Neuropathy and depression and anxiety

Posted by jordchud62 @jordchud62, Apr 17, 2019

I suffer from neuropathy in my feet and lower legs, and am extremely frustrated as this makes my depression and anxiety worse. Any help is appreciated. Thank You.

@rwinney

Isn't it something? How we are all a story, a book, a novel.

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If we each embrace our story and know that we have grown, gained strength and endured… maybe we can feel as if we are accomplished writers of our own book (for some, novel). I definitely see a few Nobel Peace winners here! 😉

Be proud of your accomplishments. Let your survival fuel you further. I'm humbled by where others have been and am grateful that you share your stories. 😊

Be well ~
Rachel

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@rwinney

Isn't it something? How we are all a story, a book, a novel.

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So many people have asked me to write a book about my life, but I tell them that it would have to be anonymous because I don’t want my kids to know all about me.😁 I feel as though I have lived many lives. My father and I used to entertain the troops during WW II. I started to sing in four languages when I was 18 months old. You can teach a kid anything. I was the opening act and sang the Star Spangled Banner when some of the big bands came to town during WW II. Later in life, I sang professionally in California. But that is a tiny part of who I am. I had so many careers in my life. I was a nurse for a short time and then I went back to school and got a master’s degree in geophysics and worked for the government on top secret projects, I also designed and built custom furniture, had a business in art conservation and worked on Picasso’s drawings, sculptures from the Palace at Versailles, as well as many other painters, designed and made gowns and suits and my husband and I built a four story passive solar hillside house near the ocean in Monterey County, California. We did this on weekends for five years while we worked for the government on weekdays. Busy, busy life. I met a lot of interesting people along the way, particularly in the arts. I learned to play golf with a pro at Pebble Beach and that is where I played my very first game of golf. I played on those courses for 10 years until we moved to Palm Springs. I changed my life around and worked in a special floor at Desert Hospital for patients with AIDS. Those were the days when they all died. I had a lot of friends with AIDS and I lost over 50 of them. I cried a lot and became numb to life around me. It was a sad time. So you can see how my life changed over and over. Now I am stuck in my wheelchair, but I feel that I have experienced a lot of life and I have so many memories to look back upon.

042CA686-34D3-4B36-AC50-FA7560925467

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@darlingtondoll

So many people have asked me to write a book about my life, but I tell them that it would have to be anonymous because I don’t want my kids to know all about me.😁 I feel as though I have lived many lives. My father and I used to entertain the troops during WW II. I started to sing in four languages when I was 18 months old. You can teach a kid anything. I was the opening act and sang the Star Spangled Banner when some of the big bands came to town during WW II. Later in life, I sang professionally in California. But that is a tiny part of who I am. I had so many careers in my life. I was a nurse for a short time and then I went back to school and got a master’s degree in geophysics and worked for the government on top secret projects, I also designed and built custom furniture, had a business in art conservation and worked on Picasso’s drawings, sculptures from the Palace at Versailles, as well as many other painters, designed and made gowns and suits and my husband and I built a four story passive solar hillside house near the ocean in Monterey County, California. We did this on weekends for five years while we worked for the government on weekdays. Busy, busy life. I met a lot of interesting people along the way, particularly in the arts. I learned to play golf with a pro at Pebble Beach and that is where I played my very first game of golf. I played on those courses for 10 years until we moved to Palm Springs. I changed my life around and worked in a special floor at Desert Hospital for patients with AIDS. Those were the days when they all died. I had a lot of friends with AIDS and I lost over 50 of them. I cried a lot and became numb to life around me. It was a sad time. So you can see how my life changed over and over. Now I am stuck in my wheelchair, but I feel that I have experienced a lot of life and I have so many memories to look back upon.

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You my dear, are a novel! ☺

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@darlingtondoll

You will get through this. Keep thinking about those grandchildren and when you get depressed, close your eyes and think about their cute faces. You can start over even at this stage of your life. Your horse and dog love you whether you have hair or not. Go out and hug your horse. I had to start over too after a divorce and I lost everything. It looked bleak, but I found love again. I thank God for this every day.

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Your lucky to still be able to love again, I don’t feel I can anymore

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@rwinney

Isn't it something? How we are all a story, a book, a novel.

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Yes we are all a story or a book!

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@grandmar

@jordchud62

Welcome!

I am @grandmar, also known as Ronnie.
I have been diagnosed with neuropathy (I don't know what kind) and I have been suffering from generalized anxiety since I was a VERY YOUNG child.

I was just diagnosed with neuropathy a couple of months ago. Since I had 2 spinal surgeries within 7 months of each other, I really didn't notice that thinks were happening. I fell a several times, but hit the ground only twice. I assumed it was related to the recovery of my surgeries and the pain and pain meds I was taking.

I noticed back in June that when I sat with my feet flat on the ground, my right foot would not sway left to right/right to left. I also noticed that I had difficulty lifting my toes from that position. Long story short, my right big toe does not move at all and my foot drags, especially at the end of the day. I am walking with a cane and I will be getting a brace for my right leg in a few weeks. I am fortunate that I have not developed any pain like many others have.

As for my left foot, I have some neuropathy there, too, but not to extent of the right foot. I've had an EMG and I have significant nerve damage at S1 and L4. This can be impacting the neuropathy. So, for now, I go on. I am going to see a vascular doctor to get some other ideas. In the meanwhile, I've bee to a theraputic masseuse twice, who has been working on me. I got my toes moving a little bit.

Now for the anxiety…….
I was diagnosed with generalized anxiety more than 10 years ago. But as I said before, I've had it since I was VERY YOUNG. I used to get up from a sound sleep, with my body quivering non-stop. I wasn't cold! I'd call for my mom who would come to me an 'talk me down.' Then, in my thirties, it got worse. I'd get dizzy, my chest would hurt and my body would quiver. I'd go next door to my colleage and good friend clutching my chest, insisting I was having a heart attack. She'd ask me how long I was having symptoms. When I told her several hours, she would tell me that I would be dead if I was having a heart attack. That was good enough to calm me down.

Another story short, I went on Effexor about 15 years ago. It worked great! My PCP told me it was time to come off about a year later. The weaning was far too quick and I had a horrible reaction. I had such an anxiety attack, I couldn't go to work or even go out of the house. Throughout the years, my Effexor has been upped to meet the needs at the time. As of November 2018, I was up to two-75mg in the morning and evening. In November I started to wean down from that high dosage. I am currently down to two-75 mg in the morning and one-75 mg in the evening. It took me since November to reduce 25%. I have no intention of coming off, just going down to what I consider a reasonable amount. I will remain where I am for a couple of months to make sure my body is OK with the reduction. Then, I will begin the same process with my morning dose. My ultimate goal is 75 mg in the morning in evening. My ultimate, ultimate goal will be 37.5mg in the morning and evening, but I don't see that happening for a long, long time.

Well, that's my story and I am sticking to it! lol

Have a good rest of the day!
Ronnie (GRANDMAr)

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Oh, my, @grandmar, your story is so moving and so real. I have some nerve damage in my feet as well as numbness in my left foot, where I had surgery a year or so ago. The hammertoe surgery left me with toes that are barely movable.

I have Type 2 Diabetes, and although I have not had any nerve studies done, one can tell when there is a loss of sensation. It is ironic that nerve damage includes both pain and numbness.

As someone on the Spectrum, my senses are hypervigilant. I wear earplugs frequently, as well as sunglasses. Is it any wonder that I was finally diagnosed with Anxiety and Treatment Resistant Depression? Years of overthinking, over hearing, overseeing, overfeeling, eventually took its toll. Gene testing found that I am deficient in Folate. Folate is vital for processing Seratonin and Dopamine. So now I take a Prescription strength Folate Supplement and Vibriid, an antidepressant that is well suited for me. I take two antianxiety meds during the day. A different one before bed. Yes. That seems like a lot.

Trust me, I would not be taking them unless it was necessary. They do not make me groggy at all. I am still me. But no longer in a deep, dark pit.

I understand the feelings very well. When you cannot even walk without pain, that's pretty much a dealbreaker. It is tough to deal with, for sure.

Trying to stay positive helps me. Thinking about all these friends here helps me. We are not alone. We are better together.

Love and light,
Mamacita Jane

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@darlingtondoll

So many people have asked me to write a book about my life, but I tell them that it would have to be anonymous because I don’t want my kids to know all about me.😁 I feel as though I have lived many lives. My father and I used to entertain the troops during WW II. I started to sing in four languages when I was 18 months old. You can teach a kid anything. I was the opening act and sang the Star Spangled Banner when some of the big bands came to town during WW II. Later in life, I sang professionally in California. But that is a tiny part of who I am. I had so many careers in my life. I was a nurse for a short time and then I went back to school and got a master’s degree in geophysics and worked for the government on top secret projects, I also designed and built custom furniture, had a business in art conservation and worked on Picasso’s drawings, sculptures from the Palace at Versailles, as well as many other painters, designed and made gowns and suits and my husband and I built a four story passive solar hillside house near the ocean in Monterey County, California. We did this on weekends for five years while we worked for the government on weekdays. Busy, busy life. I met a lot of interesting people along the way, particularly in the arts. I learned to play golf with a pro at Pebble Beach and that is where I played my very first game of golf. I played on those courses for 10 years until we moved to Palm Springs. I changed my life around and worked in a special floor at Desert Hospital for patients with AIDS. Those were the days when they all died. I had a lot of friends with AIDS and I lost over 50 of them. I cried a lot and became numb to life around me. It was a sad time. So you can see how my life changed over and over. Now I am stuck in my wheelchair, but I feel that I have experienced a lot of life and I have so many memories to look back upon.

Jump to this post

@darlingtondoll, my, but you have had a fascinating life! Thank you for sharing!

My husband started the very first Aids Support Group here in our little city. This was back when the majoriry of the country thought that you could get Aids by eating or drinking after an infected person.

He would give educational.presentations all over North Alabama as part of his job in Communicable Diseases. He would have a coffee mug with him onstage, and very casually mention that the cup had previously been used by an Aids patient. While that thought was sinking in, he would slowly take a sip of hot coffee.

You can imagine how well that went over. Faces aghast. I was, and am so very proud of him for the work that he did. He was the voice of calmness in the middle of a hurricane. He was compassion where there was hatred. We lost a lot of people back then. One patient became our very dear friend. We had him in our home frequently. When he died we were heartbroken.

Bless you for all you have done for others. Enjoy your rest. And all your wonderful memories. Glad you are here with us.
Love and light,
Mamacita Jane

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I have neuropathy in my feet and legs as well as major depressive disorder and anxiety. I used to take Xanax, but it stopped working so she (my psychiatrist) switched me over to Ativan (lorazepam). I take very small doses and it works great.

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@darlingtondoll

Talk therapy works if you get the best psychiatrist to work with you. My last one was great and I learned how to deal with my very dark moods. I was in private therapy and also in group therapy. Both methods helped me, but I had to figure out how to deal with it on a daily basis. Clinical depression runs in my family on my mother’s side. It seems like is it genetic because so many family members have it. It starts in our teenage years. I have it, my son and granddaughter have it as well as several cousins and my niece and nephew. Several family members committed suicide. When I was in my twenties, I was a regular patient in the emergency room with overdoses. Group therapy is beneficial too. I learned how to change my brain and deal with my clinical depression. When I was hospitalized, I was put on Thorazine. I was in therapy with a psychiatrist for 15 years, so I understand about depression and how it affects your body. Yes, the intestines and stomach feel it too. I have had part of my large intestine removed. My last suicide attempt was 50 years ago, so I did get it under control, but I still get dark moods. I know how to get them out of my brain. I am a positive thinker now and look on the bright side of things. I don’t let myself fall into that pit of doom. It has been a struggle sometimes during those last 50 years, and I have had to help my son with his depression, but we are still here. My granddaughter sees her psychiatrist every week. She has been in therapy since she was 14 years old and has had several suicide attempts. We live with this disease but some of us have died. Okay, I wasn’t going to contribute to this thread because I am in charge of my brain and don’t suffer from this anymore, but I wanted you all to know that I understand how you feel.

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I am thankful that you wrote.
You give us hope. I especially liked “I am in charge of my brain.”

Ellis wrote that we can overcome our feelings of depression, self-downing, anxiety:
“Control your anxiety before it controls you.”

I am trying and am looking forward to the first appointment with the psychiatrist.

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@mamacita

@darlingtondoll, my, but you have had a fascinating life! Thank you for sharing!

My husband started the very first Aids Support Group here in our little city. This was back when the majoriry of the country thought that you could get Aids by eating or drinking after an infected person.

He would give educational.presentations all over North Alabama as part of his job in Communicable Diseases. He would have a coffee mug with him onstage, and very casually mention that the cup had previously been used by an Aids patient. While that thought was sinking in, he would slowly take a sip of hot coffee.

You can imagine how well that went over. Faces aghast. I was, and am so very proud of him for the work that he did. He was the voice of calmness in the middle of a hurricane. He was compassion where there was hatred. We lost a lot of people back then. One patient became our very dear friend. We had him in our home frequently. When he died we were heartbroken.

Bless you for all you have done for others. Enjoy your rest. And all your wonderful memories. Glad you are here with us.
Love and light,
Mamacita Jane

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Thank God for people like your husband. So many people are afraid be near AIDS patients. Everyone needs to be loved and accepted.

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@helenfrances

I am thankful that you wrote.
You give us hope. I especially liked “I am in charge of my brain.”

Ellis wrote that we can overcome our feelings of depression, self-downing, anxiety:
“Control your anxiety before it controls you.”

I am trying and am looking forward to the first appointment with the psychiatrist.

Jump to this post

What works for one of us may not work for another we found what works for you stick with it and God bless you

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@newzbug

I have neuropathy in my feet and legs as well as major depressive disorder and anxiety. I used to take Xanax, but it stopped working so she (my psychiatrist) switched me over to Ativan (lorazepam). I take very small doses and it works great.

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Glad you are getting relief with the lorazepam, @newzbug. Are you experiencing any side effects from the medication?

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