Arthritis: Knee

Posted by Julia @chynex, Oct 6, 2019

Hello, my mom has knee pains. She can no longer walk well again because of the pains. I’m just looking for any solution for her pains.

@chynex Hi Julia. I see you have posted before about a different issue but never having "met" you, please allow me to welcome you also.

Has your mother seen an orthopedic doctor? Is it possible that she has arthritis that has progressed to the point of needing a knee replacement? I have had two TKRs (Total Knee Replacement). Prior to having them, I was able to initially have cortisone injections which helped, and then when my arthritis progressed I got Synvisc injections which helped me tremendously. Eventually, that didn't help much anymore so I had the TKRs, one in 2013, and the second one in 2017.

If none of those are options for your mom then I guess the only other thing to help is an OTC drug like acetaminophen or ibuprofen. In acetaminophen, you can get a 650 mg dosage that is labeled for arthritis. I presume there is something like that for ibuprofen also, but since I cannot take that I have not noticed.
JK

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@contentandwell

@chynex Hi Julia. I see you have posted before about a different issue but never having "met" you, please allow me to welcome you also.

Has your mother seen an orthopedic doctor? Is it possible that she has arthritis that has progressed to the point of needing a knee replacement? I have had two TKRs (Total Knee Replacement). Prior to having them, I was able to initially have cortisone injections which helped, and then when my arthritis progressed I got Synvisc injections which helped me tremendously. Eventually, that didn't help much anymore so I had the TKRs, one in 2013, and the second one in 2017.

If none of those are options for your mom then I guess the only other thing to help is an OTC drug like acetaminophen or ibuprofen. In acetaminophen, you can get a 650 mg dosage that is labeled for arthritis. I presume there is something like that for ibuprofen also, but since I cannot take that I have not noticed.
JK

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Yes I have posted before for a different issue which I later found a solution to it. The group (Mayo Clinic Connect) is really helping out.
Thanks for welcoming me.

About my mom issue, she has seen many doctors but the drugs some of them gave to her doesn't stop the pains rather continue to be worst. She has tried many traditional herb medicine, but still
the pains persist.. I think I will tell about the drug, acetaminophen. Thanks

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@chynex I have osteoarthritis knee pain. I use Voltaren gel for my knee pain. It takes a couple days to start working and now I use it about 1-2 days a week. I also have worked up to walking 2.5-3 miles about 5 days per week. I am 67.

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@bonnieh218

@chynex I have osteoarthritis knee pain. I use Voltaren gel for my knee pain. It takes a couple days to start working and now I use it about 1-2 days a week. I also have worked up to walking 2.5-3 miles about 5 days per week. I am 67.

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I'm sorry for what you passed through.
Please where can I get the Voltaren gel?

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Voltaren gel is a prescription gel. My doctor said it is used for arthritis. I also use it on my elbow and shoulder. The tube is 100g in size. The gel spreads far, you use it sparingly so a tube lasts me 6 months or more depending on flare ups. Wishing you the best.

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Hi. I use Voltaren gel for all my joints andt it works well for me when I have flares.

Liked by Julia

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@bonnieh218

Voltaren gel is a prescription gel. My doctor said it is used for arthritis. I also use it on my elbow and shoulder. The tube is 100g in size. The gel spreads far, you use it sparingly so a tube lasts me 6 months or more depending on flare ups. Wishing you the best.

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Okay thanks. I just pray I can get it here in Nigeria..

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@candrgonzalez

Hi. I use Voltaren gel for all my joints andt it works well for me when I have flares.

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Please is there any side effects when using it?

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@chynex, @bonnieh218: Some general information regarding Voltaren Gel. Here in the US you need a prescription for it. Even with insurance it is fairly expensive, roughly in the $ 45.00 to $ 50.00 range last time I intended to get some. I was able to buy it in a pharmacy in Austria over-the counter, paid 17.00 Euros for the same size tube.
I used Voltaren Gel to try and relieve knee pain after I had it scoped. It might have eased the pain by 15% or so, but not helpful enough for me. The instructions on the gel itself – and confirmed by the physician – says to use a squirt about 4” long at each application, and spread it all around the knee, top, sides, bottom, above and below the knee cap. And to do this 2 times each day. I did this for about 3 1/2 months, then gave up. It became quite expensive!
I ended up having a knee replacement, after Cortisone shots, Synvisc-type injections, and scope surgery did not help. Knowing what I do today, I would try acupuncture, rehab-exercises, myofascial release type massages, and even PRP and stem cells before undergoing replacement surgery. This last step is final – once your own bone sections are gone, they are gone. I never considered using pain medications as a permanent solution to the Arthritis pain; in general the OTC drugs other than Aleve don’t do much for me, and the long term effects on your body probably aren’t the best.
That being said, knee replacement is effective for most people regarding ending or much reducing the pain caused by Arthritis. It also depends a lot on any given person’s lifestyle and expectations what you get out of the TKR. If all you want is less pain in everyday, average situations, it most likely will be great. If you (in that case, me) expect to pick up where I left off in regards to physical activity and sports, then no, it is not equivalent to your own knee.
Sorry to go on, but I did not have enough information about alternatives and realistic expectations about the surgery beforehand, and wish I would have done more research.
PS. I AM doing very well, 13 months after TKR. Good, some days great, some days OK, but I miss my old own knee at least once or twice a day for certain motions or capabilities, if that makes sense.

REPLY
@ellerbracke

@chynex, @bonnieh218: Some general information regarding Voltaren Gel. Here in the US you need a prescription for it. Even with insurance it is fairly expensive, roughly in the $ 45.00 to $ 50.00 range last time I intended to get some. I was able to buy it in a pharmacy in Austria over-the counter, paid 17.00 Euros for the same size tube.
I used Voltaren Gel to try and relieve knee pain after I had it scoped. It might have eased the pain by 15% or so, but not helpful enough for me. The instructions on the gel itself – and confirmed by the physician – says to use a squirt about 4” long at each application, and spread it all around the knee, top, sides, bottom, above and below the knee cap. And to do this 2 times each day. I did this for about 3 1/2 months, then gave up. It became quite expensive!
I ended up having a knee replacement, after Cortisone shots, Synvisc-type injections, and scope surgery did not help. Knowing what I do today, I would try acupuncture, rehab-exercises, myofascial release type massages, and even PRP and stem cells before undergoing replacement surgery. This last step is final – once your own bone sections are gone, they are gone. I never considered using pain medications as a permanent solution to the Arthritis pain; in general the OTC drugs other than Aleve don’t do much for me, and the long term effects on your body probably aren’t the best.
That being said, knee replacement is effective for most people regarding ending or much reducing the pain caused by Arthritis. It also depends a lot on any given person’s lifestyle and expectations what you get out of the TKR. If all you want is less pain in everyday, average situations, it most likely will be great. If you (in that case, me) expect to pick up where I left off in regards to physical activity and sports, then no, it is not equivalent to your own knee.
Sorry to go on, but I did not have enough information about alternatives and realistic expectations about the surgery beforehand, and wish I would have done more research.
PS. I AM doing very well, 13 months after TKR. Good, some days great, some days OK, but I miss my old own knee at least once or twice a day for certain motions or capabilities, if that makes sense.

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Thank you for a very comprehensive write-up. Your "been there – done that" is exactly the type info I am looking for. THANKS

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