Dry Needling or acupuncture

Posted by judypall @judypall, Mar 22, 2019

Has anyone had any luck with either dry needling or acupuncture. I have tried each of them one time. But made my feet tingle more. The PT who was administering the dry needling said that it goes through a cycle of pain to get better. I wasn’t too sure on that. Anyone?

@jetsetter

I am doing PT now for neck pain. They have done dry needling twice, only prescribed once a week. They used only 4 needles in my shoulder neck are and only left them in for 6 minutes.

Can anyone else tell me how long the needles we’re left in and how many needles they used on your pain area?

At another PT provider 2 years ago, they used dry needling for neck pain on the other side (finally went away) and added about 12 needles and then attached TENS machine stimulus to the needles.

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I've had acupuncture where they attach the TENS machine to the needles and leave them for awhile. However, dry needling done by a PT who is also a sr instructor for dry needling is a different technique. The needle is used quickly in and out a few times palpitating the trigger point.

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@amandajro

Hello and welcome, @teslachan. Thank you for joining the conversation to share with others what you have found to be helpful in dealing with your symptoms. It will be interesting to see if you get any feedback at your MRI appointment to learn why this is working for you.

Can I ask how you came across dry needling as an alternative option?

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Hi Amanda, Thank you for the welcome! Dry needling was suggested to me by my primary care physician. She had other patients who had good success with relief from chronic neurologic pain using dry needling.
My understanding of why it works for me is that chronic nerve pain can cause us to tense up, causing muscles to spasm, which then release only part way leaving knots of tension. The dry needling targets those knots and causes them to loosen, which also can release muscle tension in other connected areas.

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@greenacres

I've had both acupuncture and dry needling for my neck pain and pain due to mild scoliosis and found it helpful in both cases but is also dependent upon the skills of the practitioner.

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Thank you for sharing your experience. I’m sure the skill of the practitioner is critical.

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@teslachan

Hi Amanda, Thank you for the welcome! Dry needling was suggested to me by my primary care physician. She had other patients who had good success with relief from chronic neurologic pain using dry needling.
My understanding of why it works for me is that chronic nerve pain can cause us to tense up, causing muscles to spasm, which then release only part way leaving knots of tension. The dry needling targets those knots and causes them to loosen, which also can release muscle tension in other connected areas.

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Thank you, I have the same issues as my body compensates for the “pain in the neck”, it creates muscle tension in the shoulder/scapula.

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