Comparison of NSAIDs and non NSAIDs for pain

Posted by cindiwass @cindiwass, Nov 26, 2021

Could someone help me to understand the pros and cons of ibuprofen, naproxen and others in that category? I don't understand the complications. I also don't understand about anti-inflammatories and plain old painkiller. I have inflammation in my knee and hip, but am beginning to wonder if anti-inflammatories over the counter medication is good for me.

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Tylenol is acetaminophen and the least bothersome on stomach. GI drs say you should only be taking this if you have to, compared to other classifications.
Advil and naproxen are ibuprofen and are better for inflammation but very hard on stomach. They can lead to stomach ulcers with excessive use.

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@cindiwass – Here's some information from Mayo Clinic that goes through the different pain medications and I think it can answer most if not all of your questions including benefits and risks.

Chronic pain: Medication decisions: https://www.mayoclinic.org/chronic-pain-medication-decisions/art-20360371

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@johnbishop

@cindiwass – Here's some information from Mayo Clinic that goes through the different pain medications and I think it can answer most if not all of your questions including benefits and risks.

Chronic pain: Medication decisions: https://www.mayoclinic.org/chronic-pain-medication-decisions/art-20360371

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Hi, thanks for response. I'm trying to understand it–get it in my head. The docs I saw (although I told them I'm taking naproxen for pain) did not tell me about the possibility of raising my blood pressure. I have tremendously high pressure and am starting to take medication (Lisinopril) to lower it. I will most likely need to take a second med along with the Lisinopril because it's still very, very high. So I read that naproxen may have an side effect on those with high blood pressure and so — I am looking for something I can take long-term without so many risks. Acetominophen is for mild to moderate(?) pain and my pain (knee and hip) is prohibitive, meaning it hurts some days very much to the point that I cry out in pain and can't do much. I did see an orthopedic surgeon who told me he wouldn't operate because my pressure is so very, very high and encouraged me to get it down. So I've been taking the 40 mg Lisinopril, however it's still very high, so I believe I'll have to go on the amlodipine which my primary care physician prescribed but I want to see for a few days if I can lower it with herbs and the lisinopril together. I had been taking naproxen on a fairly regular basis but am stopping for a while. Anyway, sorry for long post, thanks for your answer. I read the info in the link, thanks for that.
I do have a question. I had been using topical analgesics and that, along with the naproxen sometimes. But now I'm beginning to wonder if those things might cause a greater inflammation or pain once I stop using it. Just wondering.

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@cindiwass

Hi, thanks for response. I'm trying to understand it–get it in my head. The docs I saw (although I told them I'm taking naproxen for pain) did not tell me about the possibility of raising my blood pressure. I have tremendously high pressure and am starting to take medication (Lisinopril) to lower it. I will most likely need to take a second med along with the Lisinopril because it's still very, very high. So I read that naproxen may have an side effect on those with high blood pressure and so — I am looking for something I can take long-term without so many risks. Acetominophen is for mild to moderate(?) pain and my pain (knee and hip) is prohibitive, meaning it hurts some days very much to the point that I cry out in pain and can't do much. I did see an orthopedic surgeon who told me he wouldn't operate because my pressure is so very, very high and encouraged me to get it down. So I've been taking the 40 mg Lisinopril, however it's still very high, so I believe I'll have to go on the amlodipine which my primary care physician prescribed but I want to see for a few days if I can lower it with herbs and the lisinopril together. I had been taking naproxen on a fairly regular basis but am stopping for a while. Anyway, sorry for long post, thanks for your answer. I read the info in the link, thanks for that.
I do have a question. I had been using topical analgesics and that, along with the naproxen sometimes. But now I'm beginning to wonder if those things might cause a greater inflammation or pain once I stop using it. Just wondering.

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Hi @cindiwass, I took Lisonopril and direutic combination for 5+ years for high blood pressure in my 50s then my medication was switched to spironolactone after I participated in Mayo Clinic research study and my diagnosis was changed to hypertension related to primary aldosteronism (https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/primary-aldosteronism/symptoms-causes/syc-20351803). Here's another article you might find helpful:

— 6 Reasons Why Your Blood Pressure Meds Aren’t Working: https://health.clevelandclinic.org/6-reasons-why-your-blood-pressure-meds-arent-working/
— 10 ways to control high blood pressure without medication: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/in-depth/high-blood-pressure/art-20046974

Have you talked with your doctor about trying to figure out why your medication is not controlling your BP? Also, have you tried any lifestyle changes to help lower your BP?

REPLY
@johnbishop

Hi @cindiwass, I took Lisonopril and direutic combination for 5+ years for high blood pressure in my 50s then my medication was switched to spironolactone after I participated in Mayo Clinic research study and my diagnosis was changed to hypertension related to primary aldosteronism (https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/primary-aldosteronism/symptoms-causes/syc-20351803). Here's another article you might find helpful:

— 6 Reasons Why Your Blood Pressure Meds Aren’t Working: https://health.clevelandclinic.org/6-reasons-why-your-blood-pressure-meds-arent-working/
— 10 ways to control high blood pressure without medication: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/in-depth/high-blood-pressure/art-20046974

Have you talked with your doctor about trying to figure out why your medication is not controlling your BP? Also, have you tried any lifestyle changes to help lower your BP?

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Thanks again. Interestingly I have a thyroid problem, it has so far not been diagnosed as cancerous but my primary care Dr told me to see a specialist because the number (whatever it was) was too low. So I am seeing the primary care Dr soon and will mention it.

REPLY
@johnbishop

Hi @cindiwass, I took Lisonopril and direutic combination for 5+ years for high blood pressure in my 50s then my medication was switched to spironolactone after I participated in Mayo Clinic research study and my diagnosis was changed to hypertension related to primary aldosteronism (https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/primary-aldosteronism/symptoms-causes/syc-20351803). Here's another article you might find helpful:

— 6 Reasons Why Your Blood Pressure Meds Aren’t Working: https://health.clevelandclinic.org/6-reasons-why-your-blood-pressure-meds-arent-working/
— 10 ways to control high blood pressure without medication: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/in-depth/high-blood-pressure/art-20046974

Have you talked with your doctor about trying to figure out why your medication is not controlling your BP? Also, have you tried any lifestyle changes to help lower your BP?

Jump to this post

I haven't tried any substantial lifestyle changes, although I have lost weight. I see the website says caffeine may or may not have an effect. I've been drinking coffee for years, however, I'm going to try switching to decaf to see if there's a difference. It is very difficult for me to eat without salt. However I will try it for a week (ugh) to see how it will affect me. I don't add salt usually, but as noted, there is plenty of salt in food anyway. I am finally taking my pressure at home, I'll see how that works in reference to habits or lifestyle changes. Believe it or not, the pharmacist called me today to see how the amlodipine is affecting me. I was honest with her and told her I haven't started taking it. She was pleasant and told me to call her if I notice any severe change when I do start taking it. I was pleased by her concern. And thank YOU for your concern. So now — is YOUR blood pressure under control? 🙂

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@cindiwass

I haven't tried any substantial lifestyle changes, although I have lost weight. I see the website says caffeine may or may not have an effect. I've been drinking coffee for years, however, I'm going to try switching to decaf to see if there's a difference. It is very difficult for me to eat without salt. However I will try it for a week (ugh) to see how it will affect me. I don't add salt usually, but as noted, there is plenty of salt in food anyway. I am finally taking my pressure at home, I'll see how that works in reference to habits or lifestyle changes. Believe it or not, the pharmacist called me today to see how the amlodipine is affecting me. I was honest with her and told her I haven't started taking it. She was pleasant and told me to call her if I notice any severe change when I do start taking it. I was pleased by her concern. And thank YOU for your concern. So now — is YOUR blood pressure under control? 🙂

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My blood pressure is pretty much under control although I would like it to be a little lower. I check mine every morning and it's usually between 120-130/75-80. Although a lot of times when I check it at the doctors office or when I give blood it's <120/78.

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@johnbishop

My blood pressure is pretty much under control although I would like it to be a little lower. I check mine every morning and it's usually between 120-130/75-80. Although a lot of times when I check it at the doctors office or when I give blood it's <120/78.

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That's great, John. Thanks for the help.

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@johnbishop

My blood pressure is pretty much under control although I would like it to be a little lower. I check mine every morning and it's usually between 120-130/75-80. Although a lot of times when I check it at the doctors office or when I give blood it's <120/78.

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P.S. My husband's pressure is usually low. Never has been high. One of my friends said he just gives high blood pressure. 🙂

REPLY
@johnbishop

Hi @cindiwass, I took Lisonopril and direutic combination for 5+ years for high blood pressure in my 50s then my medication was switched to spironolactone after I participated in Mayo Clinic research study and my diagnosis was changed to hypertension related to primary aldosteronism (https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/primary-aldosteronism/symptoms-causes/syc-20351803). Here's another article you might find helpful:

— 6 Reasons Why Your Blood Pressure Meds Aren’t Working: https://health.clevelandclinic.org/6-reasons-why-your-blood-pressure-meds-arent-working/
— 10 ways to control high blood pressure without medication: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/in-depth/high-blood-pressure/art-20046974

Have you talked with your doctor about trying to figure out why your medication is not controlling your BP? Also, have you tried any lifestyle changes to help lower your BP?

Jump to this post

Hi again. I have another thought I'd like to mention. I am not taking the naproxen now for a few days and want to see if my blood pressure readings are affected. I'm finally taking my pressure at various times during the day to see what's going on. Also, I am wondering again if the inflammation by my knee might be further inflammed after the naproxen wears off. I'm wondering. I'll keep in touch, thanks so much for your help.

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