Vitamin D (testing and supplements)

Posted by Sophie93 @sophie93, Oct 15 8:32am

I had my vitamin D levels tested at the end of the summer (immediately after coming back from a beach vacation): They were in the optimal range, so my doctor told me I don't need any supplements for now.

However, it is already mid-October and my sun exposure hasn't been that great. Even when I go out in the sun, I feel like it is not strong enough to make any impact.

When should I get my next vit-D lab test so I can see if I need to start supplementing?

Thank you

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It is best to test your levels around March, after winter. That is when you will see your lowest levels so you can make a better assessment on supplementation. If you find that you need to raise your levels you can determine how much to take as each dose of 1000 IU daily will raise your blood level by about 10.

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@teb

It is best to test your levels around March, after winter. That is when you will see your lowest levels so you can make a better assessment on supplementation. If you find that you need to raise your levels you can determine how much to take as each dose of 1000 IU daily will raise your blood level by about 10.

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Thank you for your reply! I understand that, since my levels were optimal at the end of summer, there are going to be some "reserves" that are going to get me through the fall and winter without me going deficient.

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@sophie93, you may find this article informative, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2912737/#:~:text=It%20has%20been%20suggested%20that,%2C%20chronic%20fatigue%2C%20age%2Drelated. It lays out in pretty good detail why so many people are vitamin D deficient, but also why most places don't routinely test and the difficulty of prescribing the correct supplement dose for each individual.

@sophie93, the article mentions that routine "vitamin D testing may benefit those at risk for severe deficiency (Table 2) or those with laboratory or radiographic findings commonly associated with vitamin D deficiency (Table 3)." If you are comfortable sharing, do you have some known issues with deficiency and other issues that may cause?

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@JustinMcClanahan

@sophie93, you may find this article informative, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2912737/#:~:text=It%20has%20been%20suggested%20that,%2C%20chronic%20fatigue%2C%20age%2Drelated. It lays out in pretty good detail why so many people are vitamin D deficient, but also why most places don't routinely test and the difficulty of prescribing the correct supplement dose for each individual.

@sophie93, the article mentions that routine "vitamin D testing may benefit those at risk for severe deficiency (Table 2) or those with laboratory or radiographic findings commonly associated with vitamin D deficiency (Table 3)." If you are comfortable sharing, do you have some known issues with deficiency and other issues that may cause?

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Hello!
Thank you for the informative and very useful article 🙂

My Vitamin D levels had been measured several times and I have never been deficient. In fact, my levels have always been in the higher end of normal, but still in the optimal range.

However, I was thinking that having osteoporosis on itself would be a risk factor for deficiency, hence one would need more frequent tests.

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Many do not treat if you are even ł-3 above the lowest range however my OB of all people will give me 50,000 for 12 weeks to get my level up. It bottoms out all the time around 21-22 and to be honest I feel my best when my level is like 45-50. If it gets low I get some chest pains, feel weak in my muscles and don't sleep like I should so it's definitely important. I also have lots of arthritis and it does actually help me with this as well. Definitely see where you feel your best because it's different for each of us.

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@sophie93

Hello!
Thank you for the informative and very useful article 🙂

My Vitamin D levels had been measured several times and I have never been deficient. In fact, my levels have always been in the higher end of normal, but still in the optimal range.

However, I was thinking that having osteoporosis on itself would be a risk factor for deficiency, hence one would need more frequent tests.

Jump to this post

That article is from 2010 and much more research ( an 10 year study) and other conclusions have been made. Do an internet search for latest info, from reputable sources, on D .

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