the Pfizer vaccine. The Government is investigating the circumstances, and you can read an update here (https://www.fhi.no/en/news/2021/international-interest-about-deaths-following-coronavirus-vaccination/) as well as in reputable news outlets. To date, 343,128 doses have been administered in Norway (https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/covid-vaccine-tracker-global-distribution/#global), and I haven't heard that all of those people died, so I don't know where you got that "… the death rate was 100%…". In Norway, 5% of the population got at least one shot. 3. I don't have "a cuz" in Sweden, so I searched elsewhere but couldn't find news about vaccination being stopped. In the same source shown before for Norway, you can see that 553,243 doses have been administered so far, amounting to 3.7% of the population receiving at least one shot.

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@jenohara Jennifer, how can I send questions to Dr. Poland? Thanks, Armando

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This article explains
– How did we develop a COVID-19 vaccine so quickly? https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/how-did-we-develop-a-covid-19-vaccine-so-quickly
With vaccine approvals underway, Medical News Today spoke with medical experts about how coronavirus vaccines were rapidly made without compromising safety.

Safety was not compromised in the development of the vaccine. Experts are watching side effects and long term efficacy closely.

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@bolso1

@jenohara Jennifer, how can I send questions to Dr. Poland? Thanks, Armando

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@bolso1, Armando, you can submit your question to Dr. Poland here for consideration in the upcoming podcast.

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Question to Dr. Poland:
In your podcasts (very clear and useful, by the way) you have explained that after being fully vaccinated we should continue to wear masks because — among other reasons — we can still transmit the virus, behaving much the same way asymptomatic carriers do?

I would appreciate if you could explain the way that such a transmission could happen.

To put my question in context: Today, in "The Morning" newsletter published by the New York Times, in an article about the so-called vaccine alarmism entitled "A vaccine shot? No thank you", it is stated that : …The initial research trials of the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines did not study whether a vaccinated person could get infected and infect another person. But the accumulated scientific evidence suggests the chances are very small that a vaccinated person could infect someone else with a severe case of Covid. (A mild case is effectively the common cold.) You wouldn’t know that from much of the public discussion.
“Over and over again, I see statements that in theory one could be infected and spread the virus even after being fully vaccinated,” Dr. Rebecca Wurtz of the University of Minnesota told me. “Is the ambiguous messaging contributing to ambivalent feelings about vaccination? Yes, no question.”

I think that it's important to address these issues, because there seems to be an ambivalent attitude (one needs to be vaccinated to be protected but still we need to keep our precautions because we can still get sick) that is confusing vast sectors of the population who cannot fully grasp the scientific reasons behind it, and who therefore resort to boycotting the vaccines.

Thank you and regards,

Armando

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Does anyone know about taking ibuprofen for 103 fever from second vaccine? So confused.

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@bolso1

@jenohara Jennifer, how can I send questions to Dr. Poland? Thanks, Armando

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Dr. Poland,
Why is their a one week difference between receiving the second shot of the Pfizer and the Moderna vaccine? After the first Pfizer shot, one can receive the second Pfizer vaccine in three weeks and the Moderna one, four weeks after the first. Is their a specific reason for this difference, since both vaccines supposedly are identical. It may be a mute point, however, I would be interested in hearing of your interpretation, if you have one. Thank you so much, and for your weekly videos on this subject. They are simply outstanding in every sense of the word.
Joseph Greco

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Hello @josephgreco and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. Thank you for your question to Dr. Poland for consideration in an upcoming podcast.

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@cavlover if you would like to connect with other member discussing the COVID vaccine, please feel free to join that group and relevant discussions.

COVID-19 Group: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/covid-19/

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@amandajro

Hello @josephgreco and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. Thank you for your question to Dr. Poland for consideration in an upcoming podcast.

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Question for Dr Poland:
Once someone has received the 2nd dose of vaccine, is there any concern
about giving blood. Also, does it in any way weaken the immunity we get
from the vaccine?
Thank you so much for the continued communication regarding CoVID.

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