Total hip replacement - What to expect for recovery

Posted by cak11555 @cak11555, Nov 29, 2018

I am having a total right hip replacement in six weeks. My surgeon leaves me to believe that I will be up and around in a few days, just no kitchen work. The physical therapist who came to evaluate me before hand felt I needed exrended care after surgery. What has been others experience following this kind of surgery? How has recovery gone for you?

@lotsofpain

No we have a new downstairs as well

Jump to this post

By 3 days post surgery with every hip replacement I was able to go up and down the 7 stairs into my home. By one week, I was going out for short walks to the end of the driveway and then down the street, weight-bearing but with crutches for support. I slept in a lower bed in our guest room for a few weeks until I felt safe getting in and out of our tall bed. By 7-10 days, I was able to go up & down the 14 steps to the lower level a couple times each day. At 3 weeks on the last (5th) surgery, I even managed to go on a short road trip and walk with crutches into an outdoor venue to see Willie Nelson – with the oversight of my watchful husband and daughters.
Sue

REPLY
@lioness

@cak11555 welcome to connect we are here to talk,suggest or just listen. One thing Id like to ask you did you ask the Dr what the metal the hip is made of .?9 other people who have had hip replacement will chime in hopefully but you need to fi nd out what material the hip is made of ?As there has been alot of discussion on cobalt been used in hip replacement.

Jump to this post

My hip was put in 22 years ago and is titanium. I have never had trouble with the hip and have done everything I wanted to do within reason during those years. Now I’m feeling that my old replacement is becoming loose and I will need a revision in the near future.
I found that for about a year or so after your replacement you feel less confident When walking on certain uneven surfaces and about falling. After that you really can forget about having a bionic hip. It’s the best thing I ever did for my body. I encourage you to get one if you need one and to enjoy the rest of your life.

REPLY
@hopalongnm3

My hip was put in 22 years ago and is titanium. I have never had trouble with the hip and have done everything I wanted to do within reason during those years. Now I’m feeling that my old replacement is becoming loose and I will need a revision in the near future.
I found that for about a year or so after your replacement you feel less confident When walking on certain uneven surfaces and about falling. After that you really can forget about having a bionic hip. It’s the best thing I ever did for my body. I encourage you to get one if you need one and to enjoy the rest of your life.

Jump to this post

Glad to hear your hip has worked so well and for so long! I will be thrilled if my titanium and plastic revisions, done in 2012, last that long. The original chromium and cobalt ones were rejected within 4 years and had to be replaced. These implants also have been spectacular – just saw my surgeon this morning, and he was happy to hear I can easily go sledding with my grandsons – told me it was wonderful exercise. I just hope the rest of my body holds up as well!
Sue

REPLY

I had a direct anterior THR on 12/15/20. I could stand on it the following day. Over the past 5 weeks, walking isn't as much of a problem as getiing in and out of a chair/bed/car. I used the walker for 2 weeks and am now using a cane. I use it more for balance than pain. It also feels like that leg is longer, so my gait isn't back to "normal". Sleeping is still an issue. It's hard to find a comfortable position for more than 20 minutes -1 hour. The glue/tape is off the incision and it looks good. There is still a "knot" under the incision but it's improving slowly. The thing I find most annoying right now is getting up from a chair/bed/car and taking the first few steps. The joint stiffens up and I still have that feeling that it's going to give out on me. After I take a few steps, the feeling goes away. I am a 64 yo female. I hope this helps someone else with their expectations.

REPLY
@breick

I had a direct anterior THR on 12/15/20. I could stand on it the following day. Over the past 5 weeks, walking isn't as much of a problem as getiing in and out of a chair/bed/car. I used the walker for 2 weeks and am now using a cane. I use it more for balance than pain. It also feels like that leg is longer, so my gait isn't back to "normal". Sleeping is still an issue. It's hard to find a comfortable position for more than 20 minutes -1 hour. The glue/tape is off the incision and it looks good. There is still a "knot" under the incision but it's improving slowly. The thing I find most annoying right now is getting up from a chair/bed/car and taking the first few steps. The joint stiffens up and I still have that feeling that it's going to give out on me. After I take a few steps, the feeling goes away. I am a 64 yo female. I hope this helps someone else with their expectations.

Jump to this post

Do you know what material they used? Titanium? Did they glue?

REPLY
@palmsprings59

Do you know what material they used? Titanium? Did they glue?

Jump to this post

@palmsprings59 Mine was a direct anterior THR, but not all doctors do that method as a special operating table is needed. (Mine was done at Mayo in Rochester.) The stem is titanium. The ball is ceramic. The cup is titanium with a polyethylene liner. No glue, but one screw was placed in the cup.

REPLY
@breick

I had a direct anterior THR on 12/15/20. I could stand on it the following day. Over the past 5 weeks, walking isn't as much of a problem as getiing in and out of a chair/bed/car. I used the walker for 2 weeks and am now using a cane. I use it more for balance than pain. It also feels like that leg is longer, so my gait isn't back to "normal". Sleeping is still an issue. It's hard to find a comfortable position for more than 20 minutes -1 hour. The glue/tape is off the incision and it looks good. There is still a "knot" under the incision but it's improving slowly. The thing I find most annoying right now is getting up from a chair/bed/car and taking the first few steps. The joint stiffens up and I still have that feeling that it's going to give out on me. After I take a few steps, the feeling goes away. I am a 64 yo female. I hope this helps someone else with their expectations.

Jump to this post

It sounds like you are doing really well. Did your ortho order PT for you, beyond the little sessions in the hospital? I found I needed "gait training" to deal with the unequal leg feeling.
Sue

REPLY

@sueinmn He did not. He just said to walk and do the home exercises in the pamphlet, which I am doing. I am slowly increasing my steps each week. I have an Xray and 3 month checkup in March. I may ask at that time.

REPLY
@breick

@sueinmn He did not. He just said to walk and do the home exercises in the pamphlet, which I am doing. I am slowly increasing my steps each week. I have an Xray and 3 month checkup in March. I may ask at that time.

Jump to this post

Try and walk equal steps with each leg so you strengthen the correct muscles .

REPLY
@breick

@sueinmn He did not. He just said to walk and do the home exercises in the pamphlet, which I am doing. I am slowly increasing my steps each week. I have an Xray and 3 month checkup in March. I may ask at that time.

Jump to this post

Please don't wait! Here is what was explained to me at Courage/Kenny PT after my 5th Hip replacement/revision. When one has walked on a bad hip (or knee) for a long time, the whole body mechanics are changed. About 6-8 weeks after surgery, when the primary healing is well underway, you need to be evaluated for any imbalances in how you stand and walk, and learn to consciously correct them as you walk, and/or with targeted exercises. Otherwise you will continue to walk unbalanced, leading to back or knee pain. Mine had gotten so bad that I had to start with pool therapy and progress to land, but all the back and knee pains I had for 6 years went away,
Sue

REPLY
@breick

@palmsprings59 Mine was a direct anterior THR, but not all doctors do that method as a special operating table is needed. (Mine was done at Mayo in Rochester.) The stem is titanium. The ball is ceramic. The cup is titanium with a polyethylene liner. No glue, but one screw was placed in the cup.

Jump to this post

Thank you for your reply. Were you bone on bone by chance? My husband has no bone or little bone left. Would love to go to Rochester. Great Drs.

REPLY
@palmsprings59

Thank you for your reply. Were you bone on bone by chance? My husband has no bone or little bone left. Would love to go to Rochester. Great Drs.

Jump to this post

@palmsprings59 Yes, it was bone on bone. I had put it off for some time. The Rochester clinic is wonderful and no more expensive than anywhere else, maybe even less. My mom and I both had the direct anterior method with Dr. Taunton and Dr. Sierra did my dad's hip.

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.
  Request Appointment