Total knee replacement infection after 9 years.

Posted by rguribe @rguribe, Oct 2, 2019

I recently had an infection on my total knee replacement, they went in and clean the infected area. I was on 6 weeks of Vancomycin antibiotics through a PICC line, and afterwards, the doctor stated that I would have to be on a low dose of antibiotics (Doxycycline 100mg) for the rest of my life, that it was the new recommendation from the AMA. I have not been able to find that info in the AMA website and my concern is the side effects of taking antibiotics for the rest of my life. Has anybody gone thru a similar infection and is presently on antibiotic for the rest of their life? Thank you

Hello @jlflynn123 and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I am so sorry to read about the difficulties your husband has had with his surgery and recovery.

Where are things at with his knee and his pain now?

REPLY

I have had both hips totally replaced and following metallosis and pseudotumors in each because of metal on metal implants they have both been revised. I developed a bump on my hip that eventually came to a head and started draining some fluid. It was very gross looked to be an abscess or a cyst. I was treated by my primary doc but the bump returned and was red and uglier. I then went to a surgeon at my primary's advice to try to remove the capsule that he thought contained this fluid (like Dr. Pimple Popper). The surgeon's PA suggested I go see my hip doc. I was fortunate to get in to see him the next day however he was very displeased that I had not seen him immediately. After a stat MRI it looks like inflammation and infection which will require a lot of work and probably two uncomfortable surgeries. So for those of you worried about taking an antibiotic for your dental appointments, be safe rather than sorry.

REPLY

Gosh. So sorry to hear – must be so very disappointing and painful. I wish you success with the new procedures.
Question: in your opinion, did you have a good surgeon? a good hospital? I have had 2 TKRs 2015 and 2018 and so far all is well and I play racquet sport so far with no real trouble. One surgeon said take antibiotics for LIFE the other said just 2 years. I plan to be a LIFEer. And I always seem to have a lot of dental procedures. Do you think age contributes to your situation? I am 78. In general, I dislike basing things on age, but it is an important factor. Not only is there age bias in the general population, but I also wonder if Doctors are affected by it?

REPLY
@tennisgolf

Gosh. So sorry to hear – must be so very disappointing and painful. I wish you success with the new procedures.
Question: in your opinion, did you have a good surgeon? a good hospital? I have had 2 TKRs 2015 and 2018 and so far all is well and I play racquet sport so far with no real trouble. One surgeon said take antibiotics for LIFE the other said just 2 years. I plan to be a LIFEer. And I always seem to have a lot of dental procedures. Do you think age contributes to your situation? I am 78. In general, I dislike basing things on age, but it is an important factor. Not only is there age bias in the general population, but I also wonder if Doctors are affected by it?

Jump to this post

I have a great doctor and great hospital as far as I can tell and as far as reputation goes. The one issue that I had was that both of my original hip replacements were metal on metal which eventually deteriorated. The revision surgeries were relatively easy comparatively. This infection came from nowhere that I can tell, however, the original hip issues may have come from my workout schedule when I was younger. I was a Stairmaster fanatic and a competitive racquetball player. Football in high school. I play golf weekly or more if possible. I do not think age is a factor. This infection showed it's face right after a march in Washington DC where I was pulling people hanging on to my jacket to get through the large crowds. I may have twisted or pulled a muscle or strained something that may have been a vulnerable part of my implant.

REPLY
@amandajro

Hello @jlflynn123 and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I am so sorry to read about the difficulties your husband has had with his surgery and recovery.

Where are things at with his knee and his pain now?

Jump to this post

Hello, thanks for sharing your experience. My husband is facing revision surgery since his levels of cobalt and chromium continue to trend upward. He has pervasive joint pains and brain fog which he believes is from metallosis. Did you experience symptoms from metallosis and were they relieved after revision? He has always been an active athlete playing baseball and skiing for many years on his new hips. Thank you.

REPLY
@tennisgolf

Gosh. So sorry to hear – must be so very disappointing and painful. I wish you success with the new procedures.
Question: in your opinion, did you have a good surgeon? a good hospital? I have had 2 TKRs 2015 and 2018 and so far all is well and I play racquet sport so far with no real trouble. One surgeon said take antibiotics for LIFE the other said just 2 years. I plan to be a LIFEer. And I always seem to have a lot of dental procedures. Do you think age contributes to your situation? I am 78. In general, I dislike basing things on age, but it is an important factor. Not only is there age bias in the general population, but I also wonder if Doctors are affected by it?

Jump to this post

From my experience, it’s not ageism by the medical community per se. When I received my right TKR in 2015, I was 55, and only because my natural knee joint was experiencing RA erosion. I had my left TKR scheduled for late March 2020, then the COVID lockdowns hit, and I have now chosen to forego my left TKR as long as possible. I have 2 autoimmune diseases and take medications that also suppress my immune system, so my surgeon says to take antibiotics for life. I mountain bike on advanced, single track trails. I can’t imagine playing racquet sports ever again, but then my RA affects my knees, hands, arms, shoulders, spine.

REPLY
@sonia0

From my experience, it’s not ageism by the medical community per se. When I received my right TKR in 2015, I was 55, and only because my natural knee joint was experiencing RA erosion. I had my left TKR scheduled for late March 2020, then the COVID lockdowns hit, and I have now chosen to forego my left TKR as long as possible. I have 2 autoimmune diseases and take medications that also suppress my immune system, so my surgeon says to take antibiotics for life. I mountain bike on advanced, single track trails. I can’t imagine playing racquet sports ever again, but then my RA affects my knees, hands, arms, shoulders, spine.

Jump to this post

Hello @sonia0, Welcome to Connect, an online community where patients and caregivers share their experiences, find support and exchange information with others. Thank you for sharing your experience in this discussion. It really helps for members to learn from the member shared experiences.

Do you mind sharing what you were searching for when you found Connect?

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.