ASMR for Anxiety Relief

Posted by januaryjane @januaryjane, Mar 27 11:52am

I just wanted to share something that helps with my anxiety. Its called ASMR (Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response). You can look videos up on youtube, forfree, and find something that soothes you. I know it sounds weird, but it is very helpful to me and many other people. I am prone to certain sounds and hand movements. Its worth a try. Everyone is different, so find something you enjoy.

@januaryjane I’m very glad that you have found something that helps with your anxiety. Especially at a time like this! How did you find this?

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ASMR is awesome!

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For those of you not familiar with ASMR, here's an article that helps to explain:
– ASMR, explained: why millions of people are watching YouTube videos of someone whispering https://www.vox.com/2015/7/15/8965393/asmr-video-youtube-autonomous-sensory-meridian-response

It's relatively new, so there is little science about it, but here's one article:
– Brain tingles: First study of its kind reveals physiological benefits of ASMR https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180621101334.htm

My daughter uses ASMR to help calm her and to fall asleep. Unfortunately for me, I find it annoying. Everyone is different. How does ASMR help you @januaryjane and @doorman? What are your favorite sounds?

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Hi, @januaryjane – thanks for sharing a strategy that has been effective for you in controlling anxiety. I'm certain other members would be interested in this and potentially have some questions or comments for you.

Mayo Clinic Connect director @colleenyoung actually mentioned her daughter has used ASMR and may be able to share more about how it's been helpful. Members like @jenniferhunter @nannyned @befferly @helenfrances and others also may be interested in this topic. Additionally, they may have personal experience with using the technique and if so, offer some feedback on their results with it.

What part of ASMR seemed weird to you at first, januaryjane? Which ASMR do you use? How have you found it's helped you?

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@becsbuddy

@januaryjane I’m very glad that you have found something that helps with your anxiety. Especially at a time like this! How did you find this?

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I actually found this years ago through a therapist I believe.

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@lisalucier

Hi, @januaryjane – thanks for sharing a strategy that has been effective for you in controlling anxiety. I'm certain other members would be interested in this and potentially have some questions or comments for you.

Mayo Clinic Connect director @colleenyoung actually mentioned her daughter has used ASMR and may be able to share more about how it's been helpful. Members like @jenniferhunter @nannyned @befferly @helenfrances and others also may be interested in this topic. Additionally, they may have personal experience with using the technique and if so, offer some feedback on their results with it.

What part of ASMR seemed weird to you at first, januaryjane? Which ASMR do you use? How have you found it's helped you?

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For me, my mind likes different sounds at different times. Some days i like the whispering, some days i cant do it. Im almost always soothed by hand movements, dunno why. It can feel like when you use a scalp massager on your head, when you get the sensational triggers. I think you gotta look around but the first two i started with are gentlewhispering with maria, and whispersred.

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@colleenyoung

For those of you not familiar with ASMR, here's an article that helps to explain:
– ASMR, explained: why millions of people are watching YouTube videos of someone whispering https://www.vox.com/2015/7/15/8965393/asmr-video-youtube-autonomous-sensory-meridian-response

It's relatively new, so there is little science about it, but here's one article:
– Brain tingles: First study of its kind reveals physiological benefits of ASMR https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180621101334.htm

My daughter uses ASMR to help calm her and to fall asleep. Unfortunately for me, I find it annoying. Everyone is different. How does ASMR help you @januaryjane and @doorman? What are your favorite sounds?

Jump to this post

Sometimes the role plays are good like haircut or spa type. Asmr has exploded over the years, you can pretty much find anything you think of.

Liked by Lisa Lucier

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@lisalucier

Hi, @januaryjane – thanks for sharing a strategy that has been effective for you in controlling anxiety. I'm certain other members would be interested in this and potentially have some questions or comments for you.

Mayo Clinic Connect director @colleenyoung actually mentioned her daughter has used ASMR and may be able to share more about how it's been helpful. Members like @jenniferhunter @nannyned @befferly @helenfrances and others also may be interested in this topic. Additionally, they may have personal experience with using the technique and if so, offer some feedback on their results with it.

What part of ASMR seemed weird to you at first, januaryjane? Which ASMR do you use? How have you found it's helped you?

Jump to this post

I think its just a weird conception at first. But it made sense to me after i thought about the soothing things i feel, from everyday life, the sound of a broom sweeping, others humming or whistling. I never knew why certain sounds did that, now it makes sense. I think its great way to find a bit of good feeling and relief. I also like some of the guided meditations or breathing videos. Its so important to Breath right.

Liked by lioness

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@januaryjane I agree with you lots of these thing you mentioned I love to feel a comfort in..

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I love to listen to the major 🎼works that we sang in college.
Our choral Director was a multi-talented musician with a wonderful sense of humor.

Liked by lioness, januaryjane

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YES! Of course, not all ASMR "artists" are good at what they do but there are some remarkable ASMR videos on YouTube. I have had spikes in blood pressure that dropped for super high to super healthy low normal within minutes of relaxing with an ASMR video. ASMR stands for autonomous sensory meridian response and it is not woo woo . it is a real physiological response that some people are sensitive to experiencing. There's quite a bit of research being published on ASMR recently, too. Here's a link to a new study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31275748

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