Is spelling a lost art?

Posted by ellerbracke @ellerbracke, Sun, Oct 13 5:28pm

I notice so many times that there’s a “d” missing. It useD to be, it is supposeD to be…… not sure if whatever device’s spell check is supposeD to be picking this up, and yes, everybody gets casual sometimes. Not even touching there, their, they’re…… takes just a little time to get it right. I had to learn English mostly by reading books, and I have a little jolt every time I see spelling errors. But, in the greater scheme of things, ii is irritating, but not crucial.

Yikes! I messed up! Please read “it”, not ii! Also, quite frequently I found that people who learn English as a second language are more careful about grammar and spelling. Just saying….

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@ellerbracke
I doubt you’ll very often see perfect spelling or grammar or hear flawless enunciation etc. I understand your not targeting anyone and only making a general statement. The last forum I was on, a girl always corrected members who failed to use the correct form of a word. All she accomplished was to make people angry. My English skills are indeed poor but being unable to go to school, having lost much of my memory, being in multiple comas for months at a time, each time losing more memories and abilities, having over 13,000 seizures, 75% of which were Convulsive Status Epilepticus, all of which contributed to my lack of proficiency in English and every other subject.
I’m sorry it’s irritating to you but I believe it’s better to accept people flaws and all. Unfortunately not everyone has flawless English capabilities, some for very valid reasons. Why not just assume everyone is trying their best and accept them with whatever imperfections they may have.
Jake

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@jakedduck1 : I definitely was not targeting anyone specifically. The mention of the missing D at the end was mostly because it seems to be absent more than it is added in those 2 words. And – if your reply is an example of poor spelling and grammar, I’d like to see someone do as well or better! Nothing wrong there that I can see!!

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As a very young boy I was confident and people often commented how smart I was. The confidence made me a sponge for knowledge but I was never asked to turn a book report or a term paper to any of my educators. Kindergarten was a wonderful experience and my teacher often called on me to provide the correct answers to an incredibly wide range of subjects; some that might better be known and answer by the girls in our class than a boy. Then there were answers that boys would more likely know that my hand shot up to answer as well. My knowledge seemed to be wide and deep. But we still were not asked to write papers on what we knew.
All of that changed in first grade. Being dyslexic and having add/hd was not known.
My self esteem was crushed and as strange as it may sound it sure seemed to me that the moment all the other classmates that didn’t have a disorder became aware that they had an advantage over me now and it felt like they piled on “ the smart kid “. I didn’t want to go to school and I started developing “ stomach aches “ that I now know were fear based I was suddenly and constantly afraid of being called on and being wrong. Worst of all was to stand up and read. I recall starting to stutter. At home my father piled on with “ WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU “ in a few years I got FAT and developed boobs and never wanted to take my shirt off. I’m not sure that it’s fair to say it was because I forgot the “d “ at the end of a word but I went from feeling brilliant to thinking that I was stupid. I HATED RED PENCILS because everything I turned in was marked, circled, written in the margins, and it seemed that F or D- was the only grade I got. I lived in constant fear of being left back. College was worst of all and bad grades lead to a change in draft status. An I in English Comp turned my 2s to a 1a that meant VietNam was in my future.
Returning alive after serving my sentence for poor spelling, punctuation, and grammar I heard about “ a progressive college “ in Gainesville Fl. With the GI bill paying my way I decided to try again.
The first day in English Comp 101 we were told that there were no red pencils and our grades were based on content and not spelling, punctuation, or grammar. “ we want to know what you THINK! Editors will take care of spelling, punctuation, and grammar if YOU THINK IT NEEDS TO BE CHANGED OR ‘ CORRECTED ‘ “ Our first assignment was to keep a journal and turn it in on Friday.
Our journals had comments written across the top of the first page or in some cases 2 pages. Everyone was reading what was said and sharing the “ feedback “ that our teacher wrote. I didn’t get mine back until class was over and the teacher asked me to stay after class. She held it in her hand and looked at me for a pregnant moment in time. When she handed it back she didn’t let go. She told me that she didn’t want to give it back but she realized that in 4 more days she would get it back again.
There were no red marks but there were three pages starting with how she prepared to read it after first opening it. She saw that unlike other journals that were a paragraph or two mine was 17 pages of hand printed words in different color inks over all hours of the days and nights until I turned it in. She went on the day that it freighters her at first, then it made her laugh and cry and read some lines and paragraphs over several times over the weekend. She told me that she shared some of it with her husband who was a lit professor at U of F and also read some to a visiting author. She told me that they wanted to meet me and I cried G damn it! I cried remembering all of those big RED F’s and ridicule and criticism that made me feel STUPID FOR 20 years.
That misspelled word didn’t matter here.
I maintained a 4.0 average for 2 years with one quarter when I took a double load.
Interesting isn’t it?

REPLY
@stuckonu

As a very young boy I was confident and people often commented how smart I was. The confidence made me a sponge for knowledge but I was never asked to turn a book report or a term paper to any of my educators. Kindergarten was a wonderful experience and my teacher often called on me to provide the correct answers to an incredibly wide range of subjects; some that might better be known and answer by the girls in our class than a boy. Then there were answers that boys would more likely know that my hand shot up to answer as well. My knowledge seemed to be wide and deep. But we still were not asked to write papers on what we knew.
All of that changed in first grade. Being dyslexic and having add/hd was not known.
My self esteem was crushed and as strange as it may sound it sure seemed to me that the moment all the other classmates that didn’t have a disorder became aware that they had an advantage over me now and it felt like they piled on “ the smart kid “. I didn’t want to go to school and I started developing “ stomach aches “ that I now know were fear based I was suddenly and constantly afraid of being called on and being wrong. Worst of all was to stand up and read. I recall starting to stutter. At home my father piled on with “ WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU “ in a few years I got FAT and developed boobs and never wanted to take my shirt off. I’m not sure that it’s fair to say it was because I forgot the “d “ at the end of a word but I went from feeling brilliant to thinking that I was stupid. I HATED RED PENCILS because everything I turned in was marked, circled, written in the margins, and it seemed that F or D- was the only grade I got. I lived in constant fear of being left back. College was worst of all and bad grades lead to a change in draft status. An I in English Comp turned my 2s to a 1a that meant VietNam was in my future.
Returning alive after serving my sentence for poor spelling, punctuation, and grammar I heard about “ a progressive college “ in Gainesville Fl. With the GI bill paying my way I decided to try again.
The first day in English Comp 101 we were told that there were no red pencils and our grades were based on content and not spelling, punctuation, or grammar. “ we want to know what you THINK! Editors will take care of spelling, punctuation, and grammar if YOU THINK IT NEEDS TO BE CHANGED OR ‘ CORRECTED ‘ “ Our first assignment was to keep a journal and turn it in on Friday.
Our journals had comments written across the top of the first page or in some cases 2 pages. Everyone was reading what was said and sharing the “ feedback “ that our teacher wrote. I didn’t get mine back until class was over and the teacher asked me to stay after class. She held it in her hand and looked at me for a pregnant moment in time. When she handed it back she didn’t let go. She told me that she didn’t want to give it back but she realized that in 4 more days she would get it back again.
There were no red marks but there were three pages starting with how she prepared to read it after first opening it. She saw that unlike other journals that were a paragraph or two mine was 17 pages of hand printed words in different color inks over all hours of the days and nights until I turned it in. She went on the day that it freighters her at first, then it made her laugh and cry and read some lines and paragraphs over several times over the weekend. She told me that she shared some of it with her husband who was a lit professor at U of F and also read some to a visiting author. She told me that they wanted to meet me and I cried G damn it! I cried remembering all of those big RED F’s and ridicule and criticism that made me feel STUPID FOR 20 years.
That misspelled word didn’t matter here.
I maintained a 4.0 average for 2 years with one quarter when I took a double load.
Interesting isn’t it?

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One of my grandsons is dyslexic, so I know first hand the effort it takes to keep up with the “normal” kids.

REPLY
@stuckonu

As a very young boy I was confident and people often commented how smart I was. The confidence made me a sponge for knowledge but I was never asked to turn a book report or a term paper to any of my educators. Kindergarten was a wonderful experience and my teacher often called on me to provide the correct answers to an incredibly wide range of subjects; some that might better be known and answer by the girls in our class than a boy. Then there were answers that boys would more likely know that my hand shot up to answer as well. My knowledge seemed to be wide and deep. But we still were not asked to write papers on what we knew.
All of that changed in first grade. Being dyslexic and having add/hd was not known.
My self esteem was crushed and as strange as it may sound it sure seemed to me that the moment all the other classmates that didn’t have a disorder became aware that they had an advantage over me now and it felt like they piled on “ the smart kid “. I didn’t want to go to school and I started developing “ stomach aches “ that I now know were fear based I was suddenly and constantly afraid of being called on and being wrong. Worst of all was to stand up and read. I recall starting to stutter. At home my father piled on with “ WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU “ in a few years I got FAT and developed boobs and never wanted to take my shirt off. I’m not sure that it’s fair to say it was because I forgot the “d “ at the end of a word but I went from feeling brilliant to thinking that I was stupid. I HATED RED PENCILS because everything I turned in was marked, circled, written in the margins, and it seemed that F or D- was the only grade I got. I lived in constant fear of being left back. College was worst of all and bad grades lead to a change in draft status. An I in English Comp turned my 2s to a 1a that meant VietNam was in my future.
Returning alive after serving my sentence for poor spelling, punctuation, and grammar I heard about “ a progressive college “ in Gainesville Fl. With the GI bill paying my way I decided to try again.
The first day in English Comp 101 we were told that there were no red pencils and our grades were based on content and not spelling, punctuation, or grammar. “ we want to know what you THINK! Editors will take care of spelling, punctuation, and grammar if YOU THINK IT NEEDS TO BE CHANGED OR ‘ CORRECTED ‘ “ Our first assignment was to keep a journal and turn it in on Friday.
Our journals had comments written across the top of the first page or in some cases 2 pages. Everyone was reading what was said and sharing the “ feedback “ that our teacher wrote. I didn’t get mine back until class was over and the teacher asked me to stay after class. She held it in her hand and looked at me for a pregnant moment in time. When she handed it back she didn’t let go. She told me that she didn’t want to give it back but she realized that in 4 more days she would get it back again.
There were no red marks but there were three pages starting with how she prepared to read it after first opening it. She saw that unlike other journals that were a paragraph or two mine was 17 pages of hand printed words in different color inks over all hours of the days and nights until I turned it in. She went on the day that it freighters her at first, then it made her laugh and cry and read some lines and paragraphs over several times over the weekend. She told me that she shared some of it with her husband who was a lit professor at U of F and also read some to a visiting author. She told me that they wanted to meet me and I cried G damn it! I cried remembering all of those big RED F’s and ridicule and criticism that made me feel STUPID FOR 20 years.
That misspelled word didn’t matter here.
I maintained a 4.0 average for 2 years with one quarter when I took a double load.
Interesting isn’t it?

Jump to this post

@stuckonu SO powerful! I was just talking to my friend who is a reading teacher in elementary and middle school. She would love what you’ve said! Becky

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@becsbuddy

@stuckonu SO powerful! I was just talking to my friend who is a reading teacher in elementary and middle school. She would love what you’ve said! Becky

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Thanx Becky for seeing me! That teacher changed my life! Then when I went back to thank her again she decided to end her life before I got home. Why? I only know that she left knowing that she saved my life. I wish I had a chance to perhaps save hers.

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@stuckonu

Thanx Becky for seeing me! That teacher changed my life! Then when I went back to thank her again she decided to end her life before I got home. Why? I only know that she left knowing that she saved my life. I wish I had a chance to perhaps save hers.

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@stuckonu Oh, how very sad. That must have been so hard for you. But she lives on through you and your success

REPLY
@stuckonu

As a very young boy I was confident and people often commented how smart I was. The confidence made me a sponge for knowledge but I was never asked to turn a book report or a term paper to any of my educators. Kindergarten was a wonderful experience and my teacher often called on me to provide the correct answers to an incredibly wide range of subjects; some that might better be known and answer by the girls in our class than a boy. Then there were answers that boys would more likely know that my hand shot up to answer as well. My knowledge seemed to be wide and deep. But we still were not asked to write papers on what we knew.
All of that changed in first grade. Being dyslexic and having add/hd was not known.
My self esteem was crushed and as strange as it may sound it sure seemed to me that the moment all the other classmates that didn’t have a disorder became aware that they had an advantage over me now and it felt like they piled on “ the smart kid “. I didn’t want to go to school and I started developing “ stomach aches “ that I now know were fear based I was suddenly and constantly afraid of being called on and being wrong. Worst of all was to stand up and read. I recall starting to stutter. At home my father piled on with “ WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU “ in a few years I got FAT and developed boobs and never wanted to take my shirt off. I’m not sure that it’s fair to say it was because I forgot the “d “ at the end of a word but I went from feeling brilliant to thinking that I was stupid. I HATED RED PENCILS because everything I turned in was marked, circled, written in the margins, and it seemed that F or D- was the only grade I got. I lived in constant fear of being left back. College was worst of all and bad grades lead to a change in draft status. An I in English Comp turned my 2s to a 1a that meant VietNam was in my future.
Returning alive after serving my sentence for poor spelling, punctuation, and grammar I heard about “ a progressive college “ in Gainesville Fl. With the GI bill paying my way I decided to try again.
The first day in English Comp 101 we were told that there were no red pencils and our grades were based on content and not spelling, punctuation, or grammar. “ we want to know what you THINK! Editors will take care of spelling, punctuation, and grammar if YOU THINK IT NEEDS TO BE CHANGED OR ‘ CORRECTED ‘ “ Our first assignment was to keep a journal and turn it in on Friday.
Our journals had comments written across the top of the first page or in some cases 2 pages. Everyone was reading what was said and sharing the “ feedback “ that our teacher wrote. I didn’t get mine back until class was over and the teacher asked me to stay after class. She held it in her hand and looked at me for a pregnant moment in time. When she handed it back she didn’t let go. She told me that she didn’t want to give it back but she realized that in 4 more days she would get it back again.
There were no red marks but there were three pages starting with how she prepared to read it after first opening it. She saw that unlike other journals that were a paragraph or two mine was 17 pages of hand printed words in different color inks over all hours of the days and nights until I turned it in. She went on the day that it freighters her at first, then it made her laugh and cry and read some lines and paragraphs over several times over the weekend. She told me that she shared some of it with her husband who was a lit professor at U of F and also read some to a visiting author. She told me that they wanted to meet me and I cried G damn it! I cried remembering all of those big RED F’s and ridicule and criticism that made me feel STUPID FOR 20 years.
That misspelled word didn’t matter here.
I maintained a 4.0 average for 2 years with one quarter when I took a double load.
Interesting isn’t it?

Jump to this post

@stuckonu As a teenager, I started doing one-on-one tutoring of elementary school children, in reading. Way back then it was not really recognized to define reading or comprehension issues, or behavioral concerns. One little girl was the #2 child of 4, and was often forgotten in the family. She also had a learning disability which put her behind younger siblings. With her willingness and excitement to learn, over the course of a year of one-on-one teaching, she improved three grades. She really wanted/needed to feel she had someone to focus on her, not be "one of the four". Another young man had ADHD and was on strong medications. Once again, his learning disorder needed focusing, and he was fine. By thinking about the end result, we accomplished alot, my young students and I. Now, I have taught reading to adults who either have English as a second language, or who never really learned to read. It is rewarding work, and made me realize how difficult the English language is. Kudos to you for your strength of character.
Ginger

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@gingerw

@stuckonu As a teenager, I started doing one-on-one tutoring of elementary school children, in reading. Way back then it was not really recognized to define reading or comprehension issues, or behavioral concerns. One little girl was the #2 child of 4, and was often forgotten in the family. She also had a learning disability which put her behind younger siblings. With her willingness and excitement to learn, over the course of a year of one-on-one teaching, she improved three grades. She really wanted/needed to feel she had someone to focus on her, not be "one of the four". Another young man had ADHD and was on strong medications. Once again, his learning disorder needed focusing, and he was fine. By thinking about the end result, we accomplished alot, my young students and I. Now, I have taught reading to adults who either have English as a second language, or who never really learned to read. It is rewarding work, and made me realize how difficult the English language is. Kudos to you for your strength of character.
Ginger

Jump to this post

@gingerw : Your comments show that an individualized approach can make all the difference in someone’s success. I thought it interesting that you mentioned the difficulty of the English language. I’d have to say yes, and no. My husband had a very successful Swiss co-worker whose vocabulary probably never exceeded 300 basic words in English, but he ended up quite wealthy even though he was in the sales field. So I think the bare necessity to get by in every day life is fairly easy. On the other hand, I find English much more nuanced compared to my native German language. There’s an incredibly large vocabulary to learn, and I still come across unfamiliar words. I had 2 years of English at the junior high level, then did not use this for several years. To speed up the recovery of lost knowledge, I read a lot of books, without using a dictionary. Over time I learned what words mean in context (and how to use them in context), and now I am seldom stumped. And as a bonus, after thousands of books, I seem to have developed an internal spell check. I may not know 100% of the correct spelling, but I can sense when something seems off. Sort of like I can’t hold a tune, but can tell when something is off-key.

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@becsbuddy

@stuckonu Oh, how very sad. That must have been so hard for you. But she lives on through you and your success

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Ya know Becky how some teachers live on in many ways on many levels and many dimensions. She believed in me and I believe in her. I believe in miracles now because I met one!

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@gingerw

@stuckonu As a teenager, I started doing one-on-one tutoring of elementary school children, in reading. Way back then it was not really recognized to define reading or comprehension issues, or behavioral concerns. One little girl was the #2 child of 4, and was often forgotten in the family. She also had a learning disability which put her behind younger siblings. With her willingness and excitement to learn, over the course of a year of one-on-one teaching, she improved three grades. She really wanted/needed to feel she had someone to focus on her, not be "one of the four". Another young man had ADHD and was on strong medications. Once again, his learning disorder needed focusing, and he was fine. By thinking about the end result, we accomplished alot, my young students and I. Now, I have taught reading to adults who either have English as a second language, or who never really learned to read. It is rewarding work, and made me realize how difficult the English language is. Kudos to you for your strength of character.
Ginger

Jump to this post

You saw the possibilities and drew them out as the seers do. Thank you for making the world a better place Ginger

REPLY
@ellerbracke

@gingerw : Your comments show that an individualized approach can make all the difference in someone’s success. I thought it interesting that you mentioned the difficulty of the English language. I’d have to say yes, and no. My husband had a very successful Swiss co-worker whose vocabulary probably never exceeded 300 basic words in English, but he ended up quite wealthy even though he was in the sales field. So I think the bare necessity to get by in every day life is fairly easy. On the other hand, I find English much more nuanced compared to my native German language. There’s an incredibly large vocabulary to learn, and I still come across unfamiliar words. I had 2 years of English at the junior high level, then did not use this for several years. To speed up the recovery of lost knowledge, I read a lot of books, without using a dictionary. Over time I learned what words mean in context (and how to use them in context), and now I am seldom stumped. And as a bonus, after thousands of books, I seem to have developed an internal spell check. I may not know 100% of the correct spelling, but I can sense when something seems off. Sort of like I can’t hold a tune, but can tell when something is off-key.

Jump to this post

I managed to get through school with a combination of charm and flim flam. It didn’t matter in the early years to be “ book smart “ because I was street smart. While in the Army I started reading books that seemed interesting to me and some that I heard mentioned by people I valued.
A group of Berkley students were discussing a required reading book and although I was festinated by the conversation I could join in because I had no reference point. I got the book and read it but when I finished I wondered what the heck it all meant. So I read it again and again until I felt as if I could discuss it. The book was Steppenwolf by Herman Hesse. Lots of Germans over the years seemed puzzled by the American interest in THAT BOOK.
I never figured out the reason one culture loved that book and another culture couldn’t understand it. Talk about lost in translation

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@stuckonu

Ya know Becky how some teachers live on in many ways on many levels and many dimensions. She believed in me and I believe in her. I believe in miracles now because I met one!

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@stuckonu This made me smile!

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@becsbuddy

@stuckonu This made me smile!

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One of the things I’m most proud of is the ability to make people smile. So happy to oblige Becky.

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