Diabetes Questions

Posted by rpdelectronics @rpdelectronics, Dec 7, 2022

Hello all,
I am new to this forum and getting information about diabetes. I was not aware that I had diabetes until my doctor said that I had it. I had a
doctor that wasn't very serious about it. Now I have a new doctor who takes it seriously.
I have had low blood sugar issues when I was a child. The docs prescribed pancreatin and had me eat cashews. Now they say that I have high blood sugar.
I have some questions. How do you know if u are type 1 or type 2 diabetic? I am not able to prick my finger to draw blood to get enough blood to measure it. The doc got my a Libre2 which is easy to use and read the levels.
What glucose levels are a problem? The Libre shows 70 – 180 as in target. My readings start 130 in the am then crawl up. When I eat shoots up to 350 and flat tops. They give me Metformin and Glypicide. What are these meds for? If you take them they lower blood sugar some, but I found it drops some if you do nothing

I found that if I do not eat macaroni and cheese that it tends to stay lower. I eat at a deli often. I am vegatarian although I will eat cheese. If I eat at a church potluck that it will go up near 350.
I am still watching it. I had tingle in my feet at times. Lately better. My doc had me get new shoes so I got Masons. I wear 10-1/2 A and they were out of A but sold me a B that seems to work. They have me on 500 mG metformin and 5 mG I take it after eating then it drops some. They had me take the meds again in the afternoon.
I need to get a log book to record what is going on.
What if you eat it. How long is it supposed to change your blood sugar? I could ask my doc but often busy.
Sometimes when I put a new sensor on it goes up higher and later stabilizes down. I like having the Libre as it is helping. I like my doctor. He does well. I also have someone that tells me adjustments to foods from the Medicare provider. i get information from several people and it takes awhile to sort it out.
Some tell me not to eat much potatos, others say to take them primarily and to use salt. Taco Bell has fiesta vegie burrito and Veggie Power Bowel.
I would appreciate some answers from those who know. Please do not post if you're guessing. Thank you all. Blessings

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Diabetes & Endocrine System Support Group.

@rpdelectronics, welcome to the support groups.

I have had type 2 diabetes for many years and many years nursing experience but this is not medical advice per se, just information as I know it (from personal experience) and a couple of suggestions.

The difference between type one and type two is mainly that one is from childhood and two is adult onset.

There is lots of diabetes info on the Mayo website telling you what normal levels are for non-diabetics as well as diabetics and what medications are generally used as well as diet suggestions.

I'm very fortunate in that my primary doctor has considerable expertise in diabetes treatment so I don't need to see an endocrinologist for now. However, it might be worth your while to consult a diabetes specialist. Maybe your regular doctor would refer you to one. If not, perhaps you can find one on your own.

Usually diabetics need to watch carbohydrate intake (macaroni, potatoes, burritos) and fats. Higher fiber intake is often encouraged. Vegetarians can fare pretty well if they limit hard cheeses and high carbs. Perhaps your doctor can give you a diabetic diet to follow or, better yet, put you in touch with a dietitian.

Wishing you well!

REPLY

@kamama94 is so right when it comes to diabetes control and food habits. I have had type 2 diabetes for many years and found that this disease requires a team of docs like a PCP, endocrinologist, and dietitian. I started using the Libre2 nearly 2 weeks ago, and you may find that it fluctuates wildly, as for me many times it did not come close to the finger stick readings. After a week it was better. To have some control over this disease requires some daily exercise as well as food changes. That is why your endocrinologist and dietitian are so important. Lastly, get your labs done at least every 3 months by your PCP to develop a trend like the Libre does for you every 2 weeks.

REPLY

You might find these two YouTube videos by Dr. Jay Wortman helpful.

— Diabetes Remission is Surprisingly Simple!: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cx6xw3wOAMc
— 'Undoing Atkins: A Cautionary Tale': https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jIegMp5cWBY

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Diabetes (any type) is a wretched thing. There is no “one size fits all cause or treatment”. It will affect all aspects of your health and all other health conditions will affect the diabetes. Everything is interrelated. In 1975 (at age 18) I was diagnosed with Type 1. I went to college & grad school, got married and had kids. The pregnancies were complicated. In 2005 (at age 48) I had a pancreas transplant. It did not “cure” the diabetes but did help me achieve good blood sugar control for the first time ever. It had a good run for about 11 years then started to show some wear and tear decrease in function. In 2016 (at age 59) I was diagnosed with Type 2. I was at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN being evaluated for Kidney transplant. Diabetes (and high blood pressure) are leading causes of kidney disease. Now in 2022 (age 65) I’m diabetic and have chronic kidney disease (CKD). I use a continual glucose monitor (CGM) Dexcom G6. I do labs required by my endocrinologist and nephrologist. I follow dietary guidelines from a dietician who has a background in diabetes and renal requirements. I try to get exercise at least several times a week. This past autumn my brother was here visiting (age 69). He has a long history of Type 2. While he was here he got very sick. I recognized the familiar signs of diabetic ketoacidosis and took him to the ER. He spent a few days in ICU and was told it is possible that he is actually Type 1 not Type 2! He is home now and working with his local provider. So my point is that no matter what kind of diabetes you have there will be necessary changes: medication, labs, monitoring, diet, exercise ….. etc to come through it well. Last but not least is my personal Christian belief. This is a necessity for my spiritual health. Whether you share this belief or not you will need some kind of support system for good emotional & mental health.

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@kamama94

@rpdelectronics, welcome to the support groups.

I have had type 2 diabetes for many years and many years nursing experience but this is not medical advice per se, just information as I know it (from personal experience) and a couple of suggestions.

The difference between type one and type two is mainly that one is from childhood and two is adult onset.

There is lots of diabetes info on the Mayo website telling you what normal levels are for non-diabetics as well as diabetics and what medications are generally used as well as diet suggestions.

I'm very fortunate in that my primary doctor has considerable expertise in diabetes treatment so I don't need to see an endocrinologist for now. However, it might be worth your while to consult a diabetes specialist. Maybe your regular doctor would refer you to one. If not, perhaps you can find one on your own.

Usually diabetics need to watch carbohydrate intake (macaroni, potatoes, burritos) and fats. Higher fiber intake is often encouraged. Vegetarians can fare pretty well if they limit hard cheeses and high carbs. Perhaps your doctor can give you a diabetic diet to follow or, better yet, put you in touch with a dietitian.

Wishing you well!

Jump to this post

Thanks for writing. I had hypoglycemia for years from age 6 and until recently. Does that make me type 1 then? I knew how to deal with that but now the doc says I have hi blood sugar and getting adjusted to it has been rough. It is easy to raise the blood sugar by eating things, but dropping it not so easy.
I have a pretty good family doc and Devoted has a monitoring program. I get confused with some of this in that my gf likes to watch your tube with a dr. McDougal. He thinks that potatoes are great for diabetics. I am not so sure. I used to eat macarone and cheese and quit that and saw that helped. I avoid cheeses. I appreciate your comments.
Thanks for the comments. Roger

REPLY
@cehunt57

Diabetes (any type) is a wretched thing. There is no “one size fits all cause or treatment”. It will affect all aspects of your health and all other health conditions will affect the diabetes. Everything is interrelated. In 1975 (at age 18) I was diagnosed with Type 1. I went to college & grad school, got married and had kids. The pregnancies were complicated. In 2005 (at age 48) I had a pancreas transplant. It did not “cure” the diabetes but did help me achieve good blood sugar control for the first time ever. It had a good run for about 11 years then started to show some wear and tear decrease in function. In 2016 (at age 59) I was diagnosed with Type 2. I was at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN being evaluated for Kidney transplant. Diabetes (and high blood pressure) are leading causes of kidney disease. Now in 2022 (age 65) I’m diabetic and have chronic kidney disease (CKD). I use a continual glucose monitor (CGM) Dexcom G6. I do labs required by my endocrinologist and nephrologist. I follow dietary guidelines from a dietician who has a background in diabetes and renal requirements. I try to get exercise at least several times a week. This past autumn my brother was here visiting (age 69). He has a long history of Type 2. While he was here he got very sick. I recognized the familiar signs of diabetic ketoacidosis and took him to the ER. He spent a few days in ICU and was told it is possible that he is actually Type 1 not Type 2! He is home now and working with his local provider. So my point is that no matter what kind of diabetes you have there will be necessary changes: medication, labs, monitoring, diet, exercise ….. etc to come through it well. Last but not least is my personal Christian belief. This is a necessity for my spiritual health. Whether you share this belief or not you will need some kind of support system for good emotional & mental health.

Jump to this post

Thanks for your information. I have a Libre2 glucose monitor. I am glad to have it. I did not know they can do pancreas transplant. I will remember that to talk with my doc. Not sure I need it now but good to know it can be done. I pray that you are well and God's blessings in 2023

REPLY
@collegeprof

@kamama94 is so right when it comes to diabetes control and food habits. I have had type 2 diabetes for many years and found that this disease requires a team of docs like a PCP, endocrinologist, and dietitian. I started using the Libre2 nearly 2 weeks ago, and you may find that it fluctuates wildly, as for me many times it did not come close to the finger stick readings. After a week it was better. To have some control over this disease requires some daily exercise as well as food changes. That is why your endocrinologist and dietitian are so important. Lastly, get your labs done at least every 3 months by your PCP to develop a trend like the Libre does for you every 2 weeks.

Jump to this post

TY Yes the Libre readings do run around at times. I thought I had the blood sugar down once and changed the sensor when it ran out and the readings were different. I have questioned them and went into the doc's office and they measured it with the finger poke and at times it is higher and other times lower.
I figured out that I have to put the sensor in a place where there are no lipomas on the arm. If I find a good place, the sensor does not fall off and the readings seem to be better. I just got back from the doc's office where they did a lab test for A1C. Not sure what that is or how it is different that the glucose level that the Libre2 is reading. I will ask about it when I go in for the results. I had been eating mac and cheese and the devoted diabetes care person told me to avoid that. That dropped the blood sugar quite a bit. Now to see what this test shows.
Thanks for your info.
Roger

REPLY

@rpdelectronics you are so right when you say “it is easy to raise the blood sugar by eating things (or drinking things), but dropping it is not so easy.” In the 47 some years I’ve dealt with diabetes I’ve learned that when it comes to eating/drinking it is the carbohydrate content that matters. Even after calculating the specific amount (grams) not all types of carbohydrates are equal. For example the same number of grams of carb from fruit/veggies has a different result than the same number of grams of pasta /rice. There is a thing called the glycemic effect. What I’ve read on that is complicated. But what I think it means is that the effect of carbs can be different. Plus everyone is different. For me pasta or rice will cause a spike in blood sugar. That doesn’t mean I don’t eat it. It means I have to be very careful calculating the carb count and watch portion size like a hawk (no sloppy indulgences). I have to follow a plan that is a ratio of insulin units : grams of carbohydrates consumed. As others have noted a good medical team (PCP, endocrinologist, dietitian) can help you develop a plan that will work WITH you.

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@rpdelectronics

Thanks for writing. I had hypoglycemia for years from age 6 and until recently. Does that make me type 1 then? I knew how to deal with that but now the doc says I have hi blood sugar and getting adjusted to it has been rough. It is easy to raise the blood sugar by eating things, but dropping it not so easy.
I have a pretty good family doc and Devoted has a monitoring program. I get confused with some of this in that my gf likes to watch your tube with a dr. McDougal. He thinks that potatoes are great for diabetics. I am not so sure. I used to eat macarone and cheese and quit that and saw that helped. I avoid cheeses. I appreciate your comments.
Thanks for the comments. Roger

Jump to this post

To rpdelectronics:
When having Type 1 diabetes, the body can't make ANY insulin. With Type 2, the body can't make ENOUGH insulin. USUALLY (but not always) Type 1 begins in childhood, while Type 2 begins in adulthood. Both are serious, but obviously Type 1 is more so. Your doctor should be able to diagnose which you have.
I'm grateful that it's easy to research health concerns online here on the Mayo Clinic and on many other trustworthy sites. (Of course not all sites are so reliable.)
Sounds as though you are learning to make helpful diet choices. Another hint: I eat one fruit rather than drinking fruit juice because it takes a number of apples , oranges or whatever fruit to make one regular glass of juice that would contain many times the amount of sugar.

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I was diagnosed in 2004 as a type 2 diabetic. I think (?) it was a simple A1C test. 7.0 + is type 2 Diabetes. The A1C is not a fasting blood test. It is a 90-day average of your blood sugar. It’s a flat test meaning the time isn’t weighted to the last day vs the first and vice versa. In 2016 at age 60, I was somewhat active, but at 6’3” I weighed 250#. I was taking Metformin and up to 24 units of insulin every morning. I gave up gluten and dairy and in four months I lost 60# and didn’t need insulin but anymore.

I would try a gluten free diet and give up dairy. There are lots of substitute foods, but most people can’t give up cheese. I did it, six years and no cheese and I don’t miss it. Turns out I also have Celiac Disease, so no gluten for me either.

If you have any questions, please ask.

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