De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis

Posted by robinfreitas1967 @robinfreitas1967, Mar 13 5:21pm

How common is De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis in women over 50? I’m 53 years old health. My job is a tile finisher. I grout tile. well I spread grout with a grout float then I clean it off to do so I ring a big sponge all day long and wipe it off .I’ve been doing this full time for 12 years I went to the doctor because I was in horrible pain both wrists and it just didn’t go away. I was diagnosed with De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis. I applied for work man’s comp. and I was denied because of my age and gender. I think that what I do for a living caused this so I just wanted some advice and everything I’ve been reading it says women 30 to 50. I would greatly appreciate your help
Thank you Robin

@robinfreitas1967 De Quervain's Tenosynovitis is associated with the tendon that runs over the outside (wrist) side of your thumb. Obviously your job duties have contributed to this disorder. Did you physician give you any ideas on treatment(s) or refer you to physical therapy? There may be things you can do to keep on working using assistive devices, or possibly be retrained for another type of work that does not stress that tendon so much. If you want to pursue disability, does your physician support you in this? If so, you may need to contact an attorney to help you win your case. I am not a medial person, but when my hands hurt anywhere I wear hand/wrist braces to bed. That holds my hands still while I am sleeping so I can wake up with less pain. I hope you find the answers you need. Please keep us informed.

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My Dr. wanted to get an MRI done. I saw two doctors and they both told me from repetitive motions . Workmans comp. denied my claim because it’s also associated with my age and gender. Had carpel tunnel surgery done a few years ago from grouting finishing tile I am a healthy 53-year-old not overweight I’m 5‘4“r 130 pounds and I really think it’s just the 12 years of ringing sponges and pushing grout so I just wanted an answer so I can do to get a lawyer I love my job I want to go back to work

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Hi all, I have Tenosynotivis in my left wrist among other things wrong. I got some shots on Tuesday from my pain management Doctor. Helped a little. I have been diagnosed in the past with bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome, worse on the left side. I also have cervical stenosis and degenerative arthritis there. What really helps and are they all related? Thanks in advance.

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@jeanmnyc

Hi all, I have Tenosynotivis in my left wrist among other things wrong. I got some shots on Tuesday from my pain management Doctor. Helped a little. I have been diagnosed in the past with bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome, worse on the left side. I also have cervical stenosis and degenerative arthritis there. What really helps and are they all related? Thanks in advance.

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Hi @jeanmnyc, You'll notice that I moved your message to this existing discussion about De Quervain's tenosynovitis. I did this so you can connect with @robinfreitas1967 and @2011panc and see what helped them.

You ask some great questions about the possible relationship to carpal tunnel, and possibly even cervical stenosis and degenerative arthritis. I'd like to bring @dawn_giacabazi and @sueinmn as they may have some thoughts about that.

According to Mayo Clinic's info https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/de-quervains-tenosynovitis/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20371337, treatment for de Quervain's tenosynovitis is aimed at reducing inflammation, preserving movement in the thumb and preventing recurrence. Are you keeping your thumb immobilized and applying ice?

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Hi @jeanmnyc
Based on my experience with CTS & DeQuervain's Tenosynovitis and my orthopedic surgeon the exact cause of De Quervain’s tenosynovitis is unknown, but is usually seen in individuals with repetitive hand or wrist movements, injury to the wrist or tendon, and inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory arthritis. De Quervain’s tenosynovitis is most common in pregnant and middle age women.

DeQuervain's and carpal tunnel syndrome both pertain to inflammation of the tendons involving the thumb, but carpal tunnel syndrome involves more. It involves nerve damage. CTS involves the median nerve which is the most vulnerable component.

Diabetic Neuropathy can also share many characteristics. Approximately 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes will eventually develop form of neuropathy, or nerve damage, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. This nerve damage can happen anywhere, but tends to affect the extremities (hands and feet) first.

I’m curious what does your physician suggest??

Curious,
Dawn

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@jeanmnyc Thankfully, DeQuervain's Tenosynovitis is not one of the issues I have had, however a friend has it now, and another was so severely afflicted that he had to retire early from his dental practice (since stopping the motions causing the symptoms were not possible given his occupation.) Both were given the usual rest, refrain and ice advice, as well as injections. In each case, the relief from the steroids has been temporary.
As to whether the arthritis and stenosis are related, it is often seen with arthritis, but I don't know about stenosis. If you see a rheumatologist, this would be a question for him or her.
Once the inflammation is reduced, it may be advisable to see a hand therapist (this is an Occupational Therapist with special training in managing hand and wrist issues, not a PT.) If your doc recommends, a custom splint can be made to limit movement, and specific exercises can be designed to strengthen surrounding muscles & ligaments.
In the meantime, ice, ice, ice – 4-6 times a day is not too much!
Sue

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@dawn_giacabazi

Hi @jeanmnyc
Based on my experience with CTS & DeQuervain's Tenosynovitis and my orthopedic surgeon the exact cause of De Quervain’s tenosynovitis is unknown, but is usually seen in individuals with repetitive hand or wrist movements, injury to the wrist or tendon, and inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory arthritis. De Quervain’s tenosynovitis is most common in pregnant and middle age women.

DeQuervain's and carpal tunnel syndrome both pertain to inflammation of the tendons involving the thumb, but carpal tunnel syndrome involves more. It involves nerve damage. CTS involves the median nerve which is the most vulnerable component.

Diabetic Neuropathy can also share many characteristics. Approximately 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes will eventually develop form of neuropathy, or nerve damage, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. This nerve damage can happen anywhere, but tends to affect the extremities (hands and feet) first.

I’m curious what does your physician suggest??

Curious,
Dawn

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Hi Dawn and all. So far, I got a Shot and a needle aspiration in my left wrist almost two weeks ago.. Helped some. I have a 2 week F/O with my pain Management MD this Monday, Video Visit due to Covid 19. I am in NYC. She is affiliated with Weill Cornell Medical Center. I truly believe it is connected to CTS. Now, the right thumb is acting up some. We will see. Maybe I will have to get another special splint. I had two for the Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, that helped. Had to keep changing meds. to control that horrible nerve pain up and down my arms and into my hands and fingers. It would wake me up and go on for more than an hour and it would be unbearable. I had to insist on an EMG and finally last July, got the CTS diagnosis. All stay safe and well!

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@jeanmnyc

Hi Dawn and all. So far, I got a Shot and a needle aspiration in my left wrist almost two weeks ago.. Helped some. I have a 2 week F/O with my pain Management MD this Monday, Video Visit due to Covid 19. I am in NYC. She is affiliated with Weill Cornell Medical Center. I truly believe it is connected to CTS. Now, the right thumb is acting up some. We will see. Maybe I will have to get another special splint. I had two for the Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, that helped. Had to keep changing meds. to control that horrible nerve pain up and down my arms and into my hands and fingers. It would wake me up and go on for more than an hour and it would be unbearable. I had to insist on an EMG and finally last July, got the CTS diagnosis. All stay safe and well!

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@jeanmnyc, did you have your follow-up appointment? How did it go?

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