fatigue and muscle weakeness

Posted by debminuet @debminuet, Thu, May 30 8:51am

Hi Everyone,
I have been told in a casual (non appointment) conversation with a physician at the gymn 'you have to fight ie keep exercising". I seem to just drag when I dont exercise I get more than weak and so incredibly fatigued. Does anyone else get these symptoms I belive it is from the big 3 Im on. ITs hard to tell if I should rest or move (seems like rest can induce the feeling of the need for more rest) and as much as this is true for inactivtity it seems 100 times worse on these these meds?

I have been taking the big three for 11 months and my fatigue has been horrible. I try to exercise, but it is hard. On top of it my thyroid went severely hypothyroid and I got shingles! Just keep plugging through!!!

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Thankyou so much. Another 8mths of the big 3! Does anyone know what cause this immense fatigues? Can it be harmful is the main question? Im so grateful for this o have no family at all no children my dad died this Jan and I have to run a business a home Im grateful I can take off without getting fired!!! It's no joke!

Liked by Brenda R.

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I don’t know what causes the fatigue, but I can tell you what helps me. Think of it as chemotherapy. Would you stop that if there was a chance of curing you? I think that on the really bad days. I also think it will eventually end.

Liked by heathert

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@debminuet

Thankyou so much. Another 8mths of the big 3! Does anyone know what cause this immense fatigues? Can it be harmful is the main question? Im so grateful for this o have no family at all no children my dad died this Jan and I have to run a business a home Im grateful I can take off without getting fired!!! It's no joke!

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I’m so sorry that you have lost your dad and have to face this challenge on many levels alone. You are in my thoughts each and every day.

Liked by Jennifer, Brenda R.

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@debminuet Yes I also feel fatigue. I at time feel like I just don't want to walk down the hall at work, fall asleep when ever I sit down to watch anything on TV and just do not have the ambition or motivation to do what I used to. I used to walk 4 miles a day. I have scaled down due to the fatigue. I can't get myself up early enough to do it. I try to do a scaled down version because Mentally and Emotionally, I think it makes me feel better.

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Does anyone know if the antibiotics are causing the fatigue and weight loss that many of us experience? Does it get better after finishing a long-term course of treatment?

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@erawl I can only speak for myself. The answer is yes. I hope it gets better for you. Talk to your ID doctor. Perhaps, he/she can give you advice on that – maybe an alternative treatment may be better for you.

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@erawl I have had MAC and Bronc for twelve years. I was only on meds for five months and lost quite a bit of hearing so I quit. I am almost always in some state of fatigue. It is especially bad in the mornings. It is part of having MAC, with or without meds you are going to be tired. I force myself to take short walks and to work out 20 min. at a gym twice a week. Sometimes I will do walking laps in the house. There are days when all I can do is cave in but most days I fight back. Nebulizing a saline makes a big difference. If I can clear my lungs, I am not fatigued. I do it twice a day. The disease has not progressed much over the years. But, I am by nature a slim person but I've lost 26 lbs and cannot gain it back. Eating is a problem. I have very little appetite and only eat to live. Look into alternative treatments. They have helped me over the years. God bless, Flib

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@irene5

@erawl I can only speak for myself. The answer is yes. I hope it gets better for you. Talk to your ID doctor. Perhaps, he/she can give you advice on that – maybe an alternative treatment may be better for you.

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That's encouraging. Thanks

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@flib

@erawl I have had MAC and Bronc for twelve years. I was only on meds for five months and lost quite a bit of hearing so I quit. I am almost always in some state of fatigue. It is especially bad in the mornings. It is part of having MAC, with or without meds you are going to be tired. I force myself to take short walks and to work out 20 min. at a gym twice a week. Sometimes I will do walking laps in the house. There are days when all I can do is cave in but most days I fight back. Nebulizing a saline makes a big difference. If I can clear my lungs, I am not fatigued. I do it twice a day. The disease has not progressed much over the years. But, I am by nature a slim person but I've lost 26 lbs and cannot gain it back. Eating is a problem. I have very little appetite and only eat to live. Look into alternative treatments. They have helped me over the years. God bless, Flib

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Thanks, Flib. I have the same problems of fatigue and weight loss. I've been on the Big 3 for almost 12 months and am hoping to see some improvement once I'm off them. I also have a hearing issue (tinnitus) that I'm fairly certain is attributable to the azithromycin.

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@helem

I have been taking the big three for 11 months and my fatigue has been horrible. I try to exercise, but it is hard. On top of it my thyroid went severely hypothyroid and I got shingles! Just keep plugging through!!!

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@helem Wow, Helen. That is quite a rough patch to go through. I feel for you. Hang in there, it will get better.

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@erawl

Thanks, Flib. I have the same problems of fatigue and weight loss. I've been on the Big 3 for almost 12 months and am hoping to see some improvement once I'm off them. I also have a hearing issue (tinnitus) that I'm fairly certain is attributable to the azithromycin.

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@erawl I too have been on the Big 3 – starting my tenth month, still battling weight loss, digestive issues and periodic fatigue. Yesterday I got the bad news from my pulmonologist that the latest sputum samples are still growing MAC – and sensitivity tests underway to be sure I am still on the right antibiotics, and I'll likely be seeing the infectious disease doc soon. A few weeks ago I would have been really depressed by this news and feeling sorry for myself, but…
I spent the last week working (pretty hard) with an amazing group of people, then dancing for 3 days with hundreds more. Many of the workers and dancers have serious health issues including cancer, heart issues, severe arthritis, and strokes,and a lot of the dancers were 80-90 years old. Some of the dancers had to use walkers, or lean on others, to get to the floor, but once there they were able to dance and enjoy the music. Some people whose dancing days are over just chatted and enjoyed the music.
I talked at length with a number of the people there about living with chronic, debilitating, or even terminal conditions. I spent quite a bit of time with my 51 year old friend who is battling Stage 4 stomach, esophagus & liver cancer, and is on chemo & a feeding tube, but continues to work when he can, and to help others. Sometimes he just has to leave and go rest, but it doesn't stop him, it only slows him down. Nearly all of the people I talked to shared his attitude that "Today is good, I will do whatever I can, and help however I can. Tomorrow is not guaranteed to any of us, but that's beyond my control."
That, my friends, is my model and motto for the rest of my life. I will see my doc regularly, do my meds and treatments, eat well and rest as necessary, but I WILL keep going.

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@sueinmn

@erawl I too have been on the Big 3 – starting my tenth month, still battling weight loss, digestive issues and periodic fatigue. Yesterday I got the bad news from my pulmonologist that the latest sputum samples are still growing MAC – and sensitivity tests underway to be sure I am still on the right antibiotics, and I'll likely be seeing the infectious disease doc soon. A few weeks ago I would have been really depressed by this news and feeling sorry for myself, but…
I spent the last week working (pretty hard) with an amazing group of people, then dancing for 3 days with hundreds more. Many of the workers and dancers have serious health issues including cancer, heart issues, severe arthritis, and strokes,and a lot of the dancers were 80-90 years old. Some of the dancers had to use walkers, or lean on others, to get to the floor, but once there they were able to dance and enjoy the music. Some people whose dancing days are over just chatted and enjoyed the music.
I talked at length with a number of the people there about living with chronic, debilitating, or even terminal conditions. I spent quite a bit of time with my 51 year old friend who is battling Stage 4 stomach, esophagus & liver cancer, and is on chemo & a feeding tube, but continues to work when he can, and to help others. Sometimes he just has to leave and go rest, but it doesn't stop him, it only slows him down. Nearly all of the people I talked to shared his attitude that "Today is good, I will do whatever I can, and help however I can. Tomorrow is not guaranteed to any of us, but that's beyond my control."
That, my friends, is my model and motto for the rest of my life. I will see my doc regularly, do my meds and treatments, eat well and rest as necessary, but I WILL keep going.

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sueinmn —– thank you for your post. Very inspiring for all of us.

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@sueinmn

@erawl I too have been on the Big 3 – starting my tenth month, still battling weight loss, digestive issues and periodic fatigue. Yesterday I got the bad news from my pulmonologist that the latest sputum samples are still growing MAC – and sensitivity tests underway to be sure I am still on the right antibiotics, and I'll likely be seeing the infectious disease doc soon. A few weeks ago I would have been really depressed by this news and feeling sorry for myself, but…
I spent the last week working (pretty hard) with an amazing group of people, then dancing for 3 days with hundreds more. Many of the workers and dancers have serious health issues including cancer, heart issues, severe arthritis, and strokes,and a lot of the dancers were 80-90 years old. Some of the dancers had to use walkers, or lean on others, to get to the floor, but once there they were able to dance and enjoy the music. Some people whose dancing days are over just chatted and enjoyed the music.
I talked at length with a number of the people there about living with chronic, debilitating, or even terminal conditions. I spent quite a bit of time with my 51 year old friend who is battling Stage 4 stomach, esophagus & liver cancer, and is on chemo & a feeding tube, but continues to work when he can, and to help others. Sometimes he just has to leave and go rest, but it doesn't stop him, it only slows him down. Nearly all of the people I talked to shared his attitude that "Today is good, I will do whatever I can, and help however I can. Tomorrow is not guaranteed to any of us, but that's beyond my control."
That, my friends, is my model and motto for the rest of my life. I will see my doc regularly, do my meds and treatments, eat well and rest as necessary, but I WILL keep going.

Jump to this post

@erawl I am going through the same thing right now. 17 months in on the Big 3 and still growing MAC Waiting on the sensitivity testing also. Not sure what else to do right now

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@sueinmn

@erawl I too have been on the Big 3 – starting my tenth month, still battling weight loss, digestive issues and periodic fatigue. Yesterday I got the bad news from my pulmonologist that the latest sputum samples are still growing MAC – and sensitivity tests underway to be sure I am still on the right antibiotics, and I'll likely be seeing the infectious disease doc soon. A few weeks ago I would have been really depressed by this news and feeling sorry for myself, but…
I spent the last week working (pretty hard) with an amazing group of people, then dancing for 3 days with hundreds more. Many of the workers and dancers have serious health issues including cancer, heart issues, severe arthritis, and strokes,and a lot of the dancers were 80-90 years old. Some of the dancers had to use walkers, or lean on others, to get to the floor, but once there they were able to dance and enjoy the music. Some people whose dancing days are over just chatted and enjoyed the music.
I talked at length with a number of the people there about living with chronic, debilitating, or even terminal conditions. I spent quite a bit of time with my 51 year old friend who is battling Stage 4 stomach, esophagus & liver cancer, and is on chemo & a feeding tube, but continues to work when he can, and to help others. Sometimes he just has to leave and go rest, but it doesn't stop him, it only slows him down. Nearly all of the people I talked to shared his attitude that "Today is good, I will do whatever I can, and help however I can. Tomorrow is not guaranteed to any of us, but that's beyond my control."
That, my friends, is my model and motto for the rest of my life. I will see my doc regularly, do my meds and treatments, eat well and rest as necessary, but I WILL keep going.

Jump to this post

Now that inspiration!!!

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