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cdbc
@cdbc

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Joined: Feb 14, 2017

Triglycerides

Posted by @cdbc, Feb 14, 2017

I think I may have an inherited type of extremely high triglyceride levels – usually about 699. My mother’s were extremely high. Do you have cookbooks/diet books for managing or possibly living free from high triglycerides like you do for diabetes? Any possibility that there would be a finger-prick test available or in the works for triglycerides like the glucose test for diabetics? I know my diet can lower levels in 2 weeks time, but it is an extreme balancing act.
Thank you.

REPLY

Welcome to Connect, @cdbc.
I encourage you start here with an article written by Mayo Clinic experts
– Triglycerides: Why do they matter? http://mayocl.in/1xVcGes

You may also be interested in joining this discussion:
– Want to control my cholesterol and triglycerides with food http://mayocl.in/2bfEmXR

I’m tagging @predictable @ihatediabetes and @minda77 on this discussion. I think they may have some thoughts on diet and managing diabetes and high triglycerides.

@cdbc, how long have you been managing diabetes?

One thing I’ve concluded is I can’t do this on my own and I don’t know medicine. I didn’t understand the numbers, what they meant, and what happens to you if you ignore the numbers. However, I’ve come to the conclusion the numbers matter because of what sugar and lipids do to your heart and other organs. I would get real doctor advice and not try to get everything from a book. I also think if you have high lipids that you should see a cardiologist. He or she will be able to check you for arteriosclerotic heart disease. That’s a biggie. I also get my a1c checked regularly and I have an agreement with endocrinologist that I can skip diabetes meds if I stick to my diet and exercise program. Try to be in agreement with your doctor about meds and exercise and food. Keep your word and follow doctor advise. If you don’t agree try to figure out temporary agreements like please let me exercise and diet for six months and then recheck. If you do this your doctor will work with you more because you got some credibility in the bank. So that’s all I have to say at this time. Cardiologist, a1c, and work with your doctor. Chronic conditions are chronic. So you have to come back again and again. Avoid complications as much as possible. You get to stay out of hospital and you don’t get hit with big bills.

There are several books on the market specifically for lowering triglycerides, but if you are looking for a cookbook, I would suggest something more global following either the Mediterranean diet or a Heart Healthy diet. And I agree with @ihatediabetes – be sure to work with your doctor as you make changes to exercise, diet and medications/dietary supplements. At this time, I am unaware of a home testing option for triglycerides.

@colleenyoung

Welcome to Connect, @cdbc.
I encourage you start here with an article written by Mayo Clinic experts
– Triglycerides: Why do they matter? http://mayocl.in/1xVcGes

You may also be interested in joining this discussion:
– Want to control my cholesterol and triglycerides with food http://mayocl.in/2bfEmXR

I’m tagging @predictable @ihatediabetes and @minda77 on this discussion. I think they may have some thoughts on diet and managing diabetes and high triglycerides.

@cdbc, how long have you been managing diabetes?

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I am insulin resistant and take Metformin. My A!C is always under 5 for the semi- annual blood work. My overall cholesterol has always been under 180, but the good is low and the bad is high. My husband is type 2 diabetic.
My mother had a massive heart attack at age 61 and lived to age 71. Her triglycerides and sugar levels were very high. We changed our diet 2 years ago – adding more fruit and vegetables. I’v always used whole grains – since 22 years old, now I’m 63. I don’t eat much bread, but have found myself indulging in sweets this past holiday season. I’m determined to eliminate most sugar from our diets. But I know whole wheat pasta, brown rice, and wheat bread ( I recently switched to Rye bread ) still turn to sugar, though not as fast as white products. I’ve incorporated a lot of Mayo Clinic’s guidelines for reducing Triglycerides – it just seems so hard. Some websites I’ve looked at say to eliminate all sugar including honey and fruit as well as breads and pasta. That seems so hard. I’m a Mamaw and my little guys love to bake with me. I love pork of all kinds, but have rarely indulged over my life, am using small amounts of lean sirloin, chicken and turkey. I love fish, but my husband can’t stand the smell, so I rarely eat it. It just sounds like I should only eat vegetables. I can walk and do stretching exercises, but lifting weights and strenuous exercise are not possible due to a history of RA and a severe injury from a fall.
Many diabetic diets still seam to incorporate the whole grains, etc. but seem to be taboo to lower and maintain low triglycerides. Thank you for the above links and your response. I will check them out.

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