Tear in shoulder labrum

Posted by angelameyer @angelameyer, Nov 27, 2020

Via an MRI a tear in my left shoulder labrum was found. I had severe pain and loss of use of the shoulder. I was told that tear was probably old not related to a simple lipoma removal in an outpatient facility on my left shoulder, but that is when the pain started. My question is, can one experience a tear labrum in your shoulder and not know it? Thanks.

Hi @angelameyer, welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I'm bringing @faithwalker007 @avmcbellar and @fourof5zs who have first-hand experiences with labrum tears.

Is it possible that the lipoma removal aggravated the torn shoulder labrum, causing increased pain?

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@colleenyoung

Hi @angelameyer, welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I'm bringing @faithwalker007 @avmcbellar and @fourof5zs who have first-hand experiences with labrum tears.

Is it possible that the lipoma removal aggravated the torn shoulder labrum, causing increased pain?

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Welcome @angelameyer

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Hi @angelameyer I did have an MRI for my diagnosis of labrum tear in my hip. My pain had started 25 years before and went through different stages. I had learned to do stretching exercises to help decrease the pain. I lastly felt a clicking sound when standing up from a sitting position. I figured I would eventually need a hip replacement until the MRI confirmed my diagnosis. My physician had told me the tear will not heal on its own. I could either continue with exercises or do a surgical repair. I was also told people who elected a surgical repair later developed arthritis in that area. Luckily for me the MRI found none after all those years. I have not done any surgery.
As for your shoulder pain have you seen an orthopedic physician? I know some people who had the surgery and after physical therapy to help with rehabilitation. If your pain level is high and use of your shoulder is very limited I would consider the surgical repair. Talk with an orthopedic physician who may do the surgery for options as to what is best for you. Ask questions what to expect following each scenario so you can make your decision. Hope this helps. Toni

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That’s a very good question, @angelmeyer .
If your surgery or rehab affected the joint or positioning of the joint in any way then yes, pain from the torn labrum could be created.

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Okay I have a torn labrum from 2 manipulations that were completed during the same month.. I’d had encapsulitis in my Right shoulder. They freed it but damaged the joint very badly. It can’t be opened up again due to my CRPS and the risk of spreading to non peripheral areas such as internal organs

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Thank you for your reply. I am going to read up on CRPS. I was diagnosed with POLYMYALGIA RHEUMATICA two years ago, am on steroids, and get blood work done very often. They are concerned with kidney functions, checking my sed rate. I also have Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertension, and to add insult to injury, a small brain aneurysm.

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@avmcbellar

Hi @angelameyer I did have an MRI for my diagnosis of labrum tear in my hip. My pain had started 25 years before and went through different stages. I had learned to do stretching exercises to help decrease the pain. I lastly felt a clicking sound when standing up from a sitting position. I figured I would eventually need a hip replacement until the MRI confirmed my diagnosis. My physician had told me the tear will not heal on its own. I could either continue with exercises or do a surgical repair. I was also told people who elected a surgical repair later developed arthritis in that area. Luckily for me the MRI found none after all those years. I have not done any surgery.
As for your shoulder pain have you seen an orthopedic physician? I know some people who had the surgery and after physical therapy to help with rehabilitation. If your pain level is high and use of your shoulder is very limited I would consider the surgical repair. Talk with an orthopedic physician who may do the surgery for options as to what is best for you. Ask questions what to expect following each scenario so you can make your decision. Hope this helps. Toni

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Toni, thank you for your reply. I have seen an orthopedic surgeon at NE Medical Center. She doesn't think I am candidate for surgery to repair, but rather total shoulder replacement. Slowly but surely I'm feeling the pain coming back after having cortisone shot two months ago. I'm still questioning her statement that the tear happened sometime prior to my lipoma surgery. Would not at the instant of the tear I would have felt pain? The MD had no real response. I don't want to endure shoulder replacement, I will get shots as long as I can. Again, thank you!

Liked by avmcbellar

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@angelameyer

Thank you for your reply. I am going to read up on CRPS. I was diagnosed with POLYMYALGIA RHEUMATICA two years ago, am on steroids, and get blood work done very often. They are concerned with kidney functions, checking my sed rate. I also have Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertension, and to add insult to injury, a small brain aneurysm.

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@angelameyer, you may wish to also join the discussion in the Polymyalgia Rheumatica (PMR) group here: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/polymyalgia-rheumatica-pmr/

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@colleenyoung

Hi @angelameyer, welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I'm bringing @faithwalker007 @avmcbellar and @fourof5zs who have first-hand experiences with labrum tears.

Is it possible that the lipoma removal aggravated the torn shoulder labrum, causing increased pain?

Jump to this post

Good question, that is what the doctor said. However, still confused that if the tear was old, when it did happen, would I not have had pain at that time? Thanks!

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@angelameyer

Toni, thank you for your reply. I have seen an orthopedic surgeon at NE Medical Center. She doesn't think I am candidate for surgery to repair, but rather total shoulder replacement. Slowly but surely I'm feeling the pain coming back after having cortisone shot two months ago. I'm still questioning her statement that the tear happened sometime prior to my lipoma surgery. Would not at the instant of the tear I would have felt pain? The MD had no real response. I don't want to endure shoulder replacement, I will get shots as long as I can. Again, thank you!

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Hi @angelameyer you’re welcome. I wish there were more answers for you. Why were you not a candidate for surgical repair but a candidate for total shoulder replacement? My elderly mother(90 years old) has had trouble with her shoulder for the past 2 years. Her physician recommended physical therapy which she did at home with home health and outpatient therapy. Both did not help her. She then went to an orthopedic physician and surgeon who diagnosed her with arthritis and recommended total shoulder replacement. She thought hard about it because she has a senior neighbor who did a total shoulder replacement and it worked out well for her. The neighbor is now pain free and able to use the shoulder. My mother at first was going to go through with the surgery but later decided against it because she felt at her age she did not want to take chances of it not working out well as her neighbor. So she endures the pain and does what she can. Despite all her ailments, my mother still lives independently in her apartment. She takes Tylenol for arthritis in the evening to decrease her pain so she can sleep. She does not do the steroid injections because of the side effects. She knows it is not good for the body and the injections do not work well for many she knows. Her pain does not go away. She claims it slowly worsens in time. Not being able to use the shoulder and the pain associated with it certainly limits your mobility. It will not get any better on its own perhaps worse so think about the outcome of your decision to make sure it is what you want in the long run. Difficult decision. Ask yourself, in doing the surgery, will the benefits outweigh the risks? I wish you well. Toni

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@avmcbellar

Hi @angelameyer you’re welcome. I wish there were more answers for you. Why were you not a candidate for surgical repair but a candidate for total shoulder replacement? My elderly mother(90 years old) has had trouble with her shoulder for the past 2 years. Her physician recommended physical therapy which she did at home with home health and outpatient therapy. Both did not help her. She then went to an orthopedic physician and surgeon who diagnosed her with arthritis and recommended total shoulder replacement. She thought hard about it because she has a senior neighbor who did a total shoulder replacement and it worked out well for her. The neighbor is now pain free and able to use the shoulder. My mother at first was going to go through with the surgery but later decided against it because she felt at her age she did not want to take chances of it not working out well as her neighbor. So she endures the pain and does what she can. Despite all her ailments, my mother still lives independently in her apartment. She takes Tylenol for arthritis in the evening to decrease her pain so she can sleep. She does not do the steroid injections because of the side effects. She knows it is not good for the body and the injections do not work well for many she knows. Her pain does not go away. She claims it slowly worsens in time. Not being able to use the shoulder and the pain associated with it certainly limits your mobility. It will not get any better on its own perhaps worse so think about the outcome of your decision to make sure it is what you want in the long run. Difficult decision. Ask yourself, in doing the surgery, will the benefits outweigh the risks? I wish you well. Toni

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Toni, I am 70, and my age along with all my other ailments played a part in excluding me from repairing the tear. I have prayed hard on this, and sometimes I laugh at myself because I lose sight of how lucky I am in so many ways. My daughter has her Master's in Social Work and she feels there is no need for any senior to be in more pain than a mild headache. That would involve some serious medication at times. C'est la vie. Thank you and again, will pray for the right decision and will pray for your Mom as well.

Liked by avmcbellar

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@angelameyer

Toni, I am 70, and my age along with all my other ailments played a part in excluding me from repairing the tear. I have prayed hard on this, and sometimes I laugh at myself because I lose sight of how lucky I am in so many ways. My daughter has her Master's in Social Work and she feels there is no need for any senior to be in more pain than a mild headache. That would involve some serious medication at times. C'est la vie. Thank you and again, will pray for the right decision and will pray for your Mom as well.

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Thank you @angelameyer you are young. Your daughter will help you decide what is best for you. I am glad she is there for you. I am 57 and also help my mother remotely. I periodically visit her in person but we video chat daily. I have taught her the modern technology so she can use the internet to communicate. She often calls friends and family. Because of her macular degeneration she has low vision. I help decipher her mail and messages on her door. I remotely pay her bills and arrange rides to her medical appointments. I keep track of everything for her. She takes care of her apartment and buys food from a local market to cook. She does well for herself. I think it gives her a purpose in life to keep going. With this pandemic she mostly stays indoors. Only goes out for medical appointments, medications, or food. She does the best she can. I am praying for you as well to stay healthy and continue to do the things you enjoy. Stay positive and take care of yourself. Toni

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