After knee replacement surgery

Posted by beatricefay @beatricefay, Jun 16, 2016

Had left knee replaced 9 days ago. Right knee two years ago. Having a problem with inflammation so hard to bend knee and exercise. Trying to ice and raise knee above heart. Doctor suggested getting compression hose. Anybody have this experience and can offer suggestions. So tired all the time from pain interrupting my sleep and painkillers. My insurance refused to pay for the painkiller recommended by surgeon so have to take one with more opiates. That’s frustrating. Two years ago it was covered but now too expensive for me to use. Seems the drug companies, not our doctors are determining what we use.

@artscaping

@johnbishop, forgot to mention that the fascia issue happened about 4 years after TKR. I even went back to the surgeon. He personally walked me to X-ray and waited for the pics. When he said there was nothing amiss with the knee apparatus, he hugged me and said, “I’am sorry Chris, it’s the fascia.” I didn’t know what that meant or why I got the hug. I do now and that is why my daily mantra is to be free of suffering even if it is only for a few minutes or better yet, a few hours. Chris

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Chris @artscaping that’s good info. I’m still looking for a local therapist to see for my lower back issues.

Liked by Dee

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i had L4 and L5 issues and i had stem cells injected 3 years ago and i have no back pain now. It was amazing. Before that i was doing the steroids injections and each time i had the injection the cur lasted fewer days. Just goes to show you to let your body heal thyself

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@artscaping

@johnbishop, forgot to mention that the fascia issue happened about 4 years after TKR. I even went back to the surgeon. He personally walked me to X-ray and waited for the pics. When he said there was nothing amiss with the knee apparatus, he hugged me and said, “I’am sorry Chris, it’s the fascia.” I didn’t know what that meant or why I got the hug. I do now and that is why my daily mantra is to be free of suffering even if it is only for a few minutes or better yet, a few hours. Chris

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@danielad, @gldnrtrvrlvr, @tazscott @johnbishop, @jenniferhunter, You know, I just had an awakening. Many of our community have developed neuropathy somewhere in their bodies and sometime after what looks like multiple traumatic incidents, e.g. two helicopter crashes, falling down mountains and tumbling off horses. And then I read quite a few profiles and posts of multiple surgeries to repair, replace and renew. We are also living longer and those damaged and repaired areas are required to hang on and perform. But nowhere does it say they have to be quiet about it. Some days they scream and some days they whisper.

John, do you know of any research that points to trauma as in injury or surgery, as an impetus for diagnoses of "idiopathic". Are all of us in that "dumping ground of causes" responsible for our own condition? Did having 13 orthopedic surgeries ensure my acceptance into the "idiopathic" group? When I was told at 27 while hanging face down in a sling in the hospital for 3 days that I would have difficulty later in life, did I listen? Did I modify my risk-taking behavior? Of course not. Can we pass along words of precaution to the young folks we interact with….grandchildren, nieces, nephews, even great-grandchildren? Sure…but will they listen? "Methinks" they will not change their behavior. So….it is up to medical researchers to find solutions and our providers to disseminate the mindful messages appropriately along with helpful medications and lifestyle changes. My best pain-free day to all of us……we sure are listening now. Chris

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Hi Chris @artscaping, I have done a little research on idiopathic PN but not much else. It's just an opinion on my part but I do think that autoimmune diseases can be extremely difficult to pinpoint to a specific diagnosis in some cases. When I was first diagnosed with idiopathic small fiber PN the neurologist asked me about my family and thought it may be genetic or hereditary but without tests on different relatives there is no way to confirm the diagnosis. I've always looked on neuropathy boiling down to one thing that causes the pain – dead, damaged or compressed nerves. That's why supplements that offer cellular nutrition makes sense to me as well as myofascial release therapy and surgery to relieve compression if it's an option. I guess it's always better to know the specific diagnosis but for me it's not going to happen. I would love to see more research into non drug treatments and specifically hoping they break the code for stem cell therapy for neuropathy.

Did find one fairly interesting article…
Idiopathic non-traumatic spontaneous renal hemorrhage/laceration: a case report and review of the literature.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23472538

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@johnbishop, Thanks John….that was informing….and the warning about misdiagnosis was pertinent to dealing with idiopathic causes.

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@artscaping

@danielad, @gldnrtrvrlvr, @tazscott @johnbishop, @jenniferhunter, You know, I just had an awakening. Many of our community have developed neuropathy somewhere in their bodies and sometime after what looks like multiple traumatic incidents, e.g. two helicopter crashes, falling down mountains and tumbling off horses. And then I read quite a few profiles and posts of multiple surgeries to repair, replace and renew. We are also living longer and those damaged and repaired areas are required to hang on and perform. But nowhere does it say they have to be quiet about it. Some days they scream and some days they whisper.

John, do you know of any research that points to trauma as in injury or surgery, as an impetus for diagnoses of "idiopathic". Are all of us in that "dumping ground of causes" responsible for our own condition? Did having 13 orthopedic surgeries ensure my acceptance into the "idiopathic" group? When I was told at 27 while hanging face down in a sling in the hospital for 3 days that I would have difficulty later in life, did I listen? Did I modify my risk-taking behavior? Of course not. Can we pass along words of precaution to the young folks we interact with….grandchildren, nieces, nephews, even great-grandchildren? Sure…but will they listen? "Methinks" they will not change their behavior. So….it is up to medical researchers to find solutions and our providers to disseminate the mindful messages appropriately along with helpful medications and lifestyle changes. My best pain-free day to all of us……we sure are listening now. Chris

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I agree that alot of surguries leads to neurological problems. I was told I have complex regional pain syndrome years ago from to many surguries. I have had 37 surguries so far. With more coming. But what do you do. I mean all of my surguries were required. Mayo jokes and says I have nine lives. I also have Addison's disease. It's an autoimmune disease that can cause pain in the body. And the pain doctors don't understand that part either. They really have no clue about Addison's disease. Only Endocrinologist treat it. The disease has tried to kill me three times. I have been life flighted three times for it. So I think the Mayo one lifeflight nurses are getting to be my buddies. Lol. Sorry for rabbeling on. I have come to conclusion that I have to live with the pain. I use narcotics patches and that's as good as it gets. Hope everyone had a great weekend. Even though it rained the whole time here in Minnesota

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Give your knee some rest, apply ice to reduce swelling, wear a compressive bandage, and keep your knee elevated.

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Yesterday I had my 3 month post op visit for my TKR for my right knee. I have been really happy with the outcome (thanks Mayo Clinic!). I have no pain in my knee and my range of motion is 0 to ~130 degrees. The only issue I have and it's a big one, is the swelling in my right ankle due to lymphedema. I have been wearing my compression socks since about week 3 or 4 post op. Before surgery the compression socks would take care of the swelling overnight and I would start out each day good. Since the surgery, the socks really haven't helped a whole lot.

I got some additional instruction on the importance of icing and elevating from my surgeon and his assistant. I had really stopped icing and elevating when my knee started feeling better and I could ride my recumbent exercise bike for 30 minutes with no issues. They told me to take it easy for while and focus on the swelling. Best tip I received was putting a couple of pillows at the end of the bed and under the mattress so that you mattress is elevated at the bottom. Then use another pillow under your knee to support it and help with the bottom of the bed being higher. I did that last night and my ankle was considerably smaller this morning – YAY! Now I have to fine tune it a little. I also ordered something like a CryoCuff for the ankle only it has a small compression pump and you can insert a gel pack in it and wrap your ankle so that it gives you a compressed cold wrap to help with the swelling. I'm looking forward to trying that to make the icing and elevating a little easier during the daytime.

Hoping you all have success and if you are struggling, don't stop working on the problem – ask questions from your care team (or your Connect TKR friends!).

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@johnbishop

Yesterday I had my 3 month post op visit for my TKR for my right knee. I have been really happy with the outcome (thanks Mayo Clinic!). I have no pain in my knee and my range of motion is 0 to ~130 degrees. The only issue I have and it's a big one, is the swelling in my right ankle due to lymphedema. I have been wearing my compression socks since about week 3 or 4 post op. Before surgery the compression socks would take care of the swelling overnight and I would start out each day good. Since the surgery, the socks really haven't helped a whole lot.

I got some additional instruction on the importance of icing and elevating from my surgeon and his assistant. I had really stopped icing and elevating when my knee started feeling better and I could ride my recumbent exercise bike for 30 minutes with no issues. They told me to take it easy for while and focus on the swelling. Best tip I received was putting a couple of pillows at the end of the bed and under the mattress so that you mattress is elevated at the bottom. Then use another pillow under your knee to support it and help with the bottom of the bed being higher. I did that last night and my ankle was considerably smaller this morning – YAY! Now I have to fine tune it a little. I also ordered something like a CryoCuff for the ankle only it has a small compression pump and you can insert a gel pack in it and wrap your ankle so that it gives you a compressed cold wrap to help with the swelling. I'm looking forward to trying that to make the icing and elevating a little easier during the daytime.

Hoping you all have success and if you are struggling, don't stop working on the problem – ask questions from your care team (or your Connect TKR friends!).

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@johnbishop– John, this sounds good! Maybe also cut down on your salt if you use it. It might help

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@merpreb

@johnbishop– John, this sounds good! Maybe also cut down on your salt if you use it. It might help

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Hi Merry! @merpreb — Thanks but I never add salt to anything except popcorn and I don't have that often – he says after he just finished off some store bought stuff last night. I check everything I buy and try to be conscious of the amount of sodium to get the lowest possible amount. Every little bit helps though. ☺

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@johnbishop

Yesterday I had my 3 month post op visit for my TKR for my right knee. I have been really happy with the outcome (thanks Mayo Clinic!). I have no pain in my knee and my range of motion is 0 to ~130 degrees. The only issue I have and it's a big one, is the swelling in my right ankle due to lymphedema. I have been wearing my compression socks since about week 3 or 4 post op. Before surgery the compression socks would take care of the swelling overnight and I would start out each day good. Since the surgery, the socks really haven't helped a whole lot.

I got some additional instruction on the importance of icing and elevating from my surgeon and his assistant. I had really stopped icing and elevating when my knee started feeling better and I could ride my recumbent exercise bike for 30 minutes with no issues. They told me to take it easy for while and focus on the swelling. Best tip I received was putting a couple of pillows at the end of the bed and under the mattress so that you mattress is elevated at the bottom. Then use another pillow under your knee to support it and help with the bottom of the bed being higher. I did that last night and my ankle was considerably smaller this morning – YAY! Now I have to fine tune it a little. I also ordered something like a CryoCuff for the ankle only it has a small compression pump and you can insert a gel pack in it and wrap your ankle so that it gives you a compressed cold wrap to help with the swelling. I'm looking forward to trying that to make the icing and elevating a little easier during the daytime.

Hoping you all have success and if you are struggling, don't stop working on the problem – ask questions from your care team (or your Connect TKR friends!).

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@johnbishop – Congratulations on 3 months. That's a real milestone. I bet you are the best patient that doctor ever had. You follow advice and incorporate it into your life. Wishing you the best! From here on out it will be a breeze.

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@debbraw

@johnbishop – Congratulations on 3 months. That's a real milestone. I bet you are the best patient that doctor ever had. You follow advice and incorporate it into your life. Wishing you the best! From here on out it will be a breeze.

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Thanks Debra. The surgeon was happy the surgery went well and the knee was doing great but he was a little concerned about the ankle swelling and the possibility of an infection if I didn't start elevating, icing and moisturizing my legs. I told him I had stopped elevating and icing when my knee was feeling good and I could exercise on my recumbent bike more. I thought just because I was wearing the compression socks that should take care of the swelling like it did before the surgery. Guess my thinking was wrong so I'm heading to the fridge to break out the ice pack and elevate my foot for awhile ☺

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@johnbishop

Thanks Debra. The surgeon was happy the surgery went well and the knee was doing great but he was a little concerned about the ankle swelling and the possibility of an infection if I didn't start elevating, icing and moisturizing my legs. I told him I had stopped elevating and icing when my knee was feeling good and I could exercise on my recumbent bike more. I thought just because I was wearing the compression socks that should take care of the swelling like it did before the surgery. Guess my thinking was wrong so I'm heading to the fridge to break out the ice pack and elevate my foot for awhile ☺

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@johnbishop – ok… keep those legs up and the ice on!

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@johnbishop

Yesterday I had my 3 month post op visit for my TKR for my right knee. I have been really happy with the outcome (thanks Mayo Clinic!). I have no pain in my knee and my range of motion is 0 to ~130 degrees. The only issue I have and it's a big one, is the swelling in my right ankle due to lymphedema. I have been wearing my compression socks since about week 3 or 4 post op. Before surgery the compression socks would take care of the swelling overnight and I would start out each day good. Since the surgery, the socks really haven't helped a whole lot.

I got some additional instruction on the importance of icing and elevating from my surgeon and his assistant. I had really stopped icing and elevating when my knee started feeling better and I could ride my recumbent exercise bike for 30 minutes with no issues. They told me to take it easy for while and focus on the swelling. Best tip I received was putting a couple of pillows at the end of the bed and under the mattress so that you mattress is elevated at the bottom. Then use another pillow under your knee to support it and help with the bottom of the bed being higher. I did that last night and my ankle was considerably smaller this morning – YAY! Now I have to fine tune it a little. I also ordered something like a CryoCuff for the ankle only it has a small compression pump and you can insert a gel pack in it and wrap your ankle so that it gives you a compressed cold wrap to help with the swelling. I'm looking forward to trying that to make the icing and elevating a little easier during the daytime.

Hoping you all have success and if you are struggling, don't stop working on the problem – ask questions from your care team (or your Connect TKR friends!).

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@johnbishop I'm glad you're doing well, John. I don't know if this could help you for wrapping your ankle, but wraps for horses work pretty well and are inexpensive. I have some wrapping my foot right now because my horse stepped on me yesterday. It's not bad and I was able to pull my foot out before most of his weight was on it, and it bruised the top near my big toe. It was starting to swell a little, so I wrapped it with the stretchy horse wrap I had in my gear bag and still went for a ride, and it just aches a little bit. The rolls of wrap come in lots of colors and it sticks to itself without being sticky, and is easy to apply. You can get that were they sell horse supplies and probably find it locally.

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