After knee replacement surgery

Posted by beatricefay @beatricefay, Jun 16, 2016

Had left knee replaced 9 days ago. Right knee two years ago. Having a problem with inflammation so hard to bend knee and exercise. Trying to ice and raise knee above heart. Doctor suggested getting compression hose. Anybody have this experience and can offer suggestions. So tired all the time from pain interrupting my sleep and painkillers. My insurance refused to pay for the painkiller recommended by surgeon so have to take one with more opiates. That’s frustrating. Two years ago it was covered but now too expensive for me to use. Seems the drug companies, not our doctors are determining what we use.

@challie

This fall I’m undergoing TKR, my first. I’m currently talking with Mayo Rochester MN. (Was previously scheduled for 4/14/17 in Roch but 4/11 my appendix burst and I almost bit the dust.) Ten years ago my husband had both of his replaced (in Illinois–we’ve moved), six months apart.

Ten years ago: he used the passive motion machine for both knees, both in hospital and home; he had an electronic ice machine (like a cooler with a motor) that pumped ice water through the giant pads; he went to physical therapy for a few weeks, that after he had in-home therapy for a couple weeks. But my, how things have changed! Also ten years ago his doctor said if he didn’t have TERRIFIC pain control he wouldn’t do what he was supposed to and his knees would not heal properly.

For the most part the passive motion machines have been done away with as *many studies showed that a year or two after surgery there was no difference in those who used one and those who didn’t. Many docs believe using your own muscles more quickly begins the resuming of strength more quickly. There is more to recovery than degrees of bend; strength matters too. So, no machine for me since doc doesn’t believe in them. Guess after wrangling around with that giant machine after my husband’s surgery, I’m inclined to think doing without makes sense.

The only people I know lately who’ve used an electronic ice machine purchased one themselves. I’m assuming this has to do with insurance. ??? They were a God-send for my hubby so I’ll be getting one on my own dime whereas he was given (well, insurance paid) a new one with each surgery.

I’m now being told I will not have any official therapy unless my at-home, on-my-own post-op therapy is not productive. My Mayo doc said there are too many too-aggressive therapists, and there’s nothing you can’t do at home that’s done the same with a therapist watching. It’s discipline that matters–PLUS being very gentle with the leg that first while, which is apparently when we’re most vulnerable to a therapist over-doing things. I have heard stories on both sides of this coin, but more than not people did admit their therapists pushed so hard, the pain was so bad, that they sometimes had to skip the next day’s work. (Other side of coin: my husband loved his therapist who he partially credits with how well he did. He also had a terrific surgeon.) I’ve also heard there is a case to be made that we are more susceptible to infection at therapy facilities. I guess that makes sense.

Today pain meds and their abuse are under fire. However, if you’re in too much pain to properly do your exercises, where does that leave you? I do know there’s certain amounts of pain we just need to gut through. But good pain control so I can properly exercise will be something I’ll go to bat for.

All this to say … My how things have changed.

I wish everyone well and am firing up prayers and healing thoughts as I type. I notice nobody mentions Doc names. Perhaps there is a rule? It would be great to compare docs’ thinking.

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@10nsmom Hi. From what I can tell the surgeon who did both of my knees did the best job that I can see compared to what others are reporting. After the first 24 hours I had no pain, never needed to use a cane to walk and when I went for my first follow up check, I was in their waiting room when the nurse came to get me. She asked where was my cane and when I told her I never needed one, she said we are going to put you on a pedestal in the waiting room. That was 13 years ago. Now when I went back for another check as now I am doing A LOT OF WALKING (OVER 110 MILES THE IN LAST 10 MONTHS), neither knee shows any wear. That surgeon was at the Rothman Institute in Philadelphia, across the street from Jefferson Hospital. But with my experiences at Mayo you can’t go wrong there either. But I was also in the passive motion machine with both knees for my entire 3 day hospital stay post surgery, which I understand most doctors no longer use that machine. gailfaith

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” They seem to be affiliated with Regenexx ”
Regenexx has a reputation for charging @ $2,000 + more that other Drs. They may b good but more $$$$

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@mari

” They seem to be affiliated with Regenexx ”
Regenexx has a reputation for charging @ $2,000 + more that other Drs. They may b good but more $$$$

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One item i liked about Regenexx is they show the research success and failures with their patients. They also respond to me when i have questions. At the time i didnot know of other doctors. Now we have a chiropractor doing it, plus a company that is on the stock exchange that shows no research. Get what you pay for i guess.

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@challie

This fall I’m undergoing TKR, my first. I’m currently talking with Mayo Rochester MN. (Was previously scheduled for 4/14/17 in Roch but 4/11 my appendix burst and I almost bit the dust.) Ten years ago my husband had both of his replaced (in Illinois–we’ve moved), six months apart.

Ten years ago: he used the passive motion machine for both knees, both in hospital and home; he had an electronic ice machine (like a cooler with a motor) that pumped ice water through the giant pads; he went to physical therapy for a few weeks, that after he had in-home therapy for a couple weeks. But my, how things have changed! Also ten years ago his doctor said if he didn’t have TERRIFIC pain control he wouldn’t do what he was supposed to and his knees would not heal properly.

For the most part the passive motion machines have been done away with as *many studies showed that a year or two after surgery there was no difference in those who used one and those who didn’t. Many docs believe using your own muscles more quickly begins the resuming of strength more quickly. There is more to recovery than degrees of bend; strength matters too. So, no machine for me since doc doesn’t believe in them. Guess after wrangling around with that giant machine after my husband’s surgery, I’m inclined to think doing without makes sense.

The only people I know lately who’ve used an electronic ice machine purchased one themselves. I’m assuming this has to do with insurance. ??? They were a God-send for my hubby so I’ll be getting one on my own dime whereas he was given (well, insurance paid) a new one with each surgery.

I’m now being told I will not have any official therapy unless my at-home, on-my-own post-op therapy is not productive. My Mayo doc said there are too many too-aggressive therapists, and there’s nothing you can’t do at home that’s done the same with a therapist watching. It’s discipline that matters–PLUS being very gentle with the leg that first while, which is apparently when we’re most vulnerable to a therapist over-doing things. I have heard stories on both sides of this coin, but more than not people did admit their therapists pushed so hard, the pain was so bad, that they sometimes had to skip the next day’s work. (Other side of coin: my husband loved his therapist who he partially credits with how well he did. He also had a terrific surgeon.) I’ve also heard there is a case to be made that we are more susceptible to infection at therapy facilities. I guess that makes sense.

Today pain meds and their abuse are under fire. However, if you’re in too much pain to properly do your exercises, where does that leave you? I do know there’s certain amounts of pain we just need to gut through. But good pain control so I can properly exercise will be something I’ll go to bat for.

All this to say … My how things have changed.

I wish everyone well and am firing up prayers and healing thoughts as I type. I notice nobody mentions Doc names. Perhaps there is a rule? It would be great to compare docs’ thinking.

Jump to this post

@challie I wonder if his first knee was a Conformis, sounds like some might refer to the Conformis that way. I am glad he is doing well with both knees. The hospitals in Manchester (I live in a “bedroom community” of Manchester (NH), do not do the Conformis. Apparently it is more costly. Their net payback is probably not as much if they use that one. You should find out from the doctor what knees your husband has since he is happy with them. Of course even if he was not happy with them you would want to find out since then you could avoid getting that one. I think I will ask my prior surgeon which mine is. I am just curious, if I find out the name I will want to see how others rate it. It might not be the knee, it might be the surgeon. When I went back to him after a number of months to see what could be done he just wrote another referral for PT.

Thanks for the info on ice machines. Some of the are way out of what I would pay, which did you get? I am not looking for it to last a lifetime, just for awhile after the TKR.

JK

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@challie

This fall I’m undergoing TKR, my first. I’m currently talking with Mayo Rochester MN. (Was previously scheduled for 4/14/17 in Roch but 4/11 my appendix burst and I almost bit the dust.) Ten years ago my husband had both of his replaced (in Illinois–we’ve moved), six months apart.

Ten years ago: he used the passive motion machine for both knees, both in hospital and home; he had an electronic ice machine (like a cooler with a motor) that pumped ice water through the giant pads; he went to physical therapy for a few weeks, that after he had in-home therapy for a couple weeks. But my, how things have changed! Also ten years ago his doctor said if he didn’t have TERRIFIC pain control he wouldn’t do what he was supposed to and his knees would not heal properly.

For the most part the passive motion machines have been done away with as *many studies showed that a year or two after surgery there was no difference in those who used one and those who didn’t. Many docs believe using your own muscles more quickly begins the resuming of strength more quickly. There is more to recovery than degrees of bend; strength matters too. So, no machine for me since doc doesn’t believe in them. Guess after wrangling around with that giant machine after my husband’s surgery, I’m inclined to think doing without makes sense.

The only people I know lately who’ve used an electronic ice machine purchased one themselves. I’m assuming this has to do with insurance. ??? They were a God-send for my hubby so I’ll be getting one on my own dime whereas he was given (well, insurance paid) a new one with each surgery.

I’m now being told I will not have any official therapy unless my at-home, on-my-own post-op therapy is not productive. My Mayo doc said there are too many too-aggressive therapists, and there’s nothing you can’t do at home that’s done the same with a therapist watching. It’s discipline that matters–PLUS being very gentle with the leg that first while, which is apparently when we’re most vulnerable to a therapist over-doing things. I have heard stories on both sides of this coin, but more than not people did admit their therapists pushed so hard, the pain was so bad, that they sometimes had to skip the next day’s work. (Other side of coin: my husband loved his therapist who he partially credits with how well he did. He also had a terrific surgeon.) I’ve also heard there is a case to be made that we are more susceptible to infection at therapy facilities. I guess that makes sense.

Today pain meds and their abuse are under fire. However, if you’re in too much pain to properly do your exercises, where does that leave you? I do know there’s certain amounts of pain we just need to gut through. But good pain control so I can properly exercise will be something I’ll go to bat for.

All this to say … My how things have changed.

I wish everyone well and am firing up prayers and healing thoughts as I type. I notice nobody mentions Doc names. Perhaps there is a rule? It would be great to compare docs’ thinking.

Jump to this post

@10nsmom Where are you located, and how far from there will go to find a doctor you have confidence in? When I went to this ortho a couple of years ago (and he cancelled my TKR with me on the table, IV in, due to my platelet count), at the initial appointment I spoke to a number of people that came quite a distance to go to him. We all have different limits I think. I remember one woman who came up from Florida (this was in Boston) and another who came from somewhere in the midwest.
JK

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I’m right there with you Beatrice. I’m delighted that I had my knee done. I had a RTKR about 4 years ago, and for some odd reason, it never stopped hurting. The doctor tried everything – shots, P.T., nothing worked. So, the only thing left to do was a revision ….. he totally redid the replacement. It’s worked out beautifully …. like you, getting up from the floor I look like a hippopotamus, and it does NOT like it when the barometric pressure drops ….. OUCH!
One problem I’ve had is balance. I moved from MD to VA about 2 years ago and noticed a problem with my balance, taking more than a few falls. I went into P.T. and was then to go to the hospital’s wellness center to continue working out. Well, because I was getting ready to move, I didn’t go deciding I’d use the hospital’s WP where I moved (about 30 miles away). Well, I’m only now moving and sure enough, balance is shot. I’m going to have to do something but I’m not sure what yet.
abby

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@challie

This fall I’m undergoing TKR, my first. I’m currently talking with Mayo Rochester MN. (Was previously scheduled for 4/14/17 in Roch but 4/11 my appendix burst and I almost bit the dust.) Ten years ago my husband had both of his replaced (in Illinois–we’ve moved), six months apart.

Ten years ago: he used the passive motion machine for both knees, both in hospital and home; he had an electronic ice machine (like a cooler with a motor) that pumped ice water through the giant pads; he went to physical therapy for a few weeks, that after he had in-home therapy for a couple weeks. But my, how things have changed! Also ten years ago his doctor said if he didn’t have TERRIFIC pain control he wouldn’t do what he was supposed to and his knees would not heal properly.

For the most part the passive motion machines have been done away with as *many studies showed that a year or two after surgery there was no difference in those who used one and those who didn’t. Many docs believe using your own muscles more quickly begins the resuming of strength more quickly. There is more to recovery than degrees of bend; strength matters too. So, no machine for me since doc doesn’t believe in them. Guess after wrangling around with that giant machine after my husband’s surgery, I’m inclined to think doing without makes sense.

The only people I know lately who’ve used an electronic ice machine purchased one themselves. I’m assuming this has to do with insurance. ??? They were a God-send for my hubby so I’ll be getting one on my own dime whereas he was given (well, insurance paid) a new one with each surgery.

I’m now being told I will not have any official therapy unless my at-home, on-my-own post-op therapy is not productive. My Mayo doc said there are too many too-aggressive therapists, and there’s nothing you can’t do at home that’s done the same with a therapist watching. It’s discipline that matters–PLUS being very gentle with the leg that first while, which is apparently when we’re most vulnerable to a therapist over-doing things. I have heard stories on both sides of this coin, but more than not people did admit their therapists pushed so hard, the pain was so bad, that they sometimes had to skip the next day’s work. (Other side of coin: my husband loved his therapist who he partially credits with how well he did. He also had a terrific surgeon.) I’ve also heard there is a case to be made that we are more susceptible to infection at therapy facilities. I guess that makes sense.

Today pain meds and their abuse are under fire. However, if you’re in too much pain to properly do your exercises, where does that leave you? I do know there’s certain amounts of pain we just need to gut through. But good pain control so I can properly exercise will be something I’ll go to bat for.

All this to say … My how things have changed.

I wish everyone well and am firing up prayers and healing thoughts as I type. I notice nobody mentions Doc names. Perhaps there is a rule? It would be great to compare docs’ thinking.

Jump to this post

Hi there …. I’ve heard tremendous things about Rothman. A girlfriend of mine had both feet operated on (not at the same time) … it required pins, bone removal and I’m not sure what else. Each recovery time took a year before she didn’t have to use a scooter. But now …. she is doing great and she feels it’s all because of Rothman Institute. Sounds like a winner to me!
abby

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Seven months after my knee replacement surgery I had a small tear in the scar tissue that caused bleeding and swelling about 6 weeks ago. My surgeon said this was not common but he has seen it before with several of his patients. It has occurred again and he said to wait to see if the blood, swelling and pain subside before he will discuss arthroscopic surgery to fix the tear. Has anyone had this occur and what was the outcome?
Thank you. Ken

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It makes me nervous to know that can happen. But thanks for the heads-up. I am only 5 wks since my surgery. Was your incision stitched or glued? Good luck.

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@brendadepalma

It makes me nervous to know that can happen. But thanks for the heads-up. I am only 5 wks since my surgery. Was your incision stitched or glued? Good luck.

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Glued and stapled. This was my seconded knee replacement. The first on my left knee,2 years ago, has been great with no problems. The scar tissue tear was on my right knee which was replaced last July. This is not a common problem so you shouldn't worry. I'm hoping that someone else who may have the same problem can offer some options or diagnosis from their doctor.

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@niazumbanut

Beatricefay, I had a total knee replaced many years ago and it took me a year to fully recover. I was especially bothered with night demons ( pain) and Mayo said take Tylenol ( I wanted to “kill” Mayo) .My wife had total knee replacement went back to work in a week and 95% recovered in 6 months…she’s 5′ couch potato, I’m 6’2″ athletic but we KNOW women are stronger than men. BUT after a year I fully recover and after 10 years or more I take cardio dance and/or Zumba classes daily ( sometimes twice a day). My last visit to Mayo for review showed no wear on the prosthesis…I was very concerned with all my dancing. My doctor at Mayo told me to keep doing what I’m doing. So be compassionate with yourself, things will get better! Everyone’s recovery is different. Also review Mayo websites and Mayo on Youtube for knee replacement protocols.Best to you,I UNDERSTAND.

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When you are able to use supp hose, bff's dr. told her to put under pillow at nite. then in morn, do not get out of bed, put hose on then allow feet on floor. Guess it does not allow blood to go to feet? they r supposed to come in great colors now?

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I am 5 days post op and the swelling hinders my pt work. Wearing compression socks, icing, etc., all have not helped. Stopped taking pain meds due to constant nausea.

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Why dont you take your pain meds with food to see if theres no nausea ❤️

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@kmart

I am 5 days post op and the swelling hinders my pt work. Wearing compression socks, icing, etc., all have not helped. Stopped taking pain meds due to constant nausea.

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@kmart 5 days post-op is really soon to have returned to work. I agree with @flor though, try taking the pills with food. I had no problem with them after my TKR but I have in the past.
JK

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Hi, I’m new to this group so forgive me if this has already been discussed. I’ve had both of my knees replaced within the past 3 years. I recovered remarkably well. I have not however been able to kneel down on either of my knees without excruciating pain! Has anyone else experienced this? To me, it feels like kneeling on shards of broken glass.

Liked by EES1

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