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craig7
@craig7

Posts: 3
Joined: Mar 25, 2018

No peristalsis in esophagus.

Posted by @craig7, Sun, Mar 25 2:37pm

With no peristalsis in esophagus how is it treated and what does in mean.

REPLY

Hello @craig7 and welcome to Mayo Connect.

I understand you are experiencing esophagus problems. I would like to direct you to another discussion on Connect that deals with this issue,
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/esophagus-issues/ Here you will find other Members who are also having similar problems to yours.

Also, here is a link to a Mayo Clinic website that explains more about esophagus issues,
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/achalasia/symptoms-causes/syc-20352850

If I may ask, what symptoms are you experiencing and how long have you been having this problem? What sort of diagnostic tests and/or meds have you had?

Once again, welcome to Connect and I look forward to hearing from you again.

Teresa

Hi Teresa. Thanks for your reply. I have had lots of chest spasms, heart burn recently soar throat at times and raspy voice at times. Also constant burping, gas bloating etc. I have had these symptoms for over two years and I recently had a monomety test done and I was told that my esophagus has 100% no peristalsis. I am scheduled to meet with the dr on Tuesday. But what does all this mean and how do they usually treat this and is it serious. Thank you for your response.

@craig7

Hi Teresa. Thanks for your reply. I have had lots of chest spasms, heart burn recently soar throat at times and raspy voice at times. Also constant burping, gas bloating etc. I have had these symptoms for over two years and I recently had a monomety test done and I was told that my esophagus has 100% no peristalsis. I am scheduled to meet with the dr on Tuesday. But what does all this mean and how do they usually treat this and is it serious. Thank you for your response.

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Hello @craig7
This is information from the link that I provided in my first post above. As you can see, there are non-surgical/medication as well as surgical treatments:

Nonsurgical options include: Pneumatic dilation. A balloon is inserted into the esophageal sphincter and inflated to enlarge the opening. This outpatient procedure may need to be repeated if the esophageal sphincter doesn't stay open. Nearly one-third of people treated with balloon dilation need repeat treatment within six years. Botox (botulinum toxin type A). This muscle relaxant can be injected directly into the esophageal sphincter with an endoscope. The injections may need to be repeated, and repeat injections may make it more difficult to perform surgery later if needed. Botox is generally recommended only for people who aren't good candidates for pneumatic dilation or surgery due to age or overall health. Medication. Your doctor might suggest muscle relaxants such as nitroglycerin (Nitrostat) or nifedipine (Procardia) before eating. These medications have limited treatment effect and severe side effects. Medications are generally considered only if you're not a candidate for pneumatic dilation or surgery, and Botox hasn't helped.

Surgery may be recommended for younger people because nonsurgical treatment tends to be less effective in this group. Surgical options include: Heller myotomy. The surgeon cuts the muscle at the lower end of the esophageal sphincter to allow food to pass more easily into the stomach. The procedure can be done noninvasively (laparoscopic Heller myotomy). People who have a Heller myotomy may later develop gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).
Fundoplication. The surgeon wraps the top of your stomach around the lower esophageal sphincter, to tighten the muscle and prevent acid reflux. Fundoplication might be performed at the same time as Heller myotomy, to avoid future problems with acid reflux. Fundoplication is usually done with a minimally invasive (laparoscopic) procedure.
Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The surgeon uses an endoscope inserted through your mouth and down your throat to create an incision in the inside lining of your esophagus. Then, as in a Heller myotomy, the surgeon cuts the muscle at the lower end of the esophageal sphincter. POEM doesn't include an anti-reflux procedure.

I hope your appointment goes well on Tuesday. I look forward to hearing from you again.

Teresa

@craig7

Hi Teresa. Thanks for your reply. I have had lots of chest spasms, heart burn recently soar throat at times and raspy voice at times. Also constant burping, gas bloating etc. I have had these symptoms for over two years and I recently had a monomety test done and I was told that my esophagus has 100% no peristalsis. I am scheduled to meet with the dr on Tuesday. But what does all this mean and how do they usually treat this and is it serious. Thank you for your response.

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Thank you Teresa I will let you know how I make out at the dr. Thanks for your help again

@craig7

Hi Teresa. Thanks for your reply. I have had lots of chest spasms, heart burn recently soar throat at times and raspy voice at times. Also constant burping, gas bloating etc. I have had these symptoms for over two years and I recently had a monomety test done and I was told that my esophagus has 100% no peristalsis. I am scheduled to meet with the dr on Tuesday. But what does all this mean and how do they usually treat this and is it serious. Thank you for your response.

Jump to this post

@craig7

I wish you well! I look forward to hearing from you later this week.

Teresa

Hello @craig7

I was thinking about you. I recall that you were going to have an appointment with a doctor on Tuesday of this week. I hope that appointment went well and you received some good direction as to what your next step will be.

I would enjoy hearing from you.

Teresa

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