gabapentin and muscle pain

Posted by nursegigi @nursegigi, Aug 16, 2016

Has anyone every experienced muscle and facia pain from gabapentin?

@hazelblumberg

I don’t know, but I hope there’s something. Yesterday and today I’ve been pain free! I have no idea what I’m doing differently, if anything. So I’m enjoying not hurting. Had coffee with a friend who also has pain issues. It’s her back that gives her problems. She’s going to have surgery soon.

Hazel

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That's good everyone thinks pain meds stop the pain . Pain meds stops on average stop 30percent of the pain the rest is weather, food we eat and things like heat or cold therapy.

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@battlewes

That's because gabapentin don't help that sort of pain it's for nerve pain. Like fibromyalgia diabetic nerve pain.

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@battlewes Gabapentin reacts in people differently I have fibromyalgia and it didn't help me at all but some of my neuropathy friends take it and it does the best thing that helps me is a product called Fibro-Malic More types of minerals .

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I couln’t take it – I was allergic to it; my mouth started swelling and throat started closing. Take Cymbalta & a compound cream my dr. Prescribed. Nothing really seems to help completely. Just learning how to live with it like everyone else. I’m sorry for what you’ve experienced.

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The problem I have with Gabapentin, it makes me feel "like a zombie", I have no energy at all, just sit in my chair most of the day. I just feel like it's too much "work" to get up, let alone do anything. A friend has had the same problem, so his wife, a nurse, took him off of it.

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@noreenf

The problem I have with Gabapentin, it makes me feel "like a zombie", I have no energy at all, just sit in my chair most of the day. I just feel like it's too much "work" to get up, let alone do anything. A friend has had the same problem, so his wife, a nurse, took him off of it.

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@noreenf I was on Gabapentin and had the same lack of energy I,m a nurse and went of it then told Dr.

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That's unfortunate. I had that response initially, but after several years my only side effect is a bit of dizziness. My new neurologist told me to take double dose at bedtime and only one 300 mg in the morning. That helps a lot for me, especially combined with my lidocaine cream.

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I have been fighting chronic pain for 35 years (I a 69 year old female.) Early on the pain was the result of a pair rear-end collisions and a backpacking injury. Left with 4 herniated discs which now include arthritis and continued degeneration of discs, bone spurs, daily neck pain. I also have seemed to develop a fibromyalgia stype pain as well. After many drugs, many injections,chiropractic and physical therapy, I have finally settled into a routine that helps me keep pain levels down from 7-8 to 2-3. Here is my formula: yoga for seniors, chair exercises, 120 mg. of Cymbalta each morning, 200 mg. Naproxen and 3 mg. of purest Caniboid oil in gel form that I could find/afford with each meal.. (Many health stores and clinics carry CBD Oil..no THC so no euphoria.) I walk 15- 20 minutes a day even when in pain, see my acupuncturist twice a week, and try to avoid "episodes" of major pain by slowing my life down and being present. (Zen mindfulness.) RE:acupuncture–unless you live close to a clinic that is part of the national community coop network, you will pay dearly. I pay $15 a treatment and get free treatments for my husband by serving as the receptionist one 4 1/2 hour shift a week. Go to POCA website to learn more. When the weather changes dramatically, I have learned to cancel all plans and stay indoor where I can control the climate and the fibro pain.Good luck to all. In part I am paying for overusing my body running on city streets, swing dancing, backpacking, playing softball, you name it. Also workaholic behavior meant constant cortisone and dumps in my body. But I loved my life when I was young and now I just adapt. Have kittens to amuse me, read a lot (Former literature teacher.) Watch all the cool shows I never saw during my teaching years. Feed the birds in the morning, water and prune my flowers and shrubs, see friends when I can, or follow on facebook when I am home bound. It is what it is. Acceptance and the right support have made a huge difference in my life. But it can be a long process …lately I have considered Gabapentin, but after read about it here and finding research, I am off any pharma that needs detoxiong or messes much with my neurological system. Doctors generally don't stay current with how medications they prescribe affect people. They figure the pamphlets are warning enough. It is they, not cartels, that have caused the opiod crisis, in my opinion, though desperate people who feel "hooked" and the doctors cut them off, who maybe don't figure out how to slowly reduce or aren't shown how–well I assume street drugs look better than full blown withdrawal. We each have to be our own case managers and research, keep track of our reactions, figure out what we are and are not willing to do. Love yourself and your body and you might be surprised at how much life you can restore.PeggyAnn

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@peggyann69

You and I have been on the same journey it seems. I'm turning 70 next month and have been dealing with chronic pain for most of my adult life. I too have learned to cut back on activities when I'm beginning to feel tired so I can recharge my batteries. Being mindful and accepting the energy and physical limitations of age allows me to be more active and avoid complete incapacitation because I have abused my body. My regular medication and activities are similar to yours. I take 40 MG Citalopram, 40 MG of Valsartin, liquid multi-vitamins, calcium, and insulin shot every morning. I take 65 mg of iron every other day. I take Tylenol and CBD or a combination of CBD:THC as needed during the day. I don't use this every day as my pain is very tolerable most days. When the weather changes or I have done too much walking I have more pain. I have been phone banking and canvassing for my political candidates for Congress and local city council, and have been walking for at least 2 hours at a time when I canvass. That does wear me out, but my endorphins really kick in after I'm done. I take it easy for 2-3 days after I canvass.

I am seeing my chiropractor weekly right now. He does Active Release Techniques (ART) on me. As a result of ART, I have avoided for 2 years, back surgery that would involve fusion at my L4. I have also been able to get off medications I formerly took for back surgery (laminectomy at L5-S1) and continuing pain: gabapentin, baclofen, and tramadol. Gabapentin was HORRIBLE taking and withdrawing from. By 7 months after withdrawing from Gabapentin, I withdrew from Tramadol and discovered CBD which eased my withdrawal symptoms tremendously. Without the ART, I would still be taking Tramadol for pain. I can't take NSAIDS.

I too do Restorative Yoga to keep myself limber. I'm no longer able do the poses that require knee pressure or lots of arm strength, so I've stopped doing Sun Salutation. 😓 I've also recently taken up drawing and painting again and I truly enjoy it. I get lost in doing artwork so it becomes a former of meditation for me. I think this is what is called "being in the Zone."

I'm happy we have found ways to live with our aging bodies and minds. I loved reading the book titled, From Age-ing to Sage-ing Not Aging, by Rabbi Zaman Schachter-Shalomi. It's available on Amazon if you're interested.

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@gailb Hi Gail a friend in Texas not Oregongirl, doesn't know if they will ship cbd thc to her do you know? We have 7 stores in my area.Going to hear investigate them What is it you take drops,gel or capsules and which gives you more benefit?

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@gailb I have been reading about ART and may see if someone in my area is trained in this technique. Spoke with pain specialist about some other options for pain management as steroids I cannot do. He is very soft spoken which helps me a lot. He is Asian and studied in England. Interesting accent for sure.

How is the painting coming along?

Had my flu shot which works a number on me. Better than risking the flu as there are many aides and case managers coming and going-not for me though.

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THANK YOU, ALL OF YOU, VERY MUCH. You are helping me understand the many subtleties of this condition (Neuropathy). Gabapentin calms my nervous system, I have less pain, and it doesn't make me sleepy. My GP doc said that over years it damages the liver – I said 'so what?' I take it during the day and Lyrica at night. Peggy

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I've been on Gabapentin since 2008, and I wouldn't be without it (600 mg 3 times daily), but it isn't perfect. I've tried other newer drug options and they do nothing for me. I'm not sure whether this is good or bad. Anyway, the alternative is disabling muscle pain, along with the sensation that my skin is on fire, and with other agonizing neuralgia. I'm dealing with an old neck injury, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and fibromyalgia as major players. I've learned how to deal with limited movement, and pain control is a big part of that. I've found that therapy is mostly pointless, and often causes more harm than good. However, accepting the fact that you will have pain is a major decision that you live with. That's better than a few alternatives that I can think of. I've refused opiates from the beginning, and make it clear that I will have nothing to do with addictive drugs. Anyway, the life that I have, including that of being a caregiver, is testimony to Gabapentin. More than anything, you need to be determined and refuse to give up. I don't believe there is a magic pill – somehow, somewhere, you are likely to pay for it later. Be careful what you are willing to take – only you are accountable for dealing with your own health. You must be willing to accept your limitations and be able to say no. You can't do everything, or perform like a trick pony as much of the world would have you do.

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@freshair, Thank you for your post that offers a realistic appraisal of the options and limitations of medications. I don't totally consider all therapies pointless but I carry the same banner with you….no opioids, nothing addictive. In addition to gabapentin, I have found a weekly MFR, (myofascial release) treatment very beneficial as well as 20 minutes every morning of gentle yoga stretches and strength building movements.

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re: Gabapentin/ Neurontin: spinal degenerating disk stenosis issues have had me try many meds. Gabapentin I've used the longest; years on it. It is used for autoimmune itchy skin issues too but I find little help in this. Overall I feel when taking upwards of 1800 mg/day it contributed rather than relieve RLS and also caused spooky sensation of chest/spinal cramps. Though I lack comparative proof, I am sure it diminished my though process, especially complex problem solving where a person has to have in instant memory the parts of the problem already considered…for I lack this now. It seems to have made me a bit easier to anger and some loss of our sixth sense of awareness about us. I think the damage is permanent. I've not been taking neurontin for five months, but then I am 67 years old (34 yrs with autoimmune arthritic disease). Often I would have to supplement it with various meds. taken only as needed, usually Nortriptylene for the antsy nerve sensation that hits when the body is very fatigued (that may have also been caused by Gabapentin) and Carisoprodol or Backlofen for muscle cramping, sometimes Tylenol #3 for break through pain when laboriously working. The body gets used to it as it does so many medicines, so I wind up back on the old standby, aspirin for a month or two, ceasing the neurontin to re-set the body back to as marginal a dose I can tolerate considering the chronic pain, muscle cramping, fatigue issues. Tried Humera finding lethargy came in right away with null pain relief. Methotrexate only marginally better.

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I've tried alternatives, because Gabapentin isn't perfect (and yes, sometimes you need to dry out briefly from its influence). I've found that Stinging Nettles helps with many aspects of neuralgia and arthritis. It also helps with intense muscular pain. It also keeps gout away, which a weakened liver seems to play into. Otherwise, I'd be on long-term meds for that (says the doc). Devil's Claw also can help as far as pain is concerned. However, I have not found that CBD oil is much help at all, at least in a dosage that I can afford – which is the real problem with it as a real help to anyone in my view.

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