Is there any connection with statin use and neuropathy?

Posted by sjpphil @sjpphil, Apr 27, 2016

Is there any connection with statin use and neuropathy? I have had numbness and tingling in my hands and fingers, along with severe cramping at night. One NP thought this was carpel tunnel, but my doc does not think so. Any thoughts?

@colleenyoung

Hi @sjpphil and @rabbit10, we took the question about statins and neuropathy to a pharmacist here at Mayo Clinic. She writes:

“Neuropathy is not a side effect that typically comes to mind when someone is taking a statin, but there have been case reports suggesting there may be an association. At this point, a causal relationship has not been proven (we can’t say for sure that statins are the reason these patients developed neuropathy), but it is possible, and something that is being studied. It seems that the longer a person is taking a statin, the greater the risk of neuropathy. (Statins and risk of polyneuropathy: a case-control study. Published in Neurology. 2002;58(9):1333. Authored by Gaist, et al.)

Of course, neuropathy may be caused by other things as well, so it’s good that your health care team has ordered tests to get to the bottom of it.”

I look forward to hearing the results of your testing @sjpphil.

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Hello @navilenn65 — welcome to Mayo Connect. Thank you for sharing your experience/concerns. May I ask what RYR is? Do you also have neuropathy?

I’m glad you found us. Connect is a great place to ask questions, share your health concerns and learn what other members are doing for treatments.

John

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Statin drugs can increase the risk of developing peripheral neuropathy,according to a study published in the May 14 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology. People taking statins were14 times more likely to develop peripheral neuropathy than people who were not taking statins, according to the Danish study. They went on to say that there were positive benefits of statins and the overall risk of developing neuropathy is rare. This article had the heading EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE UNTIL 4 PM ET, MAY 13 2002. I'm not quite sure of the meaning of this? Also I don't know if I trust their conclusion as to it being "rare".

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@chipper

Statin drugs can increase the risk of developing peripheral neuropathy,according to a study published in the May 14 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology. People taking statins were14 times more likely to develop peripheral neuropathy than people who were not taking statins, according to the Danish study. They went on to say that there were positive benefits of statins and the overall risk of developing neuropathy is rare. This article had the heading EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE UNTIL 4 PM ET, MAY 13 2002. I'm not quite sure of the meaning of this? Also I don't know if I trust their conclusion as to it being "rare".

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Hello @chipper, not a doubt in my mind that statin drugs can cause peripheral neuropathy and I don't think it falls in the rare category. Here are some of the research that I've found.

The implications of statin induced peripheral neuropathy
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3103035/

Statin Neuropathy Masquerading as Diabetic Autoimmune Polyneuropathy
http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/28/8/2082.1

Medication Induced Neuropathy
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11910-003-0043-8

John

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@chipper

Statin drugs can increase the risk of developing peripheral neuropathy,according to a study published in the May 14 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology. People taking statins were14 times more likely to develop peripheral neuropathy than people who were not taking statins, according to the Danish study. They went on to say that there were positive benefits of statins and the overall risk of developing neuropathy is rare. This article had the heading EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE UNTIL 4 PM ET, MAY 13 2002. I'm not quite sure of the meaning of this? Also I don't know if I trust their conclusion as to it being "rare".

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Wow I bet this is what caused my nerve pain, I am going to read your articles and thank you. I had ischemic stroke in November and about three week or so after I came down with this awful pain in both my feet and right hand .

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@chipper

Statin drugs can increase the risk of developing peripheral neuropathy,according to a study published in the May 14 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology. People taking statins were14 times more likely to develop peripheral neuropathy than people who were not taking statins, according to the Danish study. They went on to say that there were positive benefits of statins and the overall risk of developing neuropathy is rare. This article had the heading EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE UNTIL 4 PM ET, MAY 13 2002. I'm not quite sure of the meaning of this? Also I don't know if I trust their conclusion as to it being "rare".

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Very interesting on statins. I was taking bactrin 3 times a week for over a year and I started having problems with my feet and hands but no relation was diagnosed. I finally figured out I was allergic to it as my skin in certain areas turned brown and around my hips (mostly) was hive like and blistering. Once I stopped taking it the hives cleared up. When you have an autoimmune it is easy to blame everything on that problem when it could be various issues related to medication. I was formally diagnosed by Mayo Clinic as Peripheral neuropathy so I know that is what I had. I also have severe calcinosis. Has that been tied to anything? So far nobody has helped me with this issue??? If anyone has this or knows of any experts in this area I would love to get that info.

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I believe that taking statins caused my peripheral neuropathy. I’m on Lyrica now and quit the statins. I have improved, but every time I try to restart statins I get excruciating leg cramps. So, I won’t be taking them anymore.

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This is not in reply to any specific question or individual, but I am wondering if anyone's doctor who prescribed statins recommended that you also take a supplement called CoQ10? My PCP suggested that to me when he handed me the prescription and I have not experienced the pain in my fingers and feet that I had when I was previously on a statin drug. My wife also uses it and she could not tolerate the pain that came with a statin prior to this supplement. Has anyone who is on a statin and experiencing pain tried this? It is one more cost added to your pharmacy bill, but if the statin keeps my blood flowing more smoothly and I avoid a major heart episode in my life, then it is worth what I pay for it.

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@gman007

This is not in reply to any specific question or individual, but I am wondering if anyone's doctor who prescribed statins recommended that you also take a supplement called CoQ10? My PCP suggested that to me when he handed me the prescription and I have not experienced the pain in my fingers and feet that I had when I was previously on a statin drug. My wife also uses it and she could not tolerate the pain that came with a statin prior to this supplement. Has anyone who is on a statin and experiencing pain tried this? It is one more cost added to your pharmacy bill, but if the statin keeps my blood flowing more smoothly and I avoid a major heart episode in my life, then it is worth what I pay for it.

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@gman007– My GP did not mention this, but through my research I came to a better understanding of how as we age the natural form og CoQ10 is depleted and much more so with the use of statin drugs. I highly recommend using it and there are many forms out there, especially on the price point. I purchase most of my suppements through a USA based facility called Stop Aging Now. I take Max-Q10 Ultra PQQ which contains 200 mg of CoQ10 as ubiquinone, 200 mg of L-carnitine, 100 mg of Omega-3 complex, 50 mg of Trans-resveratrol , 10 mg of Pymoloquinoline, 5 mg of black pepper. Sounds like a lot of stuff, but has really made a difference with my PN. I also take Tumeric.

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@gman007

This is not in reply to any specific question or individual, but I am wondering if anyone's doctor who prescribed statins recommended that you also take a supplement called CoQ10? My PCP suggested that to me when he handed me the prescription and I have not experienced the pain in my fingers and feet that I had when I was previously on a statin drug. My wife also uses it and she could not tolerate the pain that came with a statin prior to this supplement. Has anyone who is on a statin and experiencing pain tried this? It is one more cost added to your pharmacy bill, but if the statin keeps my blood flowing more smoothly and I avoid a major heart episode in my life, then it is worth what I pay for it.

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I appreciate your not wanting a heart attack, but as I look back now at my need for statins, there are times I almost wish I would have died than to have to live with the constant pain of neuropathy that I believe that statins caused me. My doctor told me " don't expect this to go away."

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@gman007

This is not in reply to any specific question or individual, but I am wondering if anyone's doctor who prescribed statins recommended that you also take a supplement called CoQ10? My PCP suggested that to me when he handed me the prescription and I have not experienced the pain in my fingers and feet that I had when I was previously on a statin drug. My wife also uses it and she could not tolerate the pain that came with a statin prior to this supplement. Has anyone who is on a statin and experiencing pain tried this? It is one more cost added to your pharmacy bill, but if the statin keeps my blood flowing more smoothly and I avoid a major heart episode in my life, then it is worth what I pay for it.

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Chipper, I am sorry you have to deal with this. Hopefully at some point you will feel a little better. About a year after stopping statins, I could walk without a lot of pain. I take a low dose of lyrica which helps too.

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@gman007

This is not in reply to any specific question or individual, but I am wondering if anyone's doctor who prescribed statins recommended that you also take a supplement called CoQ10? My PCP suggested that to me when he handed me the prescription and I have not experienced the pain in my fingers and feet that I had when I was previously on a statin drug. My wife also uses it and she could not tolerate the pain that came with a statin prior to this supplement. Has anyone who is on a statin and experiencing pain tried this? It is one more cost added to your pharmacy bill, but if the statin keeps my blood flowing more smoothly and I avoid a major heart episode in my life, then it is worth what I pay for it.

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With so many millions of people who suffer from this painful neuropathy, you would think that some doctor would find something that works. We have been to around 18 doctors and all that is offered is pain medication. With lots and lots of research, you will find that the pain medication only works for a while and even the largest dosage soon does not stop the pain. I have found some statements on the internet that the pain medication, while helping some with the pain, will many time make the condition worse. I really believe that when something is found to stop this pain and really help this condition, it will be something to do with nutrition. Doctors are not trained in the field of nutrition and know absolutely nothing about eating right and taking vitamins. Our doctors will not even talk with us about nutrition. I spend 20 to 40 hours per week doing research. I can understand your pain because I watch the one I love hurt so badly all the time. I am determined to research and keep trying things to "rule out" until I find something that will help. I feel alone most of the time because the doctors will not help me. When I ask for a test to be ordered, many times they laugh at me and just refuse. If I do find anything that works or helps, I will be sure to post and hope all of you post anything that helps you. Wishing you the best, Chipper.

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@gman007

This is not in reply to any specific question or individual, but I am wondering if anyone's doctor who prescribed statins recommended that you also take a supplement called CoQ10? My PCP suggested that to me when he handed me the prescription and I have not experienced the pain in my fingers and feet that I had when I was previously on a statin drug. My wife also uses it and she could not tolerate the pain that came with a statin prior to this supplement. Has anyone who is on a statin and experiencing pain tried this? It is one more cost added to your pharmacy bill, but if the statin keeps my blood flowing more smoothly and I avoid a major heart episode in my life, then it is worth what I pay for it.

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"The protocol works" is a group of vitamins and supplements that are getting very positive results reducing pain by regenerating nerves, for a lot of people, according to their internet comments. I am currently taking these with some improvement. Check it out, they have a very active internet group. Items can be ordered at http://www.solutions2pnpd.com/products

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