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marysapp
@marysapp

Posts: 6
Joined: Mar 22, 2016

What type of implants does Mayo use for hip replacements?

Posted by @marysapp, Apr 24, 2016

What type of implants does Mayo use for hip replacements?

REPLY

Good question Mary. As this article from Mayo Clinic states implants are “…usually constructed of metal and very hard plastic..” http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/hip-replacement-surgery/basics/definition/prc-20019151

This article from the FDA goes into more details about five types of total hip replacement devices available in the US with different bearing surfaces. http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/ImplantsandProsthetics/MetalonMetalHipImplants/ucm241594.htm The material used is not institutional specific, but rather dependent on a number of patient factors that the surgeon and patient will carefully consider. “An orthopaedic surgeon should determine which hip implant will offer the most benefit and least risk for each patient. When making a recommendation, orthopaedic surgeons should consider several factors such as the patient’s age, weight, height, activity level, and cause of hip pain.”

@pamperthyself @chief917 @02121949 @coladyrev @annh @mfobrien36 what type of material are your hip implants made of? Any thoughts for @marysapp?

Mary: Are you considering a hip replacement? What pros and cons have you heard about the material choices?

Liked by marysapp

@aliskahan

Good question Mary. As this article from Mayo Clinic states implants are “…usually constructed of metal and very hard plastic..” http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/hip-replacement-surgery/basics/definition/prc-20019151

This article from the FDA goes into more details about five types of total hip replacement devices available in the US with different bearing surfaces. http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/ImplantsandProsthetics/MetalonMetalHipImplants/ucm241594.htm The material used is not institutional specific, but rather dependent on a number of patient factors that the surgeon and patient will carefully consider. “An orthopaedic surgeon should determine which hip implant will offer the most benefit and least risk for each patient. When making a recommendation, orthopaedic surgeons should consider several factors such as the patient’s age, weight, height, activity level, and cause of hip pain.”

@pamperthyself @chief917 @02121949 @coladyrev @annh @mfobrien36 what type of material are your hip implants made of? Any thoughts for @marysapp?

Mary: Are you considering a hip replacement? What pros and cons have you heard about the material choices?

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I have a titanium hip socket cemented into my bone.

As I understand it, the surgeon chose this one because of my age (74 and
osteopenic) and the bone deterioration from the socket being bone on bone.
Cementing in place means you can bear weight on the new joint immediately
(well, as much as you can tolerate); not cementing means the bone needs to
grow into the new socket and you can’t let the joint bear weight for about
6 weeks. The hospital I was at had a pre-op class for knee and hip
replacements where the nursing and PT staff told about the procedure, the
hospital stay, and the therapy all the docs at that particular place
require. Such a class is invaluable if you are offered it! I am pleased
with my new hip and am planning the replacement for the other hip at the
end of May.

@aliskahan

Good question Mary. As this article from Mayo Clinic states implants are “…usually constructed of metal and very hard plastic..” http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/hip-replacement-surgery/basics/definition/prc-20019151

This article from the FDA goes into more details about five types of total hip replacement devices available in the US with different bearing surfaces. http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/ImplantsandProsthetics/MetalonMetalHipImplants/ucm241594.htm The material used is not institutional specific, but rather dependent on a number of patient factors that the surgeon and patient will carefully consider. “An orthopaedic surgeon should determine which hip implant will offer the most benefit and least risk for each patient. When making a recommendation, orthopaedic surgeons should consider several factors such as the patient’s age, weight, height, activity level, and cause of hip pain.”

@pamperthyself @chief917 @02121949 @coladyrev @annh @mfobrien36 what type of material are your hip implants made of? Any thoughts for @marysapp?

Mary: Are you considering a hip replacement? What pros and cons have you heard about the material choices?

Jump to this post

Hi,
I am scheduled for what is called a revision. The lining between the ball and socket is to be replaced.
I understand the socket will also be replaced.
Is this a common procedure? I am having second thoughts regarding this procedure as lately I am thinking that my discomfort is muscular, as I have no sharp pain.
My hip (one of 2) is 24 years old and I am 78. (titanium, ceramic ball and plastic socket)
I have had x-rays and an MRI.
I am still playing pickle ball with no sharp pain. If I sit in my rocking chair I have little or no pain but I am not ready to do that yet.
Swimming is not a problem.
The thigh muscle has never returned to proper size. Example I can’t balance on this leg.
My other hip is fine. (metal on metal which I understand they don’t do now)

Thanks for the input.

CA

I’ve ni experience with the revision procedure of which you speak. I was
told by the PA with my surgeon that therapy pool 9warm water was excellent
exercise. I had a PT show me some appropriate exercises for my spine and
hips. Wish you well.

@aliskahan

Good question Mary. As this article from Mayo Clinic states implants are “…usually constructed of metal and very hard plastic..” http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/hip-replacement-surgery/basics/definition/prc-20019151

This article from the FDA goes into more details about five types of total hip replacement devices available in the US with different bearing surfaces. http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/ImplantsandProsthetics/MetalonMetalHipImplants/ucm241594.htm The material used is not institutional specific, but rather dependent on a number of patient factors that the surgeon and patient will carefully consider. “An orthopaedic surgeon should determine which hip implant will offer the most benefit and least risk for each patient. When making a recommendation, orthopaedic surgeons should consider several factors such as the patient’s age, weight, height, activity level, and cause of hip pain.”

@pamperthyself @chief917 @02121949 @coladyrev @annh @mfobrien36 what type of material are your hip implants made of? Any thoughts for @marysapp?

Mary: Are you considering a hip replacement? What pros and cons have you heard about the material choices?

Jump to this post

I have scheduled hip replacement surgery for June 2016. I am 53 and my problem is bone on bone. Do you think hip resurfacing is an option for me? If not, what type of implant is good for my age. I am 5’6″ and
150 lbs. female
Thank You.

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