Does anyone find that a type of shoe helps your foot neuropathy?

Posted by lorirenee1 @lorirenee1, Mar 25, 2019

I am on a constant quest for shoes that don’t kill my feet due to the neuropathy. I find that Spencos and Wolky shoes seem the best. Are there any other suggestions? Shoes can be just crippling for me. Horrid.

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@lisalucier

Thanks for the suggestion on the moccasin type shoe, @robschweiger. Do you feel the type of sole is what is making the most impact with helping the neuropathy in your feet, or some other component of that shoe?

@jeffrapp – also interested in what you have found with the particular soles in your boots that seems to help delay the onset of burning? Fur, support offered, or something else?

@pfbacon – do you find that softness inside of your shoes – through the shoe design itself or added insoles – is the key to keeping your feet the least painful?

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I have several pairs of Ugg shoes and boots, I find that the shearling insole liners and lining of the uppers delay the onset of burning which I experience when wearing regular shoes. I have even ordered shearling insoles from Ugg and other manufacturers, and scrap pieces of shearling (cheaper) to make my own liners.
It's not a miracle, but it helps.
I feel best when I can walk around barefoot, which is problematic in the winter.
Interestingly, I also feel better when the sun is out. Has anyone else noticed this?

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I look for soft inside and soft outside too. The squishy shoes that give runners good rebound are my favorites (Skechers Goga Mat is one of them). Peggy

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@lorirenee1

Your neuropathy symptoms are directly related to your diabetes and sugar intake. If you control your carbs very closely, eat little of them, your feet symptoms will probably lessen naturally. Diabetes is the number one cause of neuropathy. Control sugar, and you will control neuropathy. I am not diabetic. My neuro doc is still trying to figure out why I have it. I had a lumpectomy a year ago, and within 3 weeks after surgery, it started. All of this is not much fun, that is for sure. By the way, to change to a happy topic…I saw you taught English lit. I taught English as a Second Language, but I belong to a book club and like reading a lot. However, I do read in spurts. The ladies in my book club have been meeting for at least 20 years. We are all retired teachers and aides, and we spend more time chatting than discussing books. We are so bad!!!! We love eachother a lot, needless to say! Anyway, good luck with those feet. Neuropathy hurts a lot. Keep in touch…..Lori R.

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My sugars are in excellent control but neuropathy isn’t, please don’t make judgments that hurt.

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I hope I am not upsetting anyone with my concern about neuropathy. My neurologist thinks it is nerve damage from surgery as it only affects one side. She tested my big toe and said nothing can be done. I exercise anyway and try not to sit very long during the day. I only have it occasionally so I don't take anything for it. I know very little about the subject and am careful to not make statements about the cause. I am finding that I don't know nearly enough about diabetes, either, as it fluctuates, in my case. My endocrinologist dismissed me and my family doctor says nothing at all when he sees me, which may be only once a year. He leaves it to me to manage the diabetes. That is why I need to be on the website. I try to learn every day to stay ahead of problems. Thanks to everyone for their support. Dorisena

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@dorisena

I hope I am not upsetting anyone with my concern about neuropathy. My neurologist thinks it is nerve damage from surgery as it only affects one side. She tested my big toe and said nothing can be done. I exercise anyway and try not to sit very long during the day. I only have it occasionally so I don't take anything for it. I know very little about the subject and am careful to not make statements about the cause. I am finding that I don't know nearly enough about diabetes, either, as it fluctuates, in my case. My endocrinologist dismissed me and my family doctor says nothing at all when he sees me, which may be only once a year. He leaves it to me to manage the diabetes. That is why I need to be on the website. I try to learn every day to stay ahead of problems. Thanks to everyone for their support. Dorisena

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Hi Dorisena @dorisena — You are your best advocate for your health and you are doing what you need to be doing to help yourself – learning as much as you can about any health condition you have. That way we can learn to ask better questions with our doctors and health care providers to help us get the best possible treatment. You may want to join in on the following discussion and meet other members with similar health symptoms and find out what they are doing for treatments.

As one that has small fiber peripheral neuropathy I can understand your concern about neuropathy. You are doing great to keep exercising. Do you have pain with your toe with neuropathy? Also, what is your biggest challenge? Is it managing your diabetes?

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I really haven't suffered managing my diabetes, John, except in social settings. I think it is rude to not consider the needs of people when serving food to a group, especially in church settings. I have left two churches partially because of this inconsiderate behavior. I am serious about managing my diabetes and many people my age are not, and they don't encourage my good behavior. It would be nice to have respectful support. With the neuropathy I had a little at the beginning of my diabetes treatment, and my doctor never said a word about my complaints. So I exercised and that went away and has not returned.
My recent neuropathy and cold feet is possibly from spinal surgery, as I am still slightly handicapped after three years, but I do not used a walker. That doctor recommended nothing. Yes, my toe hurts once in a while, and my replaced knees hurt sometimes, however I was pain free from that for a few years. I am thinking arthritis has returned to the area somewhat. My ankles were hurting, but that has stopped. Getting my blood pressure to improve has been a big challenge as I can't tolerate all the pill side effects, but I changed church membership and left some social problems behind. I am happier now. Dorisena

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@dorisena

I really haven't suffered managing my diabetes, John, except in social settings. I think it is rude to not consider the needs of people when serving food to a group, especially in church settings. I have left two churches partially because of this inconsiderate behavior. I am serious about managing my diabetes and many people my age are not, and they don't encourage my good behavior. It would be nice to have respectful support. With the neuropathy I had a little at the beginning of my diabetes treatment, and my doctor never said a word about my complaints. So I exercised and that went away and has not returned.
My recent neuropathy and cold feet is possibly from spinal surgery, as I am still slightly handicapped after three years, but I do not used a walker. That doctor recommended nothing. Yes, my toe hurts once in a while, and my replaced knees hurt sometimes, however I was pain free from that for a few years. I am thinking arthritis has returned to the area somewhat. My ankles were hurting, but that has stopped. Getting my blood pressure to improve has been a big challenge as I can't tolerate all the pill side effects, but I changed church membership and left some social problems behind. I am happier now. Dorisena

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Hi @dorisena. I agree, it is difficult to manage diabetes in a social setting. I hear my mother who has diabetes say that others are always persuading her to eat. They tell her they eat what they want and are fine. My mother is now 89 years old. I tell her it is NOT a good idea to eat whatever and load up on sugars. Taking insulin should not be the ultimate solution for diabetes type II. Those people are taking the easy way out but little do they know they may be causing more harm to their health in the long run. There may be a spike in blood sugars until the insulin is taken. During that time the blood may not circulate as well to the tiny blood vessels. People I know that control their diabetes through diet and exercise only (no medications) do not seem to have neuropathy issues, like my mother. I always tell my mother that she is the one that has to deal with the pains and aches not them and to listen to her body. I think it is harder to control diabetes through diet and exercise. Weight loss may help too. It takes a lot of discipline so good for you for trying to achieve better health, after all, we have to deal with the choices we make. Have you been diagnosed with neuropathy in your toe? You mentioned you may have an increase in arthritis. Is perhaps gout a possibility? I know that it can be painful when a flare up occurs. Eating cherries or drinking cherry juice is very helpful to my uncle when he gets a flare up. He does not have diabetes.

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@avmcbellar

Hi @dorisena. I agree, it is difficult to manage diabetes in a social setting. I hear my mother who has diabetes say that others are always persuading her to eat. They tell her they eat what they want and are fine. My mother is now 89 years old. I tell her it is NOT a good idea to eat whatever and load up on sugars. Taking insulin should not be the ultimate solution for diabetes type II. Those people are taking the easy way out but little do they know they may be causing more harm to their health in the long run. There may be a spike in blood sugars until the insulin is taken. During that time the blood may not circulate as well to the tiny blood vessels. People I know that control their diabetes through diet and exercise only (no medications) do not seem to have neuropathy issues, like my mother. I always tell my mother that she is the one that has to deal with the pains and aches not them and to listen to her body. I think it is harder to control diabetes through diet and exercise. Weight loss may help too. It takes a lot of discipline so good for you for trying to achieve better health, after all, we have to deal with the choices we make. Have you been diagnosed with neuropathy in your toe? You mentioned you may have an increase in arthritis. Is perhaps gout a possibility? I know that it can be painful when a flare up occurs. Eating cherries or drinking cherry juice is very helpful to my uncle when he gets a flare up. He does not have diabetes.

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The only thing that helped my arthritis before I went into diabetes was giving up sugar. I could really feel the improvement when I would stop the home made ice cream and carrot cake, heavily iced. When I gave up all sugar with diabetes, I couldn't decide what helps improve arthritis anymore. No, I have studied gout and know that I did not have that problem because I ate too well for that. When the doctor prescribed metformin and the endocrinologist said two pills instead of one at night, I thought that was to carry me through to morning, but apparently that is not the case. My son and I argue over when to take the pills, and I do better with the numbers than he.
In the summer I eat too much fruit and enjoy a cold dinner. The homemade ice cream last night did a number on me, for sure. I will send the rest to my family next door. I think I need to give up so much sweetener because I read it fools your body. I would rather discipline myself with eating than resort to insulin shots. They sent insulin home with my husband and said to give it when his blood sugar reached 200. He ignored that and continued his overeating. I had to throw the shots out. He didn't test. He thought he knew better than the doctors. Most obstinate man I ever knew and I lived with him 50 years until he died. That experience motivates me well to behave.
My goal was to give up the Metformin, but I am not reaching that goal. I am thankful for everyone's support. Dorisena

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Lest anyone think I was cooking too much for a diabetic husband, that was not the case. I cooked a heavier meal for him and more veggies for me. He did eat the vegetables, but not chicken. I stopped baking, or sent the baking to my family, which he could smell and that made him angry. I only baked All Bran muffins, which were good for everyone. So he would leave after dinner saying he needed something and go to the store and buy candy. He also became obsessed with restaurant eating and stopping at drive-thru's, and skipped home dinners at night because he said he had board meetings to attend. I could do nothing about the eating problem and he treated me with contempt. He said I wouldn't do what he wanted. It was the dementia working on him, as well. Dorisena

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I haven't eaten sugar since 1987 and I don't miss it. I had to formulate a circle of people that I could go to to get real help, comfort, advice, encouragement, entertainment, and go on adventures with, instead of zoning out with sugar whenever I had a feeling or a 'want' that wasn't immediately satisfied. My life is so technicolor with all these people! I have to give back to them of course – and it is a pleasure to do my part in my group – they can count on me and I can count on them. There was some trial and error in gathering 'my circle', and it changes from time to time as people move away or die but it's just part of life. I get to live this normal life instead of stuffing with sugar — a good trade I think! It doesn't matter what other people eat, I give myself food today and it makes me wake up feeling good tomorrow. Sugar gives my tongue a splendid sensation for a few seconds, then it deforms the rest of my body, I would wake up not feeling the 'zest for life' that I have come to enjoy. Peggy

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@dorisena

The only thing that helped my arthritis before I went into diabetes was giving up sugar. I could really feel the improvement when I would stop the home made ice cream and carrot cake, heavily iced. When I gave up all sugar with diabetes, I couldn't decide what helps improve arthritis anymore. No, I have studied gout and know that I did not have that problem because I ate too well for that. When the doctor prescribed metformin and the endocrinologist said two pills instead of one at night, I thought that was to carry me through to morning, but apparently that is not the case. My son and I argue over when to take the pills, and I do better with the numbers than he.
In the summer I eat too much fruit and enjoy a cold dinner. The homemade ice cream last night did a number on me, for sure. I will send the rest to my family next door. I think I need to give up so much sweetener because I read it fools your body. I would rather discipline myself with eating than resort to insulin shots. They sent insulin home with my husband and said to give it when his blood sugar reached 200. He ignored that and continued his overeating. I had to throw the shots out. He didn't test. He thought he knew better than the doctors. Most obstinate man I ever knew and I lived with him 50 years until he died. That experience motivates me well to behave.
My goal was to give up the Metformin, but I am not reaching that goal. I am thankful for everyone's support. Dorisena

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Hi @dorisena, sugar is addictive and can cause inflammation. I tell my mother it is ok for her to eat a small amount of fruit. It is better than not having any at all to cause her to binge. She plans her meals and knows her limits for starchy, sugary foods. She picks what she wants to eat throughout the day and sticks to it. She too does not want to self test and inject so she is cautious. I have told her the risks associated with the disease. The HgA1C is the blood test most physicians use to determine the blood sugar level for the past three months. Diet and exercise may lower the HgA1C level and eventually eliminate the need for the oral diabetic medications, your doctor will decide that. I have seen that happen with my mother’s friend with diabetes. Once I had eliminated all sweets including fruit from my diet for two weeks. At the end of those two weeks I did not crave anything sweet. I felt good. People couldn’t believe all the foods I passed up. I later slowly reintroduced fruits back into my diet again. I reset my sweet intake so not to over eat. I was ready to do that with my diet because I cared about my health. You may want to research turmeric for its benefits. I also take turmeric for its many beneficial properties including inflammation and pain. Sounds like you are trying and will eventually meet your goals when you are ready to make that commitment. You can do it!

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I have been working on my diabetes for 12 years now and am somewhat limited by my ability to exercise enough due to the back surgery. I agree that my biggest problem is lack of social support and encouragement. I have left the third church now during these years partially because of the social problem with eating well. Old folks think eating should be a career for them, and they are ignorant about their health. I think I am in a younger church group now and am going to volunteer with them this week. I sent the homemade ice cream home with my granddaughter. Taking it easy because of my fractured shoulder has not been good, but I feel like I can do more now and my blood pressure is lower. I am determined to solve the isolation from living in the country which I love dearly but can't travel much right now. I am a happier camper, for sure. Thanks for the support, Dorisena

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I know a diabetic fellow who eats nothing but pie – he juggles the insulin to balance it. He doesn't always get it right, he ends up in the hospital sometimes. He's overweight and has some diseases caused by malnutrition and obesity. His doctors have given him the medical diet for diabetics, it's similar to my diet for hypoglycemia, but they can't make him eat it. He suffers a lot. I don't want to suffer like him. I have friends who are hypoglycemic too – they eat sugar sometimes and they get sick as dogs. I don't want to suffer like them either. The medical diet is the best of the options I have. Anyone else can do what they think is best for them … Peggy

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@zorrospouse

My sugars are in excellent control but neuropathy isn’t, please don’t make judgments that hurt.

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Hello, @zorrospouse – just wanted to welcome you to Mayo Clinic Connect. That's great your sugars are in excellent control, and that's unfortunate that your neuropathy is not. Will you share more about the symptoms you're experiencing? Assuming you are experiencing symptoms in your feet, what have you found helps you as far as footwear?

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@lisalucier

Hello, @zorrospouse – just wanted to welcome you to Mayo Clinic Connect. That's great your sugars are in excellent control, and that's unfortunate that your neuropathy is not. Will you share more about the symptoms you're experiencing? Assuming you are experiencing symptoms in your feet, what have you found helps you as far as footwear?

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Was advised no more sandals but have difficulty bending due to back issues so am hoping to get help finding slipons that will give more support. Have spinal stenosis along with the neuropathies. Foot numbness, pain, and weakness.

Liked by Lisa Lucier

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