Esophagus issues

Posted by Brie @brie87144, Mar 17, 2017

Hello I’m not sure this is where I should ask or not but I need help understanding what all this is telling me and if anyone knows possible treatments or outcomes. I’ll give a little bit of history. I’ve only had what I know as swallowing issues for the last 4-5 months at most. Sometimes I can’t even get things to go down into my throat at all, other times I can but whatever it is just gets stuck and that’s consistent. I’ve had chronic heartburn since 2006 ish and been taking Prilosec and or 300mg of Zantac daily since. Which neither of these mess seem to help. But they help better than anything else I’ve tried. I also have a condition called Ehlers-Danlos syndrome which is a collagen disorder, and I have type 3 (hyper mobile) with mild over lapping of type 4 (vascular). I also have POTs and other autonomic dysfunction. With that being said, I was sent to GI for a consult and so far have had the pudding esophageal motility test, and the Barium swallow X-ray. They have both come back abnormal. The esophageal motility test says:

Esophageal Motility
IMPRESSION: Esophageal transit is normal for water but delayed at mid esophagus for thin and thick semisolid boluses.
FINDINGS: Esophageal transit scintigraphy performed per protocol. Graphic processed scintigraphic display reviewed in addition to the dynamic imaging.
WATER BOLUS:  The water bolus passes normally into the stomach within 10 seconds.
BOLUS 1, THIN SEMISOLID: There is hang-up of the thin semisolid bolus in the mid esophagus and at the junction of the mid and lower third, with the tracer in the mid esophagus clearing after 25 seconds and the residual activity in the distal third of the esophagus clearing x 45 s.

BOLUS 2, THICK SEMISOLID: The thick semisolid bolus shows considerable retention in the mid esophagus which predominantly clears after the second dry swallow at 40 seconds.

The Barium swallow X-ray says:
Esophagus
Moderate esophageal dysmotility is present with interrupted primary peristaltic wave, intermittent ineffective secondary peristaltic waves which are nonpropulsive. Subsequent peristaltic waves then stripped the barium bolus normally.

There is a small hiatal hernia present with free spontaneous gastroesophageal reflux noted with esophageal distention to the thoracic inlet. There is however no ulceration, stricture, or mass present. Barium pill was administered, which passed freely through the GE junction into the stomach.

My Drs impressions says esophageal motility disorder with cervical and esophageal components. 

My question is what is this all telling me. I keep looking things up but then get super confused and mixed up. I still have to go back for a upper endoscopy, an esophageal manometry, neuro speech assessment, and a video X-ray barium swallow. I can’t find anything on the speech assessment. And I’m not understanding why I have to repeat the barium test? Since medicine isn’t working what are some of the treatments or fixes to any of this. Can my esophagus just die? What happens if it stops working all together?

Sorry for the long message. I don’t live near Mayo and have to travel to get there so I don’t get a lot of time with the drs to ask these questions. They are just more concerned getting the tests done before they make sense of it to me it seems, and I am super lost and confused. Any help would be greatly appreciated

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Digestive Health group.

@jimhd

@danybegood1, @brie87144

It’s been awhile, and a lot has happened since March. For my terrible pain from peripheral neuropathy, I did a trial spinal cord stimulator implant and was approved for the permanent implant, which was done in May. My feet still burn and hurt, but it’s much, much better. I had cataract surgeries on both eyes, which has greatly improved my vision. I’ve had an endoscopy, a colonoscopy, an x-ray swallowing test, and a scope to watch the back of my tongue during swallowing. I am seeing a speech therapist, who’s giving me exercises to strengthen my tongue so it performs its job effectively. The ENT doctor found that the back of my tongue isn’t strong enough to create sufficient pressure in my esophagus to propel the bolus through, and also found that it has choreiform movement. That means that it doesn’t assemble the bolus the way it should, so food stays in my mouth longer than normal. She suggested that it could be a symptom of Huntington’s Disease (genetic testing has shown that to be unlikely). So, without adequate pressure in my esophagus, I have to swallow more than once to achieve the pressure. Of course, then the bolus comes to the area of esophageal dysmotility, and starts and stops until it eventually gets to the door to my stomach. Usually it opens, but occasionally it opens at the wrong time, and a little gastric content sneaks up into my esophagus, which is called silent reflux. Yesterday, eating lunch took 50 minutes. First, chew and chew and chew, then gather it together to form a bolus, then comes the slow process of moving the bolus through the esophagus into the stomach. What a pain!

Now, having said all that, I wonder if you’ve seen any progress in your swallowing issues. Brie, I’ve learned a lot of medical things over the years, and, like you, I push for explanations if I don’t understand completely. I also know enough by now that I understand more of what they say, and most of my doctors have figured out that I don’t want them to dumb down what they say. I just return their dumbed down comments with intelligent responses using technical terms. If a doctor doesn’t work with me, I move on to a better one. I guess I’m old enough that I can move on if I want to. I’ve assembled a pretty good team of doctors who care for me. The neurologist has been a challenge because his nature is not very outgoing, and I have to draw things out of him. My wife isn’t impressed, but I see the potential. He did do one thing that was in his favor, suggesting that I get another opinion, which led me to a good pain specialist.

I was skeptical about seeing a speech therapist, but I’ve been impressed with her, and she’s explained a lot and moved me along to appropriate tests. She does way more than help kids with speech issues.

Anyway, things are moving forward, maybe at a slower pace than I’d like, but I have hope that I’ll not develop worsening symptoms.

I’m glad that you don’t have psych problems, Brie. They really can exacerbate physical problems.

Jim

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@fig827

My sister went the peg route. It was a really rough go for her. As I talk with doctors, my anxiety level spikes, thinking of all she went through when she could no longer take anything by mouth.

Jim

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@squaredancer

I was reading through this discussion, and saw that I never responded to your post back in March. How are you doing by now? Have you seen any change in your speech?

You asked about my swallowing. The speech therapist has given me a few tongue exercises, and I think they have helped. Maybe my tongue is stronger and is generating more pressure in my esophagus, so food is going through more easily. I stopped using a straw because it propels the liquid to the back of my mouth too fast, and it goes down and either starts to aspirate or hits the vocal folds. Either way, I cough and gag. I have esophageal dysmotility in the lower half, and it takes a while for the bolus to get to the bottom, especially soft breads and meat. I chew a lot, swallow twice, and wait. I often take a small drink to lubricate it so it slides on down.

Peripheral neuropathy pain is much better since I had the spinal cord stimulator implant in June. Last week the neurologist did a nerve conduction study of my hands and confirmed neuropathy there. The urologist and the ENT doctor (ear and tongue) suspect neuropathy involvement in those areas, as well.

The list seems to grow for many of us as we age.

I hope you’re doing ok.

Jim

REPLY
@jimhd

@squaredancer

I was reading through this discussion, and saw that I never responded to your post back in March. How are you doing by now? Have you seen any change in your speech?

You asked about my swallowing. The speech therapist has given me a few tongue exercises, and I think they have helped. Maybe my tongue is stronger and is generating more pressure in my esophagus, so food is going through more easily. I stopped using a straw because it propels the liquid to the back of my mouth too fast, and it goes down and either starts to aspirate or hits the vocal folds. Either way, I cough and gag. I have esophageal dysmotility in the lower half, and it takes a while for the bolus to get to the bottom, especially soft breads and meat. I chew a lot, swallow twice, and wait. I often take a small drink to lubricate it so it slides on down.

Peripheral neuropathy pain is much better since I had the spinal cord stimulator implant in June. Last week the neurologist did a nerve conduction study of my hands and confirmed neuropathy there. The urologist and the ENT doctor (ear and tongue) suspect neuropathy involvement in those areas, as well.

The list seems to grow for many of us as we age.

I hope you’re doing ok.

Jim

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Hello @jimhd .

I see you sent me 2 post. I wish I had seen it before I sent the other one.

I am glad that the doctors have finally linked some of your issues to neuropathy system.
What are they or can they do for those problems, besides pain medication?

Well, I am glad you have learned how to get some kinds of food down.to your stomach.

I had to learn all different kinds of methods to do the same thing until 2014 when I lost all swallowing capabilities.
As I said before, I finally accepted the fact that I wasn’t going to get enough nourishment eating orally and had my first feeding tube.
I only used it part time. I have been struggling for years losing capabilities of oral eating. I had to keep deleting items that I love.
But when you’re as active as I was all those years and needed the energy I had to do something. So I was doing both feeding tube and oral eating. That twas giving me the energy I needed.
The nutritionist has me on a very high cal formula. So what I was still lacking in calorie input by oral eating, I was getting it from tube feedings.

So perhaps I was getting use to tube feedings so when the time came and I could no longer eat orally I had no issues with it all.
Sure you have to give up all the foods you like to eat because of the taste, but that’s all in your mind.

But ,if you haven’t been told this by your speech pathologist, I am going to tell you right now.
You are playing Russian roulette every time you eat right now and taken the chance of a fatal aspiration event.
I was told this for many years by my speech pathologist, but she always said I knew how to deal with it.
But she always warn me that there will be a time when you will not be able to stop an aspiration event and it will kill you.
So when it got to the point when I could even get my milk soaked rice krispies or my soft poached eggs down I knew it was time to quit playing the Russian roulette game and go full time on the feeding tube.
People make a bigger issue out of using a feeding tube then what is necessary.

So my advice for anyone in this situation to get a feeding tube now and get use to it .
I have had one for almost 10 years now and it has become a part of me and it ‘s no big deal.
And full time on it since 2014.
Yes there can be some inconveniences at the beginning with scheduling the feedings but eventually one figures it all out.
I like doing my overnight feeding using a feeding pump, then I only have to do one during the daytime.
Using the pump allows you to adjust the flow rate to your needs, verse the gravity feeding.
When you wake up your all set to go.
Also using the pump at a slower rate verse the gravity feeding, allows you to maintain weight better.

I am still physically active and until I had these hearing issues I was square dancing and round dancing 4 or 5 nights a week.
I was traveling to different Dance conventions all over the U.S. Traveling by plane or land.
Now I am just traveling around the country to different doctors.
But when I getting my hearing back, next year I plan on going to different dance conventions again.

Well I could go on about this topic, but it ‘s time for my medications and I’m getting very tired.

Take care Jim.
Hope to hear from you soon.

GOD BLESS,

Tim

REPLY
@jimhd

@squaredancer

I was reading through this discussion, and saw that I never responded to your post back in March. How are you doing by now? Have you seen any change in your speech?

You asked about my swallowing. The speech therapist has given me a few tongue exercises, and I think they have helped. Maybe my tongue is stronger and is generating more pressure in my esophagus, so food is going through more easily. I stopped using a straw because it propels the liquid to the back of my mouth too fast, and it goes down and either starts to aspirate or hits the vocal folds. Either way, I cough and gag. I have esophageal dysmotility in the lower half, and it takes a while for the bolus to get to the bottom, especially soft breads and meat. I chew a lot, swallow twice, and wait. I often take a small drink to lubricate it so it slides on down.

Peripheral neuropathy pain is much better since I had the spinal cord stimulator implant in June. Last week the neurologist did a nerve conduction study of my hands and confirmed neuropathy there. The urologist and the ENT doctor (ear and tongue) suspect neuropathy involvement in those areas, as well.

The list seems to grow for many of us as we age.

I hope you’re doing ok.

Jim

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Tim @squaredancer – Thanks for your input.

I spoke with the neurologist this week, and I don’t really know understand exactly everything I heard. He spoke of two kinds of neuropathy. The biopsy of my leg shows small fiber neuropathy. He also said there’s some deterioration of the myelin, which is a sheath around the axon of some nerve cells, insulating it. It’s essential for the functioning of the nervous system. I’m not sure if that was found in my hands or my head. He did a nerve conduction study of my hands and a test to determine how well messages get from my auditory nerve to my brain. It was normal to the brain, but decreased to the brain stem. I don’t know what that means.

The next step is to see a neuro specialist at OHSU (Oregon Health Science University) in Portland. I have episodes of dizziness – vertigo – and coinciding with the dizziness is a loud buzzing behind my eyes that sounds like thousands of crickets. I hope to find out what that’s about, and also more about the connection between neuropathy and my swallowing problems.

My middle sister died a few years ago, and after seeing every doctor at Stanford, never had a diagnosis of what was causing all of her problems. One of the first presenting symptoms was problems with swallowing. So, it probably causes more concern for me, having watched my sister slowly die. I don’t know if she ever used a pump, but she did have a feeding tube her last year or so.

Do you have a specific diagnosis as to what caused your loss of ability to swallow? I haven’t heard any mention of a cause for my dysmotility. Knowing why it started would help me live with it better, I think. That’s one of my idiosyncrasies. I want to know all I can about things, so I like Google. I can look everything up anytime I want to. My wife thinks I’m too obsessive. She connects my curiosity with worrying, which is sometimes true, but not always. If something is wrong, I want to know why and what it is and what the outcome might be and what treatments are required and on and on.

I don’t think a feeding tube is in my near future. At this point, swallowing issues are just a nuisance. I’m careful with liquids, and I just take my time chewing and swallowing.

I have to stop and head for bed. I hope your hearing problems are resolved soon. I hope never to lose my hearing. I’m a pianist, and music has been my life. I was reminded of something when you wrote about dancing. I went to college in Springfield, Missouri, and sometimes on Saturday nights we’d drive to the little town of Ozark. In a vacant building on the town square, there was always square dancing, with a fiddle, a bass and a guitar. That was a long time ago, in the early 70s, so memory is a little sketchy. There might have been more musicians, but there always was a crowd. I have never learned to dance, so I just enjoyed it at a distance.

We can talk more another day.

Jim

REPLY

Hello Jim, @jimhd

I agree with you that curiosity and research can be confused with worry – it is sometimes hard to decide the motivation.

I’m glad to hear that you are getting some answers to some of your problems. The swallowing problem can be difficult to sort out. My swallowing problem has been caused by Parkinson’s and also a paralyzed vocal cord, which was corrected some with surgery. I have been told that turning my head and looking down will help when I swallow. Also, holding your breath when you swallow liquids has been known to help with some swallowing problems. I’m not sure that these techniques work for all swallowing problems – but you can certainly give them a try.

As I recall you also saw a speech therapist. Was that helpful?

Teresa

REPLY
@jimhd

@squaredancer

I was reading through this discussion, and saw that I never responded to your post back in March. How are you doing by now? Have you seen any change in your speech?

You asked about my swallowing. The speech therapist has given me a few tongue exercises, and I think they have helped. Maybe my tongue is stronger and is generating more pressure in my esophagus, so food is going through more easily. I stopped using a straw because it propels the liquid to the back of my mouth too fast, and it goes down and either starts to aspirate or hits the vocal folds. Either way, I cough and gag. I have esophageal dysmotility in the lower half, and it takes a while for the bolus to get to the bottom, especially soft breads and meat. I chew a lot, swallow twice, and wait. I often take a small drink to lubricate it so it slides on down.

Peripheral neuropathy pain is much better since I had the spinal cord stimulator implant in June. Last week the neurologist did a nerve conduction study of my hands and confirmed neuropathy there. The urologist and the ENT doctor (ear and tongue) suspect neuropathy involvement in those areas, as well.

The list seems to grow for many of us as we age.

I hope you’re doing ok.

Jim

Jump to this post

Jim, when my father was having problems swallowing he was referred to a speech therapist. It helped tremendously. Have you been to speech therapy for your problem? Also, I’m curious if you wear dentures. My dad’s never seemed to fit properly as he was in his 80’s and 90’s. He died at 93. I have always wondered if that was part of his swallowing issues. He did get his dentures refitted often, but it never seemed to help.

I certainly hope you find the root cause of these problems as you’ve had many physical problems to deal with. I too am a researcher on my physical and mental health issues as well as all the medications I have been prescribed. My husband thinks I worry too much as well. I am just different from him I think. He ignores his health problems until they become major and finally he goes to the doctor. The doctor tells him the same things I have been telling or recommending for months. He takes action when the doc tells him, but not when I do. Actually I’ve been changing to telling him to see the doc when he’s got something going on since he listens to them. Often I feel like he won’t take action BECAUSE I said it’s something he needs to pay attention to. Lately he’s been better about this I think his doc has confirmed my “diagnoses” so often. Anyway, I do enjoy learning about many things on Google, being careful to go to reputable sites for information.

By the way, I have begun tapering off my blood pressure medication due to having so many dizzy spells and balance problems. My BP has often been 100/60, sometimes even lower! So, my PCP decided to cut my medicine by half. Then because I was still having low BP and dizzy spells, I cut it in half again. At my endocrinologist appointment last week my BP was 115/74, so he said to keep weaning off and see how things go. Since I’m retired now, I am under much less stress, and I lost 85 pounds 3.5 yrs ago, so I think those things have allowed me to experience a normal BP, even with T2 diabetes. I am taking a pill every other day now and next week will stop altogether.

In addition, I am tapering off my Tramadol 50mg that I was taking 4 times every 24 hrs for nearly a year for pain. This is my last pain medication and I’m so happy to be getting off it. I am down to 2 per 24 hrs now, and will stop completely in about a week. I no longer have the pain in my right sciatic nerve, hip, thigh, calf, and foot that i have had for 1.5 yrs. I have been doing ART, and it has totally worked! I am so relieved to be able to walk and go up and down steps without excruciating pain. I have a ton of energy now and I am beginning to do many of my former activities which is a joy for me. Good news that I can actually get better rather than continue to deteriorate in health. I am being careful not to overdo it as I don’t want to reinjure myself. Best of luck to you Jim.

Thanks, Gail B

REPLY
@jimhd

@squaredancer

I was reading through this discussion, and saw that I never responded to your post back in March. How are you doing by now? Have you seen any change in your speech?

You asked about my swallowing. The speech therapist has given me a few tongue exercises, and I think they have helped. Maybe my tongue is stronger and is generating more pressure in my esophagus, so food is going through more easily. I stopped using a straw because it propels the liquid to the back of my mouth too fast, and it goes down and either starts to aspirate or hits the vocal folds. Either way, I cough and gag. I have esophageal dysmotility in the lower half, and it takes a while for the bolus to get to the bottom, especially soft breads and meat. I chew a lot, swallow twice, and wait. I often take a small drink to lubricate it so it slides on down.

Peripheral neuropathy pain is much better since I had the spinal cord stimulator implant in June. Last week the neurologist did a nerve conduction study of my hands and confirmed neuropathy there. The urologist and the ENT doctor (ear and tongue) suspect neuropathy involvement in those areas, as well.

The list seems to grow for many of us as we age.

I hope you’re doing ok.

Jim

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@gailb

It sounds like you are doing much better – congratulations on your progress!

Is there any one thing that you could share that might have contributed to your improvement?

Teresa

REPLY
@jimhd

@squaredancer

I was reading through this discussion, and saw that I never responded to your post back in March. How are you doing by now? Have you seen any change in your speech?

You asked about my swallowing. The speech therapist has given me a few tongue exercises, and I think they have helped. Maybe my tongue is stronger and is generating more pressure in my esophagus, so food is going through more easily. I stopped using a straw because it propels the liquid to the back of my mouth too fast, and it goes down and either starts to aspirate or hits the vocal folds. Either way, I cough and gag. I have esophageal dysmotility in the lower half, and it takes a while for the bolus to get to the bottom, especially soft breads and meat. I chew a lot, swallow twice, and wait. I often take a small drink to lubricate it so it slides on down.

Peripheral neuropathy pain is much better since I had the spinal cord stimulator implant in June. Last week the neurologist did a nerve conduction study of my hands and confirmed neuropathy there. The urologist and the ENT doctor (ear and tongue) suspect neuropathy involvement in those areas, as well.

The list seems to grow for many of us as we age.

I hope you’re doing ok.

Jim

Jump to this post

Yes, actually 2 things. First, I was not willing to concede to a continuous downhill level of health. There are many things I still want to do that require robust health.

Second, going to get ART therapy when PT didn’t work. I read about Active Release Technique on Connect, and decided to try it. I was amazed what releasing the muscles and nerves did for my pain right away. I continued for monthly sessions once a month for 3 months after the initial 6 sessions. I highly recommend it. Thanks for asking.
Gail B

REPLY
@hopeful33250

Hello Jim, @jimhd

I agree with you that curiosity and research can be confused with worry – it is sometimes hard to decide the motivation.

I’m glad to hear that you are getting some answers to some of your problems. The swallowing problem can be difficult to sort out. My swallowing problem has been caused by Parkinson’s and also a paralyzed vocal cord, which was corrected some with surgery. I have been told that turning my head and looking down will help when I swallow. Also, holding your breath when you swallow liquids has been known to help with some swallowing problems. I’m not sure that these techniques work for all swallowing problems – but you can certainly give them a try.

As I recall you also saw a speech therapist. Was that helpful?

Teresa

Jump to this post

Yes, Teresa @hopeful33250 – it does help to hold my breath when drinking liquid. I’m working on taking sips instead of guzzling. I’ve found that swallowing is a bit better since starting the exercises, though certain foods do require extra effort to get them all the way to my stomach. Tim @squaredancer has been helpful with knowing what to watch for, especially as far as risky eating is concerned. Weird. I never thought of eating as a risky behavior. Lol.

I’m finding that many of my problems are likely associated with neuropathy. I think that, for the most part, progression is relatively slow, which eases my anxiety level somewhat.

How long have you had Parkinson’s, Teresa? That’s another disease that might progress slowly, as well, though I’ve known people at both ends of the spectrum. You appear to take things in stride. I imagine, though, that you carry some level of anxiety. I know the challenges that anxiety, as well as the various diseases themselves, presents. I pray that the Lord will give you the strength you need for each day.

Jim

REPLY
@jimhd

@squaredancer

I was reading through this discussion, and saw that I never responded to your post back in March. How are you doing by now? Have you seen any change in your speech?

You asked about my swallowing. The speech therapist has given me a few tongue exercises, and I think they have helped. Maybe my tongue is stronger and is generating more pressure in my esophagus, so food is going through more easily. I stopped using a straw because it propels the liquid to the back of my mouth too fast, and it goes down and either starts to aspirate or hits the vocal folds. Either way, I cough and gag. I have esophageal dysmotility in the lower half, and it takes a while for the bolus to get to the bottom, especially soft breads and meat. I chew a lot, swallow twice, and wait. I often take a small drink to lubricate it so it slides on down.

Peripheral neuropathy pain is much better since I had the spinal cord stimulator implant in June. Last week the neurologist did a nerve conduction study of my hands and confirmed neuropathy there. The urologist and the ENT doctor (ear and tongue) suspect neuropathy involvement in those areas, as well.

The list seems to grow for many of us as we age.

I hope you’re doing ok.

Jim

Jump to this post

@gailb

I’m glad to hear that your attitude and ART therapy was so helpful!

Teresa

REPLY
@jimhd

@squaredancer

I was reading through this discussion, and saw that I never responded to your post back in March. How are you doing by now? Have you seen any change in your speech?

You asked about my swallowing. The speech therapist has given me a few tongue exercises, and I think they have helped. Maybe my tongue is stronger and is generating more pressure in my esophagus, so food is going through more easily. I stopped using a straw because it propels the liquid to the back of my mouth too fast, and it goes down and either starts to aspirate or hits the vocal folds. Either way, I cough and gag. I have esophageal dysmotility in the lower half, and it takes a while for the bolus to get to the bottom, especially soft breads and meat. I chew a lot, swallow twice, and wait. I often take a small drink to lubricate it so it slides on down.

Peripheral neuropathy pain is much better since I had the spinal cord stimulator implant in June. Last week the neurologist did a nerve conduction study of my hands and confirmed neuropathy there. The urologist and the ENT doctor (ear and tongue) suspect neuropathy involvement in those areas, as well.

The list seems to grow for many of us as we age.

I hope you’re doing ok.

Jim

Jump to this post

Hi, Gail @gailb – I’ve been working with a speech therapist for a couple of months, and I think the exercises she’s given me have helped. I don’t have dentures, still original equipment. When I was 50, I had braces at the same time as our young daughter, and I wear a retainer every Saturday night.

Jim

REPLY
@jimhd

@squaredancer

I was reading through this discussion, and saw that I never responded to your post back in March. How are you doing by now? Have you seen any change in your speech?

You asked about my swallowing. The speech therapist has given me a few tongue exercises, and I think they have helped. Maybe my tongue is stronger and is generating more pressure in my esophagus, so food is going through more easily. I stopped using a straw because it propels the liquid to the back of my mouth too fast, and it goes down and either starts to aspirate or hits the vocal folds. Either way, I cough and gag. I have esophageal dysmotility in the lower half, and it takes a while for the bolus to get to the bottom, especially soft breads and meat. I chew a lot, swallow twice, and wait. I often take a small drink to lubricate it so it slides on down.

Peripheral neuropathy pain is much better since I had the spinal cord stimulator implant in June. Last week the neurologist did a nerve conduction study of my hands and confirmed neuropathy there. The urologist and the ENT doctor (ear and tongue) suspect neuropathy involvement in those areas, as well.

The list seems to grow for many of us as we age.

I hope you’re doing ok.

Jim

Jump to this post

Great to hear you’re seeing a speech therapist. Also great that you still have your own teeth. I was wondering if dentures might have an effect on swallowing, but apparently not. Best of luck Jim.

REPLY
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