How to use the book "Mind over Mood"?

Posted by aliali @aliali, Jun 18 2:53pm

Several years ago, I heard about this bestseller. It was relatively costly. I purchased it, read several pages, and placed it on a shelf of my home library, believing that this books does not work for me. Now, after years, I Googled whether it is a self-help book or not; it turns out to be. So please guide me with this:
When you read, by way of example, "How to stop worrying and start living?", the first three pages will change your perspective and will provide you with hope, power support and so forth. I observed that in other books as well. Why isn't this the case for our bestseller "Mind over Mood"?! As far as I can remember, the authors provide stories for a bunch of patients with mental health disorders and some sheets I should answer myself.
1. Am I impatient?
2. How many pages should I read before I get better?
3. How would you describe this book (for those patients who read it)?
4. Any further tips/comments on how to get the most of it or any other relevant stuff?

Thanks 🙂

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Depression & Anxiety group.

Hi @aliali – I haven't read the book but was wondering if this explanation by the co-author might answer some of your questions?

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@aliali I do not have this book, but it sounds interesting. After playing the YouTube comment by the co-author, that @johnbishop posted, it sounds like a typical self-help book. That is, in my humble opinion, that you need to put the time in to work with the book. It is not a "one size fits all". You learn about your situation and condition, then are able to use the book as a course, so to speak, to work with and help yourself get better. As I have found with many self-help books over my life, you have to do the work, and commit to getting better, for things to get better. I don't think we should tell ourselves that within a certain time we will get benefit from a book, or therapy of any sort, rather to look back and see how our mindset has changed over time. For me, by keeping a journal, I can see those subtle differences in how I approach life and feel better for it. And, for me, it is a continuous journey.

How does this sound to you?
Ginger

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@gingerw

@aliali I do not have this book, but it sounds interesting. After playing the YouTube comment by the co-author, that @johnbishop posted, it sounds like a typical self-help book. That is, in my humble opinion, that you need to put the time in to work with the book. It is not a "one size fits all". You learn about your situation and condition, then are able to use the book as a course, so to speak, to work with and help yourself get better. As I have found with many self-help books over my life, you have to do the work, and commit to getting better, for things to get better. I don't think we should tell ourselves that within a certain time we will get benefit from a book, or therapy of any sort, rather to look back and see how our mindset has changed over time. For me, by keeping a journal, I can see those subtle differences in how I approach life and feel better for it. And, for me, it is a continuous journey.

How does this sound to you?
Ginger

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Thank you for all of the resources, experiences and mentoring shared on this site. So far it has surpassed the many others out there by having a greater sense of sincerity, compassion, credibility and professionalism.

I have recently tried "The Artist's Way", 25th Anniversary Edition, by Julia Cameron. Basically it has a journalling aspect, but also guided suggestions for weekly consideration, activities, questions and room for experimenting, gently, with explorations of daily living. Struggling a bit in Week 2 already to do the daily journalling, but will come back to after typing here.

As others have shared, it comes down to the individual finding one of these guides that initially meshes, and then sustains you. I like that it's a 12-week guide and does not invoke guilt or defeat if not every item is explored.

Maybe this is worth looking up on amazon for someone.

Continued best wishes on this daily, hourly journey we call life!

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@brandysparks

Thank you for all of the resources, experiences and mentoring shared on this site. So far it has surpassed the many others out there by having a greater sense of sincerity, compassion, credibility and professionalism.

I have recently tried "The Artist's Way", 25th Anniversary Edition, by Julia Cameron. Basically it has a journalling aspect, but also guided suggestions for weekly consideration, activities, questions and room for experimenting, gently, with explorations of daily living. Struggling a bit in Week 2 already to do the daily journalling, but will come back to after typing here.

As others have shared, it comes down to the individual finding one of these guides that initially meshes, and then sustains you. I like that it's a 12-week guide and does not invoke guilt or defeat if not every item is explored.

Maybe this is worth looking up on amazon for someone.

Continued best wishes on this daily, hourly journey we call life!

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@brandysparks Welcome to Mayo Clinic connect! I see you signed up as a member a few months ago and took the plunge to make your first post here! May I ask what prompted you to take a look at Connect?

Ooh, you reminded me that this resource is also in my library! I love her books. Over 20 years ago I took a series of classes at a local bookstore where I was living, based on "The Artist's Way". It was very inspiring in a small group setting. Since then I have bought and used her workbook and a daily prompt book based on it. And have found other writing/creative books/manuals Julia Cameron has written. In fact, just the other day, as I reshelved books after moving everything to paint the hallway, her books were placed together. Now, you've done it! Guess I will need to pull them out and peruse them again.

One of the things that fascinates me, is using a self-help book, either writing in the blank pages or margins, or keeping a small separate notebook. Then going back to it months or years later to look at what "spoke" to me at the time. Many times I have noted a date in those scribblings. I grew up in a house where books were sacred, and to see that over the course of time, broke the rule of writing in my books because something was so important .

I look forward to your continued participation here. You may find a discussion we have on journaling, to be of value to you. https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/journaling-the-write-stuff-for-you/
Ginger

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Hi Ginger, and everyone!
To answer your question: I decided to post a comment – after reading many posts on many of the topics over the past few months – mainly because you mentioned journaling, and I now have an experience and a resource on that to share that might be of some help or insight to others.
As brief background: I used to keep a diary when I was young, and yet it became an obligation instead of a refuge. Maybe that's why I hesitated to do any journaling for the longest, longest time til recently with this resource, and yet I'm still feeling that resistance instead of it being a release.
But that is why I got his particular book entitled "The Artist's Way", and actually read it far enough in that I could try some exercises, etc. I am completely blocked artistically on creating all the things I envision creating, even though my first career was as an Art Director. But then I gravitated into the law to become an attorney in the area of intellectual property (protecting creative works), and maybe somehow that took away my feeling that it is OK to create just for the sake of it, for the salvation and refuge it may provide. Somehow I think I feel that it isn't "enough" to "just" be creative, or express myself creatively, even though I am literally NOT doing anything with myself otherwise at this point in life. So I'm stuck. With all these ideas, these art supplies, canvases and nothing on them.

Don't know how to break the pattern, and why I can't do it – except as soon as I think about doing something creative, I feel it has to be perfect and I'm immediately defeated. One helpful sentence I did read in this book is: "Thinking is the artist's enemy." … because we can quickly "think" ourselves out of our ideas, inspirations and inclinations, reducing them to nothing worth pursuing.

Here's to finding a healthy way to get unstuck…so far, no luck, but I'm here, sharing the struggle! Welcome any and all healthy ideas on breaking the conundrum of being stuck, or really kind of "frozen" into a kind of limbo.

Thanks to all who have been there and can share.

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@brandysparks

Hi Ginger, and everyone!
To answer your question: I decided to post a comment – after reading many posts on many of the topics over the past few months – mainly because you mentioned journaling, and I now have an experience and a resource on that to share that might be of some help or insight to others.
As brief background: I used to keep a diary when I was young, and yet it became an obligation instead of a refuge. Maybe that's why I hesitated to do any journaling for the longest, longest time til recently with this resource, and yet I'm still feeling that resistance instead of it being a release.
But that is why I got his particular book entitled "The Artist's Way", and actually read it far enough in that I could try some exercises, etc. I am completely blocked artistically on creating all the things I envision creating, even though my first career was as an Art Director. But then I gravitated into the law to become an attorney in the area of intellectual property (protecting creative works), and maybe somehow that took away my feeling that it is OK to create just for the sake of it, for the salvation and refuge it may provide. Somehow I think I feel that it isn't "enough" to "just" be creative, or express myself creatively, even though I am literally NOT doing anything with myself otherwise at this point in life. So I'm stuck. With all these ideas, these art supplies, canvases and nothing on them.

Don't know how to break the pattern, and why I can't do it – except as soon as I think about doing something creative, I feel it has to be perfect and I'm immediately defeated. One helpful sentence I did read in this book is: "Thinking is the artist's enemy." … because we can quickly "think" ourselves out of our ideas, inspirations and inclinations, reducing them to nothing worth pursuing.

Here's to finding a healthy way to get unstuck…so far, no luck, but I'm here, sharing the struggle! Welcome any and all healthy ideas on breaking the conundrum of being stuck, or really kind of "frozen" into a kind of limbo.

Thanks to all who have been there and can share.

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@brandysparks Copyright law and intellectual property law are a fascinating twists on the traditional legal fields. I imagine that in itself takes outside-the-box thinking too, doesn't it?

Let's head over to the group discussion I mentioned before, and we can look over what others have been talking about. getting "unstuck" would be good for me, too. I do creative projects in a few different genres, and having a variety should help me. But it is easy to distract myself and put things aside.
Ginger

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Hi All,
I've just been catching up on this discussion and looking at the video that John, @johnbishop, posted (thanks, John). This book sounds very much like Dr. David Burns' book The Feeling Good Handbook which describes cognitive behavior therapy. I remember doing writing exercises with that and really feeling my mood changing.

If any of you have read the Burns book as well, is it the same type of content?

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@gingerw

@aliali I do not have this book, but it sounds interesting. After playing the YouTube comment by the co-author, that @johnbishop posted, it sounds like a typical self-help book. That is, in my humble opinion, that you need to put the time in to work with the book. It is not a "one size fits all". You learn about your situation and condition, then are able to use the book as a course, so to speak, to work with and help yourself get better. As I have found with many self-help books over my life, you have to do the work, and commit to getting better, for things to get better. I don't think we should tell ourselves that within a certain time we will get benefit from a book, or therapy of any sort, rather to look back and see how our mindset has changed over time. For me, by keeping a journal, I can see those subtle differences in how I approach life and feel better for it. And, for me, it is a continuous journey.

How does this sound to you?
Ginger

Jump to this post

Greetings Ginger,
I would say that this is the most sensible way through it. Probably more patience is needed.
Thanks

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