Stage 2 breast cancer: What treatments decisions did you have to make?

Posted by penpen @penpen, May 9, 2019

Just thinking how did you all decide between a lumpectomy or a mastectomy? I just don’t know. I know I would not like to worry about this coming back but yet a mastectomy is sure a lot more to over come.

I was just diagnosed 3 months ago with invasive ductal carcinoma and had to make the same choice…I had a bilateral masectomy with reconstructive surgery at same time…have phase 2 coming up in June. My decision was determined because of a very strong family history.. and I have never looked back..had hyperplasia cells in other breast as it turned out.My family and friends whom had cancer prior were a huge factor in my decision…it is different having implants but really…It was not a terrible surgery at all! But having said this, like so many have said…everyone is different and you have to do what feels.best for you…we are so blessed for the medical care we have available now compared to 10 years ago!

REPLY

I so appreciate all of the information each of you have posted. I have been diagnosed with Invasive Lobular Carcinoma. I too have an extremely strong family history with all of my 5 siblings having cancer. My sister had it in both breasts, my mother, my two grandmothers. My brothers coped with pancreatic, kidney and prostate cancer. I am strongly leaning toward bilateral masectomy as well. Again, thank you to all of you for input!

REPLY
@100154

I am concerned that my breast cancer could come back. I am trying to do everything I can that will help ensure that will not happen. One thing that I think my be extremely helpful is diet. If any of you get the chance and are at a Mayo Clinic Rochester (Cancer Education Center – Gonda Building) go to the seminar given by John Shin, MD, Hematology/Onocology, Mayo Clinic Rochester. The name of the class is “Diet and Cancer: Does it Matter What I Eat?”. The class is exceptional and has incredible research on how diet can make a huge difference. Independently, I purchase the book “How Not To Die” by Michael Gregor, MD, FACLM. This talks specifically about breast cancer and diet along with other diseases. It outlines foods, spices, etc that helps stop Cancer. This gives us another tool to help combat reoccurrence. Hope this helps along with the other decisions you need to make.

Jump to this post

Hello,
Thank you for this post. Diet is of great interest to me as it relates to our health. I called the Cancer education center at Gonda and they had not heard of this class. I wonder if you could provide further details, so I could track this offering down. Thank you!

REPLY
@cmd03

Hello,
Thank you for this post. Diet is of great interest to me as it relates to our health. I called the Cancer education center at Gonda and they had not heard of this class. I wonder if you could provide further details, so I could track this offering down. Thank you!

Jump to this post

The class was held on April 2, 2019 from noon to 1:00pm. It was on a pink sheet from the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. The headline was BEYOND the Diagnosis: Empowered to Live Well. April 2, 2019. Diet and Cancer: Does It Matter What I Eat? Learn Evidence-based recommendations for focusing on plant-based nutrition. John Shon, MD, Hermatology/Oncology, Mayo Clinic Rochester. Noon to 1:00pm. Cancer Educatin Center, Gonda Building, Lobby Level. This was the brochure, maybe if you call again with all this info they could find it. Also Dr, Shin gave us his e-mail (Shin.John@mayo.edu) maybe you could e-mail him and ask if he is going to give his presentation again. Hope this helps.

REPLY
@100154

The class was held on April 2, 2019 from noon to 1:00pm. It was on a pink sheet from the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center. The headline was BEYOND the Diagnosis: Empowered to Live Well. April 2, 2019. Diet and Cancer: Does It Matter What I Eat? Learn Evidence-based recommendations for focusing on plant-based nutrition. John Shon, MD, Hermatology/Oncology, Mayo Clinic Rochester. Noon to 1:00pm. Cancer Educatin Center, Gonda Building, Lobby Level. This was the brochure, maybe if you call again with all this info they could find it. Also Dr, Shin gave us his e-mail (Shin.John@mayo.edu) maybe you could e-mail him and ask if he is going to give his presentation again. Hope this helps.

Jump to this post

Thank you!

REPLY

What is proton beam therapy? What is bilateral mastectomy?

REPLY
@penpen

What is proton beam therapy? What is bilateral mastectomy?

Jump to this post

@penpen
Bilateral mastectomy is the removal of both breasts.

REPLY

I went on line to see what was the bilateral mastectomy….looks like a lot of work and pain. I did look up proton beam therapy and that sounds like it is a better way for treatment.

REPLY
@penpen

What is proton beam therapy? What is bilateral mastectomy?

Jump to this post

Proton beam therapy is the most technically advanced method to deliver radiation treatments to cancerous tumors available today. The unique advantages of proton therapy lead to potential fewer harmful side effects, more direct impact on the tumor and increased tumor control.

REPLY

It is a difficult decision. No option looks or sounds good because frankly, part of you is saying this can't be happening to me and I just want the cancer out of my body now! So mentally, it is hard to make a decision period. I wish that there was some guarantee, but either way you decide, there are no guarantees. They really don't know the full picture until you have surgery and they can more fully evaluate the tumor and your lymph nodes. My advice is to read the information the doctors give you, get your doctors opinion, ask your doctors lots of questions and listen to your heart and what is right for you. What option gives you the most peace? Remember that you are working with some of the best doctors in the world with lots of experience and knowledge. Whatever you decide, it will be ok and is right for your. Just take it one day and one decision at a time.
In July 2017, I had stage 2 estrogen positive invasive lobular carcinoma and chose a lumpectomy and 30 radiation treatments. I had never had a surgery before this, so I was extra nervous about any surgery. I took the advice of my doctors to have a lumpectomy. I had low risk factors for reoccurence. My lymph node results from surgery was 1 of 4 with a small amount of cancer. Anyway, I found that the radiation skin affects were not that bad. When I started radiation, it was suggested that I use Mepitel, which is a breathable film that they placed on the skin over the area receiving radiation and you leave on as long as you can before reapplying. Mepitel doesn't shield the skin or interfere with the radiation, but basically prevents your skin from sloughing off. You have to try not to get it wet so it will stay on longer, but I believe that it minimized my skin issues. I had a great Oncology nurse that applied it and helped me evaluate and told me what to do with the skin issues I did have. The worst part was that I didn't shower during this 6 weeks time. I just took baths so as not to get the area wet, but they recommend during radiation that you minimize anything that dries out your skin anyway. It was all very doable. Hope this helps. Praying for you and all faced with the decisions that cancer brings.

REPLY

I also had invasive lobular .. are you on any hormone blocker such as anastrozole?

REPLY

Yes, I am just taking that for 4 weeks then they did another bio, test and we are waiting for the results. If this drug is not working I will go on chemo. It's hard waiting for the results!!! I think I have decided to do a bilateral mastectomy sparing the nipple. I want to have all done in one surgery, no spanders stuff!!! What are you doing?

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.
  Request Appointment